Resources

Resources

How to Use this Page

Below are resources that University Writing has developed to support students and instructors across the disciplines in their writing and writing instruction. We define writing broadly, so you will find resources on ePortfolios, visual design, professional communication, and presentations in addition to traditional writing tasks like reflective writing, literature reviews, peer review, and editing and proofing.

Please use the keywords on the right-hand side of the page or the search bar above to navigate these resources. If you would like to use these resources in your course, please follow the Creative Commons information located at the bottom of each resource. If you plan to use the source in its original format, we ask that you leave the University Writing branding intact.

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Tagged Entries: ePortfolio

Faculty and Staff ePortfolios

ePortfolios can benefit faculty and staff as they develop their professional brand and communicate their values and work to different stakeholders. An ePortfolio can be one way to tell your professional story through sharing artifacts related to your research, teaching, and service. Use the resources below to help you begin developing an ePortfolio. Be sure to also review our ePortfolio pages that have general information for ePortfolio creators. 

Materials designed by Amy Cicchino 

This worksheet will help you begin developing your personal brand statement 

This worksheet helps you select and contextualize artifacts through reflective writing 

Finalizing Your ePortfolio

Before you publish, use these resources to review and revise your ePortfolio. 

Materials designed by Amy Cicchino, Heather Stuart, and Savannah Harrison

Once you have completed a draft of your ePortfolio, this worksheet can help you get feedback from professors, mentors, supervisors, family members, or peers

This worksheet can guide students in a peer review activity as they offer each other feedback on their ePortfolios

This checklist will help you self-assess whether additional changes need to be made to your ePortfolio before it is published 

Writing as a High Impact Practice

High impact practices (HIPs) have been shown to increase student persistence and engage students in deeper learning. Writing is a key aspect to high-impact teaching and learning.  Use the resources below to learn more about the role of writing in HIPs. 

Materials designed by Amy Cicchino

This handout will introduce you to high-impact practices.  

We have a significant number of resources related to ePortfolios on our site. ePortfolios have been called the eleventh high impact practice 

ePortfolios: Artifacts & Reflection

Artifacts show evidence of your experiences, knowledge, and skills and can be anything: videos, photos, internship experiences, study abroad experiences, research posters, and course projects. You’ll want to contextualize your artifacts with reflective writing, which can connect your specific artifacts to your larger professional goals and personal brand.  

Materials designed by Amber Simpson, Heather Stuart, and Parker Wade.

This handout offers examples of artifacts that you might potentially include in your ePortfolio. Remember, artifacts can be any kind of media  

This worksheet will help you brainstorm artifacts and connect your artifacts to the skills that you are trying to showcase 

Reflective writing allows you to articulate why an experience is important, what you learned during the process, and how you plan to apply your skills to future projects or endeavors. This handout gives you questions that you can use to begin drafting reflective writing for artifacts in your ePortfolio 

This worksheet will guide you in drafting reflective writing for an artifacts in your ePortfolio 

You can see how students at Auburn share and contextualize their artifacts by visiting our ePortfolio gallery 

ePortfolios: Audience and Personal Brand

Before you begin making your ePortfolio, consider who your audience is, what your professional goals for the ePortfolio are, and how you can create a personal brand that helps achieve those goals with that audience. Creating a personal brand will help you develop a coherent story with a consistent message. Once you know the personal brand you would like to communicate, draft your About Me section and work themes from your personal brand into the reflective writing that accompanies your artifacts. 

Materials designed by Trea Archie, Heather Stuart, and Megan Haskins.

This worksheet will help you begin thinking about your audience and goals for your ePortfolio 

This handout explains what personal brand is and why it matters

Once you’ve reviewed the Personal Brand Handout above, use this worksheet to help you begin drafting your personal brand statement 

The About Me section of your ePortfolio is where you communicate your personal brand and identity to your audience. This worksheet will help you draft that About Me section

Be sure to check out our other resources on personal brand.

ePortfolios: Design

Not everyone is an expert in visual design, but these resources will help you learn some core principles for an effective and accessible ePortfolio design. 

Materials designed by Heather Stuart and Parker Wade 

This handout introduces ePortfolio creators to four basic design principles: contrast, repetition, alignment, and proximity

This handout introduces ePortfolio creators to introductory concepts of accessibility like navigation, use of heading styles, color choice, alternative text, link embedding, and captions. If you would like to learn more advanced strategies for accessible design, please see our entry on Accessibility and Writing  

ePortfolios: Ethical Practices

When creating and designing your ePortfolio, you will want to respect the safety, privacy, and creative works of others. In addition to these resources, we encourage you to also visit AAEEBL’s Digital Ethics Principles for ePortfolios, which University Writing was active in creating.  

Materials designed by Toni Carter, Amy Cicchino, and Heather Stuart 

This handout walked ePortfolio creators through considerations for legal and ethical ePortfolio practices. 

This handout introduces you to concepts like copyright and fair use. Because ePortfolios can include existing media, ePortfolio creators are at risk for copyright violation. The handout includes key terms, frequently asked questions, and some scenarios to help you apply your growing knowledge of copyright and fair use. 

ePortfolios: Platforms and Technology

You need a space to host and build your ePortfolio site. These resources will help you consider what questions you should ask as you are assessing different platforms regarding content, privacy, and accessibility. Then, you can learn about the benefits and drawbacks of three popular ePortfolio building platforms: Wix, Weebly, and WordPress.  

Materials designed by Lucas Adelino, Heather Stuart, and Parker Wade. 

This brief handout gives tips on helping ePortfolio creators share, protect, or enhance the privacy of their ePortfolio 

This handout compares three popular ePortfolio platforms—Weebly, Wix, and WordPress—to discuss differences in ease of use, customization, storage, support, and settings 

If you’ve chosen Weebly as your ePortfolio platform, this handout can help you get started! 

If you’ve chosen Wix as your ePortfolio platform, this handout can help you get started! 

If you’ve chosen WordPress as your ePortfolio platform, this handout can help you get started!  

As you begin using your ePortfolio platform, try working through this list of tasks to learn about your website builder 

This handout introduces ePortfolio creators to introductory concepts of accessibility like navigation, use of heading styles, color choice, alternative text, link embedding, and captions. If you would like to learn more advanced strategies for accessible design, please see our entry on Accessibility and Writing

ePortfolios: Using ePortfolios in your Course

Faculty interested in learning more about ePortfolios and learning should reach out to universitywriting@auburn.edu in addition to exploring the resources below. These resources can either be moved directly into your course as instructional material or will discuss teaching and feedback strategies for ePortfolios. In addition to these resources, we encourage you to visit AAEEBL’s Digital Ethics Principles for ePortfolios, which University Writing was active in creating. 

Materials designed by Christopher Basgier, Amy Cicchino, Megan Haskins, Margaret Marshall, and Heather Stuart

This handout will introduce your students to ePortfolios 

This handout answers Frequently Asked Questions about ePortfolios your students might have 

Use this quiz and analysis activity to help your students test and apply their growing knowledge of ePortfolios 

This handout has a list of low-stakes activities that can help you develop ePortfolio thinking in your courses  

This worksheet will help you as a teacher reflect on what students are and are not doing in their ePortfolio reflective writing and identify appropriate next steps in adapting your pedagogy  

This scavenger hunt activity will take students through exploring an example ePortfolio and analyzing the choices the ePortfolio creator has made 

This worksheet is designed to draw your students’ attention to the ways in which an ePortfolio is designed and arranged to tell a particular story to a specific audience 

This worksheet can guide students in a peer review activity as they offer each other feedback on their ePortfolios

This worksheet helps ePortfolio creators move from peer review feedback to revision plans

This formative ePortfolio rubric can be used to help students self-assess where they are in the ePortfolio process as they create and refine their ePortfolios. You can also use this rubric to give them in-process feedback 

This summative ePortfolio rubric can be used or adapted to evaluate student ePortfolios at the end of the ePortfolio creation process. We encourage you consider which competency level best fits your context for teaching and learning 

We encourage you to respect your students as creators and authors by not using their ePortfolios in your teaching, marketing, or assessment procedures without their explicit permission. This is the form we’ve developed to retrieve and track student permission. This is not the same as IRB approval through your institution, which you will need to conduct research on students ePortfolios. This form can be personalized to include information about your department or program and completed by students for a record of ePortfolio permission 

ePortfolios: What is an ePortfolio

An ePortfolio is a personal website that communicates one’s professional identity and experiences to a public audience, such as employers, graduate schools, or review committees. The resources below will help you learn about ePortfolios and introduce you to the process of developing an ePortfolio.   

Materials designed by Amy Cicchino and Heather Stuart

Learn about ePortfolios: 

View this short Introduction to ePortfolios Video  

View this longer Introduction to ePortfolios Video  

This handout will introduce you to ePortfolios 

This handout answers Frequently Asked Questions about ePortfolios  

Use this quiz and analysis activity to help your students test and apply their growing knowledge of ePortfolios 

Tour of Example Student ePortfolio with Anna    

You can see more examples of ePortfolios by visiting our ePortfolio gallery

Last updated: September 29, 2021