Eduardus (Evert) Duin
Associate Professor
Biochemistry

Address:
179 Chemistry Building
Auburn, AL 36849

Phone: (334) 844-6072
Fax: (334) 844-6959
Email: duinedu@auburn.edu

Lab/Research Page

Honors and Awards

American Chemical Society Auburn Local Section, for service in "Connecting Chemistry and the Community" 2008
COSAM Faculty Travel Fund Grant ($300): Gordon Research Conference on Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism, Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA, USA, August 10 -15 , 2014 2014
COSAM Faculty Travel Fund Grant ($500): Gordon Research Conference on Molecular Basis of Microbial One - Carbon Metabolism, Bates College, Lewiston, ME, July 20 -25, 2008 2008
COSAM Faculty Travel Fund Grant ($500): Gordon Research Conference on Vitamin B 12 and Corphins, University of New England, Biddeford, ME, USA, July 1 - 6, 2007 2007
COSAM Faculty Travel Fund Grant ($500): Gordon Research Conference on Molecular Basis of Microbial One - Carbon Metabolism, Magdalen College, Oxford, UK, August 6 -11, 2006 2006
Grant to present a poster at the 31st Steenbock Symposium on Fe-S Proteins: Biogenesis, Structure and Function, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI, USA, May 19-22, 2005 2005
Competitive Research Grant ($10,000) : “Biodefense ”, Role: Principle Investigator 2004
COSAM Faculty Travel Fund Grant ($500): Gordon Research Conference on Molecular Basis of Microbial One - Carbon Metabolism, Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA, USA, August 1 - 6, 2004 2004
Promoting Research in Sciences and Mathematics ($100,000): “Circular Dichroism at Auburn University”, Role co - investigator (Principle Investigator: Douglas C. Goodwin) 2004
Competitive Research Grant ($10,000) : “ Activation and inactivation of the methane - producing enzyme methyl - coenzyme M reductase”, Role: Principle Investigator 2003
COSAM Faculty Travel Fund Grant ($500): Gordon Research Conference on Vitamin B 12 and Corphins, Colby College, Waterville, ME, USA, July 6 - 11, 2003 2003
Grant to visit the Grantsmanship Training Program (FASEB, GWSW, DOD, NIH), Tucson, AZ, USA, July 31 - August 2, 2003 2003


Research and Teaching Interests

Biochemistry: mechanistic enzymology, metalloenzymes, EPR/ESR

Isoprene Synthesis and Biodefense

Isoprenoids are a group of essential biomolecules present in all organisms, some examples of which are cholesterol, steroid hormones, and ubiquinones. Recently it was discovered that two pathways exists that are used to synthesize isoprenoids, the mevalonate pathway and the DOXP/MEP pathway. In humans and animals isoprenoids are derived from the mevalonate pathway. The DOXP/MEP pathway is the sole pathway in Eubacteria and apicomplexan parasites. Important multi-drug resistant and other pathogens belong to this group, causing for example malaria, tuberculosis, plague, cholera and anthrax. The goal of the proposed research is to fully characterize the proteins involved in the DOXP/MEP pathway and develop inhibitors specific for these proteins as potential anti-infective agents. We recently discovered the final two proteins in the DOXP/MEP pathway, GcpE/IspG and LytB/IspH, both of which contain a highly oxygen-sensitive [4Fe-4S] cluster in their active sites. The goal is to obtain a complete understanding of the reaction mechanism which will enable the development of inhibitors as possible drug candidates.

Methyl Coenzyme M Reductase

The production of the greenhouse gas methane by methanogenic archaea and the anaerobic activation of methane have long been considered to be separate processes. Recently, however, it was discovered that both processes are catalyzed by the same enzyme: methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR). The active site of MCR contains the nickel tetrahydrocorphinoid, cofactor 430 (F430). The long-term goals of our research are to understand the actual mechanism of methane production and the regulation of MCR activity by the cell. A successful outcome will provide important insight into how to slow down livestock methane production and production in rice fields. Both processes contribute to global warming due to the fact that methane is a potent greenhouse gas. Since MCR is also involved in methane activation, understanding the reaction mechanism will provide important information for the design of novel nickel-based catalysts that can perform this function. A process that is very important for the petrochemical industry.



Selected Publications

  1. Duin, E.C. (2012) Methyl-coenzyme M reductase. In: Encyclopedia of Metalloproteins, Springer Editions,http://www.springerreference.com/docs/html/chapterdbid/309397.html
  2. Duin, E.C., Prakash, D., and Brungess, C.* (2011) Methyl-coenzyme M reductase from
  3. Methanothermobacter marburgensis. Meth. Enzymol., 494, 159-187 – cited: 2 Duin, E.C. (2008) Role of coenzyme F430 in methanogenesis. In: Tetrapyrroles: their birth, life and death, Chapter 23 (Eds. Warren, M.J., Smith, A.), Landes Bioscience, Georgetown, pp 352-374
  4. Grabarse, W., Shima, S., Mahlert, F., Duin, E.C., Thauer, R.K., and Ermler, U. (2001) Methyl- coenzyme M reductase. In: Handbook of Metalloproteins, Volume 2 (Eds. Wieghardt, K., Huber, R., Poulos, T.L., Messerschmidt, A.), John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, pp. 897-914
  5. Johnson, M.K., Duderstadt, R.E., and Duin, E.C. (1999) Biological and synthetic [Fe3S4] clusters. Adv. Inorg. Chem., 47, 1-82 – cited: 40
  6. Johnson, M.K., Duin, E.C., Crouse, B.R., Gollinelli, M.-P., and Meyer, J. (1997) Valence- delocalized [Fe2S2]+ clusters. ACS Symposium Series 692, Spectroscopic Methods in Bioinorganic Chemistry, Eds. Solomon, E.I. and Hodgson, K.O., pp. 286-301 


Last updated: 10/09/2015