Scholarships Checklist

News and Events

We routinely post exciting Auburn news, stories, and events as they pertain to scholarships, scholarship recipients, and enrollment.

  • Three Auburn University students named Goldwater Scholars
  • Auburn University announces nominees for prestigious Rhodes, Marshall and Mitchell scholarships
  • Auburn University posts record enrollment, highest freshman ACT scores
  • Auburn University graduate to study at Oxford University with Phi Kappa Phi Fellowship and Clarendon Fund Scholarship
  • A record four Auburn University students named Fulbright Scholars for 2015
  • Auburn University senior receives Udall Scholarship for Excellence in National Environmental Policy
  • Two Auburn University juniors named Goldwater Scholars

Three Auburn University students named Goldwater Scholars


April 6, 2016

By: Paul Harris

Auburn University Honors College juniors Sara Head, Jennifer Kaczmarek and Natasha Narayanan have been chosen as 2016 Barry M. Goldwater Scholars, an honor bestowed to only 252 students nationwide this year. The scholarship is widely considered the most prestigious award in the United States for undergraduates in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Both Head and Kaczmarek are chemical engineering majors in the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering. They are undergraduate researchers on a team led by Elizabeth Lipke, the Mary and John H. Sanders Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering.

Head's research aims to create engineered functional cardiac tissues which are structurally, biologically and genetically similar to native human heart tissues by using materials that mimic biological environments to provide structure to cells, forming three dimensional cardiac tissues. Ultimately, the goal is to determine which material or combination of materials provides the best environment for tissue growth that accurately mimics the native human heart. This method of engineering cardiac tissues could be used to better understand human heart development and the effects of drugs on cardiac tissues, as well as for regenerative medicine.

Kaczmarek's research involves the engineering of human cardiac tissue within a lab setting in a way that is as similar to the native heart as possible. Her work involved using these tissues that mimic the human heart in order to model the impact of drugs on human cardiac tissue. Furthermore, she also studies the development and progression of cells as they develop into functioning cardiac cells.

"Sara and Jennifer have the qualities that I know are important to success as researchers in chemical engineering," said Lipke. "They are self-motivated, they have a keen interest in learning and discovery of knowledge beyond what is already known, and they are highly efficient in taking things from idea to implementation. I have mentored numerous undergraduate researchers over the years, almost all of whom have gone on to graduate or medical school or are planning to do so. Sara and Jennifer are among the best and I have little doubt in their becoming highly productive future researchers."

Narayanan, a double major in biochemistry and Spanish in the College of Sciences and Mathematics and the College of Liberal Arts, respectively, has conducted two undergraduate research projects, both under the direction of Bradley Merner, assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. As part of the first project, she worked to incorporate a chemical modification into antisense therapeutics drugs, which may lead to better treatments for genetic diseases. Her second research project relates to medicinal chemistry, which she hopes to apply to the synthesis of a natural product known as haouamine A, a product that has shown selective anticancer activity in human colon carcinoma cells.

"Natasha is an exceptionally talented researcher," said Merner. "She has an uncanny ability to retain information and a desire to make experiments work that cannot be taught. A truly gifted student, Natasha embodies all of the qualities that make for a future leader in science."

"We are proud of these extraordinary women, all members of the Honors College, who have each combined academic excellence in the classroom with ingenuity in their research programs, said Melissa Baumann, director of the Auburn University Honors College and assistant provost for Undergraduate Studies. "We look forward to great things from Natasha, Jennifer and Sara and also recognize the pivotal role played by their faculty mentors in their success."

The Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship Program was established to provide scholarships to outstanding students who intend to pursue careers in mathematics, the natural sciences and engineering. Each scholarship covers eligible expenses up to a maximum of $7,500 annually for undergraduate tuition, fees, books and housing. In awarding scholarships, the foundation of trustees considers the nominee's field of study and career objectives along with the extent to which that individual has the commitment and potential to make a significant contribution to the field of science or engineering.

The National Prestigious Scholarship office at Auburn University, located in the Honors College, works closely with students to identify and help them pursue prestigious scholarship national and international awards through information sessions and one-on-one support during the application process.

Auburn University announces nominees for prestigious Rhodes, Marshall and Mitchell scholarships


October 13, 2015

By: Paul Harris

Auburn University students are among the nominees for three of the nation's top postgraduate honors, the Rhodes, Marshall and Mitchell scholarships. Students awarded these scholarships will pursue their individual fields of study at prestigious universities in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

"These students evoke the core values of Auburn University," said Melissa Baumann, assistant provost for undergraduate studies and director of the Honors College. "They have succeeded through hard work in their courses and extracurricular activities and they are men and women of character. These scholarships are some of the most prestigious international awards and we are pleased to nominate them."

Three seniors at Auburn are nominees for the Rhodes Scholarship, which gives 32 of the most outstanding young scholars in the country an opportunity to study at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. The scholarship, one of the oldest in the world, is awarded to students with proven intellectual and academic achievement, integrity of character, qualities of leadership and proven respect for their fellow humankind.

Sean Bittner of Clearwater, Florida, is a senior Honors College student with a major in chemical engineering in the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering and a minor in Spanish in the College of Liberal Arts. Bittner is actively involved in a host of disciplinary and non-disciplinary organizations, most notably as a summer intern with the Alabama Alliance of Students with Disabilities-STEM program. An Auburn University Undergraduate Research Fellow, Bittner is working on an interdisciplinary project under the direction of Edward Davis, professor in materials engineering, which focuses on loading halloysite nanotubes with antibiotics for wound treatment and infection prevention.

Chloe Chaudhury of Auburn, Alabama, is a senior in the Honors College majoring in biochemistry in the College of Sciences and Mathematics with a minor in dance in the College of Liberal Arts. Elected to Phi Beta Kappa during her junior year, Chaudhury is a member of the Auburn Indian Music Ensemble. In addition, she serves as an undergraduate learning assistant for freshman physics, as captain of AU Rhythm and a COSAM Summer Science Institute counselor. Under the direction of Satya Pondugula in the College of Veterinary Medicine, Chaudhury's research examines the development of novel and safer therapeutic approaches to reverse chemoresistance in human cancer patients.

Blake Willoughby of Phenix City, Alabama, is a senior with a double major in theatre and political science in the College of Liberal Arts. Willoughby serves as president of AU Players, as public relations liaison for the Department of Theatre and as assistant artistic director for Mosaic Theatre Company, a student ensemble which creates works of theatre devised around issues of diversity and social justice. In addition to Willoughby's organizational leadership, he has served as director, assistant director and actor in numerous plays and performances. His undergraduate faculty mentor is Tessa Carr, assistant professor in the Department of Theatre.

Six Auburn students have been nominated for the Marshall Scholarship, which provides up to 40 of the most outstanding undergraduates in the country an opportunity to study at any university in the United Kingdom. This award focuses on exceptional academic merit and the potential a student may have to be a world leader and ambassador.

Jessica Adams of Phenix City, Alabama, is an Honors College senior with a major in microbiology in the College of Sciences and Mathematics and a minor in hunger studies in the College of Human Sciences. Selected to Phi Kappa Phi her junior year, she also is a recipient of the society's Susan Stacy Entrenkin Yates Scholastic Award and is the recipient of Auburn University Undergraduate Woman of Distinction Award. Her many service activities include treasurer and representative at-large for the Committee of 19, Auburn's anti-hunger initiative; IMPACT project coordinator; and student ambassador to Presidents United to Solve Hunger, or PUSH. Adam's faculty advisor is Kate Thornton, director of Hunger and Sustainability Initiatives at the Hunger Studies Institute in the College of Human Sciences.

Azeem Ahmed of Auburn, Alabama, is an Honors College and 2014 Auburn graduate with a finance major from the Raymond J. Harbert College of Business and a sustainability minor from University College. A 2014 Clinton Global Hunger Leadership Fellow and a recipient of the President's Medal in the Harbert College of Business, Ahmed served as vice president of Campus Kitchens Project and president of the Committee of 19 while at Auburn. His major professor was Harriet Giles, director of external relations in the College of Human Sciences and managing director of Auburn's Hunger Solutions Institute.

Sydney Herndon of Chelsea, Alabama, is a summer 2013 Honors College graduate with a double major in anthropology and art history from the College of Liberal Arts and a double minor in Spanish from the College of Liberal Arts and sustainability from University College. A co-founder and President of Auburn University's ONE Chapter, an international organization to end extreme poverty, Herndon joined the United Nations World Food Programme, or WFP, during her senior year and since then has continued at the WFP as an Emergency Preparedness and Support Response Officer. Among her many professional responsibilities, Herndon has analyzed operational data from past emergency responses to include the 2013 South Sudan conflict, the 2014 Ebola virus disease epidemic and the 2015 Nepal earthquake, to name a few. Herndon's faculty advisor is Kate Thornton, director of Hunger and Sustainability Initiatives at the Hunger Studies Institute in the College of Human Sciences.

Also nominated for the Marshall Scholarship are Bittner, Chaudhury and Willoughby.

Auburn has endorsed two students, Chaudhury and Willoughby, for the George J. Mitchell Scholarship. The Mitchell Scholarship provides 12 students nationwide the opportunity to study in Ireland. The award criteria focus on scholarship, leadership and commitment to community and public service.

"Our students must be endorsed by the university's national prestigious scholarships committee to receive a nomination," said Paul Harris, director of national prestigious scholarships, who worked with the students, along with their faculty mentors, to help prepare them for the application process. "As part of their applications, they were required to submit a personal essay and letters of recommendation which highlighted their scholarly potential and their character and suitability for the award."

Auburn University posts record enrollment, highest freshman ACT scores


September 8, 2015

By: Charles Martin

Auburn University has achieved its highest enrollment and top freshman ACT scores in history this fall, according to numbers released today by Auburn's Office of Institutional Research.

An enrollment of 27,287 is 1,375 more students than in fall 2014. The new freshman class accounts for 4,902 students, 310 more than last fall.

"Auburn University's outstanding academic programs, faculty and student body continue to attract record numbers of prospective students to our campus," said Cindy Singley, director of University Recruitment. "Combined with the spirit of the Auburn Family and the Auburn community, they want to be a part of it, too."

The new freshman class boasts an average ACT score of 27.3 and an average high school GPA of 3.83. Fifty-nine percent of the new class is from Alabama, while 41 percent is from out-of-state.

At the undergraduate level, enrollment is 21,786, an increase of 1,157 students from last year. Enrollment in post-baccalaureate programs, which includes professional students in the Harrison School of Pharmacy and College of Veterinary Medicine, as well as graduate students in other programs, is 5,501, which is 218 more students than last year.

There are 1,250 new undergraduate transfer students, a decrease of 20 students from last fall, and 1,656 new graduate students in all fields, up 49 students.

Official enrollment numbers are calculated after the 15th class day of every fall semester and reported by Auburn's Office of Institutional Research.

Auburn University graduate to study at Oxford University with Phi Kappa Phi Fellowship and Clarendon Fund Scholarship


August 6, 2015

By: Wade Berry

Auburn University graduate Alyssa White has been awarded both a Phi Kappa Phi National Fellowship and a Clarendon Fund Scholarship which she will apply to graduate studies beginning this fall at Oxford University in England. The receipt of both will provide full funding of her graduate studies in archaeological science for the next four years – from a Master of Science degree, or MSc, through a doctorate.

White, a native of Auburn, Alabama, graduated in spring of 2014 from the Honors College and the College of Liberal Arts with a double major in anthropology and Spanish and a minor in East Asian studies. Her research advisor is Kristrina Shuler, associate professor of anthropology in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work. White lives in Oxford with her husband, Patrick Donnan, who is currently a Marshall Scholar.

"I am very grateful for all of the support that I received from my professors at Auburn" said White. "I am thankful to my letter writers, Dr. Schuler, Dr. Lorriane Wolf, Dr. Paul Harris and especially the late Dr. John Cottier. "I look forward to the challenging years ahead at Oxford where I will grow and expand as a person and a researcher."

In the summer of 2013, White participated in the Harvard Summer School program in Kyoto, Japan, where she took advanced courses in Japanese language, religion and history. Funding for Alyssa's study abroad experience came from the support of the Doug and Lisa Kilton Fellowship established in the Honors College in the spring of 2012.

While at Auburn, White served as associate editor of the Auburn University Journal of Undergraduate Studies and as an assistant director of the campus biological anthropology lab. She was a two-time recipient of the university's competitive Undergraduate Research Fellowship, was selected for the Phi Kappa Phi Most Outstanding Freshman Award and Phi Kappa Phi Most Outstanding Second Year Award and was one of only a few third-year students elected to Phi Beta Kappa in the spring of 2013. She was a Japanese tutor at the campus language lab, presented her peer-reviewed research to state, regional and national conferences and authored two peer-reviewed publications. As a junior in March of 2013, she received the Women's Studies Undergraduate Student Achievement Award.

White received one of the 51 Fellowships of $5,000 each that the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi awards each year to members entering their first year of graduate or professional study. Each active Phi Kappa Phi chapter may select one candidate from among its local applicants to compete for the Society-wide awards. This is the third consecutive year that an Auburn University graduate has been awarded a Phi Kappa Phi Fellowship.

In addition to receiving the Phi Kappa Phi National Fellowship, White has been named a Clarendon Scholar – one of only 140 scholars selected world-wide this year. Funded through a contribution from Oxford University Press, the Clarendon Scholarship supports outstanding graduate students from outside of the United Kingdom. For Clarendon Scholars, all tuition and fees are waived and living expenses are covered. For more information on the Clarendon Scholarship, click here.

A record four Auburn University students named Fulbright Scholars for 2015


June 18, 2015

By: Wade Berry

Four Auburn University Honors College students who graduated this spring have been awarded Fulbright Scholarships. Tyler Look, Matthew Goforth, Matthew Pollock and Steven Vickers will continue their studies in Berlin, Munich, the village of Trittau in Germany, and Latvia, respectively.

In the past six years, 14 Auburn University students have been named Fulbright recipients; this year's four students is a school record.

Houston native Look graduated from the colleges of Business and Liberal Arts with a double major in aviation management and German-international trade and a minor in Spanish. He was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to examine public transportation systems at the Technical University of Berlin. In 2014, Look participated in the Auburn University exchange semester in Germany where he earned the Goethe Institute German Language certification. While at Auburn, Look was a four-year member of the Marching Band.

"The focus of my research is to analyze the economic, political, social and environmental factors that specifically influence citizens to choose various modes of transportation within a densely populated city," Look said. "I am looking forward to spending the next academic year abroad and to the adventures that lie ahead."

Huntsville native Goforth graduated from the colleges of Sciences and Mathematics and Liberal Arts with a major in physics and a minor in German. He has conducted research on fusion energy plasmas under the direction of David Maurer in the Department of Physics for the past year and a half. He was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to continue his research on complex plasma experiments at the Technical University of Munich where he will join the Complex Plasma Research Group at the German Aerospace on the university's campus. Goforth is the son of a retired U.S. Army officer and was born in Ansbach, Germany.

"My work at the German Aerospace Center will include the planning of complex plasma experiments as well as providing a detailed analysis of space data using specially adjusted image analysis techniques," Goforth said. "I am eager to join leading German scientists and researchers in support of the International Space Station. My Fulbright year promises to be a life-changing experience and I am grateful for this opportunity."

Port Orange, Florida, native Pollock graduated from the College of Liberal Arts with a double major in English literature and Spanish and minors in linguistics and German. He was awarded a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship to teach high school students in the northern German village of Trittau. Pollack served as a tutor with the Miller Writing Center for the past two years and last summer attended the Goethe Institute in Berlin summer language program.

"My work as a tutor in the Miller Writing Center has prepared me well for the rigors of teaching English in Germany," Pollock said. "Of course, teaching is a two-way street and I look forward to improving my German language skills and cultural competence while abroad."

Mobile native Vickers graduated from the College of Liberal Arts with a major in history. He was awarded a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship to teach English to high school and middle school students in Riga, the capital of Latvia. Before coming to Auburn, Vickers served on the City of Mobile Police Department for six years. For the past two years he has served as a tutor with the Athletics Department.

"My experience as a police officer in Mobile forced me to see the world from many different perspectives," Vickers said. "In Latvia, I will be immersed in a culture completely different from my own which will challenge me in way I could only imagine. I am looking forward to the challenge."

"We are excited for Tyler, Matthew, Steven and Matthew," said Melissa Baumann, Auburn assistant provost and director of the Honors College. "The Fulbright award is an acknowledgment of their hard work and their potential for future accomplishments in their disciplines. They are all outstanding representatives of Auburn University and we send them off with sincere wishes for great success."

"The Fulbright offers our students a life altering experience" said Paula Bobrowski, associate dean in the College of Liberal Arts and chair of the campus-wide Fulbright screening committee. "This international experience will forever change their views of the world and help them to realize how they can make an impact on the world."

The Fulbright Program is the flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the U.S. government and is designed to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries. Recipients are selected on the basis of academic or professional achievement, as well as demonstrated leadership potential.

"I thoroughly enjoyed working with our scholars throughout the application process and their selection brings great credit upon Auburn University," said Paul Harris, associate director of the Honors College. "I am especially grateful to their faculty mentors Tom Nadar, associate professor of German; James Truman, assistant director of University Writing; David Maurer, associate professor of physics; and Alan Meyer, assistant professor of history, who all provided support and encouragement and wrote glowing letters of support on their behalf."

Auburn University senior receives Udall Scholarship for Excellence in National Environmental Policy


May 5, 2015

By: Wade Berry

Arthur “Joe” Jenkins, a senior from Madison, Alabama, with majors in zoology and mechanical engineering, has been awarded a 2015 Morris K. and Stewart L. Udall Scholarship for Excellence in National Environmental Policy – one of 48 Udall Scholarships awarded nationwide and the only recipient from the State of Alabama.

Udall Scholars are selected on the basis of commitment to careers in the environment, leadership potential and academic achievement. Jenkins has devoted his personal and professional life to becoming a leader in combating environmental crises in Alabama. For the past two years, he has conducted year-round funded research for the Alabama Natural Heritage Program at Auburn University and the U.S. Forest Service on two of Alabama's endemic and endangered species, the flattened musk turtle (Sternotherus depressus) and the black warrior waterdog (Necturus alabamenis) in the Bankhead National Forest.

Jenkins' research, under the direction of James Godwin at the Alabama Natural Heritage Program and Craig Guyer in the College of Sciences and Mathematics' Department of Biological Sciences, is the most extensive study to date on the flattened musk turtle, and his results will play a key role in updating conservation plans for the two species.

According to Janice Barrett, outreach coordinator of Wild South, “Joe is completely and whole-heartedly engaged in environmental protection. He has shown maturity, unwavering leadership, dedication, intelligence and skill in all the ways he has engaged with Wild South and it's always a pleasure to work with him. This world is becoming a better place because of Joseph's commitment to conservation and the sharing of his knowledge and passion.”

“It is an absolute honor to be recognized for my work with such a distinguished award,” Jenkins said. “Everyone in Dr. Guyer's lab has been incredibly welcoming and an invaluable resource over the past three years, and I am immensely thankful to James Godwin for providing me with the opportunity to work with these amazing creatures. I am also grateful to Dr. Paul Harris in the Honors College for encouraging me to apply for this award and for supporting me throughout the arduous application process.”

Two Auburn University juniors named Goldwater Scholars


April 27, 2015

By: Wade Berry

AUBURN UNIVERSITY – Auburn University juniors Christy Pickering and Connor Dobson have been chosen as 2015 Barry M. Goldwater Scholars, an honor bestowed on approximately 300 students nationwide each year. The scholarship is widely considered the most prestigious award in the United States for undergraduates in science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines.

Pickering, a Huntsville, Alabama, native, and Dobson, from Jacksonville, Florida, are in the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering and also in the Honors College. They are fellows in the undergraduate research program and conduct research with Robert “Rusty” Arnold, an associate professor in the Department of Drug Discovery and Development within the Harrison School of Pharmacy.

Pickering's research investigates a novel method to encapsulate gold nanoparticles within the aqueous core of liposomes and improve tumor targeting. These novel multifunctional gold-lipidic drug carriers may lead to an increase in efficacy and reduce toxicity of chemotherapeutic drugs used to fight cancer.

Dobson's research examines the synthesis of multifunctional gold nanoclusters that can be used in combination with stealth nanoparticles to improve cancer detection and drug delivery. Dobson recently took first place for his poster presentation in the Food, Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology section at the American Institute for Chemical Engineers annual meeting in Atlanta.

“With the hundreds of undergraduates conducting research across Auburn's campus, we are so pleased and honored that Connor and Christy have achieved recognition as Goldwater Scholars and offer our congratulations to them both along with Dr. Arnold, their faculty mentor,” said Melissa Baumann, Auburn University assistant provost for undergraduate studies and director of the Honors College.

“Christy and Connor are two exceptional students that have excelled academically and developed research projects that combine their passion for chemical engineering and biomedical research” Arnold said. “They show genuine enthusiasm and interest in addressing a critical limitation associated with the effective delivery of chemotherapeutic agents. It has been a privilege to have Christy and Connor contributing to our research efforts. I look forward to hearing about all their successes in their future endeavors.”

“I am humbled to have been selected, and it really reflects the wealth of opportunities and incredible group of faculty here at Auburn who have provided mentoring and guidance in my undergraduate studies,” Dobson said.

“I am incredibly honored to have been recognized by such a prestigious award" Pickering said. “Conducting undergraduate research has opened up my passion for pharmaceutical research and continues to challenge me. By working with Dr. Arnold, my skills and knowledge have grown tremendously, and I am excited about the opportunities available. I am thankful for my professors and the Honors College for supporting me throughout the lengthy application process.”

In addition to Pickering and Dobson's selection, Natasha Narayan, an Honors College sophomore from Auburn majoring in biochemistry in the College of Sciences and Mathematics, received an honorable mention during the 2015 Goldwater selection process, one of only 50 students nationwide given this distinction. Under the guidance of Bradley Merner, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Narayan's research is focused on the development of short, streamlined, synthetic approaches to creating tricyclic nucleic acids.

The Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship Program was established to provide scholarships to outstanding students who intend to pursue careers in mathematics, the natural sciences and engineering. Each scholarship covers eligible expenses up to a maximum of $7,500 annually for undergraduate tuition, fees, books and housing. In awarding scholarships, the foundation of trustees considers the nominee's field of study and career objectives along with the extent to which that individual has the commitment and potential to make a significant contribution to the field of science or engineering.

“It was a pleasure assisting all four of our Goldwater applicants,” said Paul Harris, associate director of the Honors College. “They represent the very best of what my office looks for in prestigious scholarship applicants: an intellectually curious nature, a sincere desire to learn for learning's sake and a 'can-do, will-do' attitude. They make our Auburn Family proud.”