Department of Geology and Geography www.auburn.edu/ANIMAL
 

Auburn Noble Isotope Mass Analysis Laboratory
Department of Geology and Geography

 ANIMAL SLIDES: <Researchers><Development><Test Data>
    EQUIPMENT 
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The mass spectrometer for ANIMAL is a 10-cm, 90 sector instrument with second order focusing (after Cross, 1951). The spectrometer has a single electron multiplier detector (ETP discrete dynode type), housed in a standard reducing cross (right). The source is based on a standard 2.75" cube. Note that there are two pairs of coils for the electromagnet-analyzer, and each is controlled with a 12-bit controller. The larger set of coils is kept in constant-current mode sufficient for a field of ~ 3100 Gauss (sufficient to being mass 35 to the detector, when operating at 2 kV). The smaller set of coils is under computer control, and when fully energized can increase the field to ~ 3500 Gauss (sufficient for ~ m/e=40.5 @ 2 kV). The total spectrometer volume (including an appendage getter-pump) is about 400 cc.

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The extraction line has a volume of about 400 cc. An air pipette (with pneumatic valves) and a turbo pump connect to the extraction line underneath the table.

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The operation of the laser system, extraction line, and analysis are fully automated, through a Labview program. 

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View of the Nier-type electron impact source (after Wallington) and filament through a Pyrex window on the source block (a standard 2.75” UHV cube). The source is spring-loaded, and is guided with pins to rest on a plate to the right. Note the external source magnet housings above and below the source.


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A second view of the ion source, with the beginning of the flight tube at the right

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Early development and testing of the ‘flying optic’ design for the laser sample chamber. The laser beam (from a He-Ne steering laser in this case) comes from below the table through a hole in the rail (to the left) and is directed down into the sample chamber.
 

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View of the optical path for the laser at a later stage of lab development

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View of the optical path for the laser at a later stage of lab development.

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Heating and sample chamber bakeout to ~ 150 C with an IR heat lamp.
 

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Heating and sample chamber bakeout to ~ 150 C with an IR heat lamp.

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