Classes


FALL SEMESTERS

Prokaryotic Molecular Genetics: BIOL5260 / BIOL6260

  • Prerequisites:  BIOL3000 (Genetics), BIOL3200 (General Microbiology), *BCHE5180 (Biochemistry - recommended)
  • Course Objectives:
    • I developed this course as an introductory bacterial genetics class designed to teach students both the classical and molecular approaches to study bacterial genetics.  Some of the materials covered include genes and genetic elements, gene organizations, mechanisms of gene regulation, transposable elements and insertion sequences, mutations and mutant analysis, recombination, plasmids, phages and various techniques used for genetic analyses of a prokaryotic organism.  Upon completion of the course, students should have basic understanding at the molecular level of the various factors that affect the biology, adaptation and evolution of prokaryotic organisms, and a broad range of technical approaches to perform genetic analyses. Scientific education involves active discussions and thus I encourage all students to be active in questions and class discussions to enhance critical thinking.  


Undergraduate Seminar in Microbiology: BIOL4950

  • Course Objectives:
    • I developed this course to teach students to dissect and understand the primary literature. In this course, students are taught how to give professional scientific presentations, lead discussions, and to question and dissect every piece of data in the primary literature. Many of the classes I took at both the University of Chicago and the University of Wisconsin were based on small discussion classes (what many are now calling “flipped classroom”) and I believe this is one of the most effective methods of teaching students to solve problems.


SPRING SEMESTERS

Microbial Physiology: BIOL5210 / BIOL6210

  • Prerequisites:  BIOL3200 (General Microbiology), CHEM2080 (Organic Chemistry), *BCHE5180 (Biochemistry - recommended)
  • Course Objectives:
    • I developed this course to teach students about the physiologic and metabolic processes that govern the life of prokaryotic organisms. Given the vast scope of the material but limited time, the class focuses on the general processes with occasional foray into special cases that may apply to a particular organism. The students learn the basic cellular make up of a prokaryotic cell, growth physiology, membrane and cytosol bioenergetics, catabolic and anabolic pathways, solute transport, protein secretion, homeostasis, as well as the survival strategies and mechanisms of prokaryotic organisms. The course emphasizes understanding the biological mechanisms in lieu of simple memorization of facts to encourage students to think as scientists.


Undergraduate Seminar in Microbiology: BIOL4950

  • Course Objectives:
    • I developed this course to teach students to dissect and understand the primary literature. In this course, I teach students how to give professional scientific presentations, lead discussions, and to question and dissect every piece of data in the primary literature. Many of the classes I took at both the University of Chicago and the University of Wisconsin were based on small discussion classes (what many are now calling “flipped classroom”) and I believe this is one of the most effective methods of teaching students to solve problems.
  Sang-Jin Suh © Auburn University 2012. All rights reserved