University Writing

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How to Use this Page

Below are resources that University Writing has developed to support students and instructors across the disciplines in their writing and writing instruction. We define writing broadly, so you will find resources on ePortfolios, visual design, professional communication, and presentations in addition to traditional writing tasks like reflective writing, literature reviews, peer review, and editing and proofing.

Please use the keywords on the right-hand side of the page or the search bar above to navigate these resources. If you would like to use these resources in your course, please follow the Creative Commons information located at the bottom of each resource. If you plan to use the source in its original format, we ask that you leave the University Writing branding intact.

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Tagged Entries: Annotating Sources

Paraphrasing and Summarizing

Use these handouts and resources to understand the difference between quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing as well as when to use each technique. 

Materials designed by Christopher Basgier, Katharine Brown, Amy Cicchino, and Megan Haskins

This worksheet will help you practice paraphrasing 

This worksheet will help you write an annotation for a source for an annotated bibliography 

This worksheet introduces you to the Chicago Style standard of writing and helps you practice paraphrasing and summarizing in Chicago

This worksheet gets writers considering how to paraphrase and summarize a source 

This activity asks you to consider whether or not something is plagiarized 

This handout provides an easy reference list of common transitional words and phrases 

Reading

Carefully and critically reading is an important part of being a successful student and professional. Reading can help you understand important information and learn more about how a particular kind of writing is created.  

Materials designed by Christopher Basgier, Katharine Brown, Margaret J. Marshall, and James Truman

This handout guides you through “reading like a writer,” an analysis strategy developed to help you think about the choices the writer made 

This worksheet helps you apply reading like a writer to your work by inviting you to examine written artifacts from a writerly perspective by paying attention to features like structure, key terms, signposting, and verb use

This handout provides you with tools you can use to make sense of difficult reading material by engaging in active reading 

This worksheet will help you make important observations about a text before you begin reading it by previewing 

This handout gives a broad overview of academic scholarship and strategies that you can use to actively read the major parts of an academic research publication 

This worksheet introduces you to a says/does outline, which can help you understand why and how a writer communicates their ideas