Scream Into Fluent Reading

Growing Independence and Fluency

By: Bess Findley

 

Rationale:

        Although decoding is a vital skill for students to use to learn to read, because it is such a slow, tedious skill to acquire, it negatively affects reading comprehension skills. Fluency instruction is a tool that teachers can use to speed this process up.  The automatic word recognition that fluency provides helps turn new, unfamiliar words into sight words. The repeated reading method of fluency instruction is ideal to help students move from the slow decoding process to automatic, effortless reading. This lesson targets reading strategies that build sight words through crosschecking for meaning, repeated reading of text, and charting progress in paired partner reading to maintain motivation for students to re-read.

 

Materials:

Fluency graphs for each child with fun stickers

Fluency checklist

Class set of Marvin Gets MAD! By: Joseph Theobald

Reader response form

 

Partner Reading Progress

Total words in chapter: ______ words

 

Reader: ______________________

 

Checker:______________________

1

_______ words

in ______ seconds.

2

_______ words

in ______ seconds.

3

_______ words

in ______ seconds.

Smoothest sounding turn number: _________

Turn number with fewest mistakes: _________

 

Name: _____________________

Reader Response

Directions: Read and answer the questions with at least one complete sentence.

Questions:

Answers:

1.   What would you do if your friend took something that you wanted while you were asleep?

 

_________________________

_________________________

_________________________

_________________________

_________________________

_________________________

_________________________

 

2.   Why do you think Marvin started to get less mad when he was all alone underground?

 

_________________________

_________________________

_________________________

_________________________

_________________________

_________________________

_________________________

 

3.   What do you think Marvin should do now that he has found a pear that he cannot reach?

 

_________________________

_________________________

_________________________

_________________________

_________________________

_________________________

_________________________

 

 

 

Procedures:

Explain the activity:
Say: "Today we are going to work on learning to read as smoothly and naturally as you talk by learning how to pick up speed while you're reading. When you can read as if you were talking, it is easier to become interested in the story by understanding the words you are reading."

Model fluent and non-fluent reading:
Say: "I want you to listen to me as I read a short passage two times. Make sure you are listening because once I am finished, I am going to take a vote on which time you think I sounded better. (1) One perfect morning Marvin and Molly /f-o-nd/ found a tree full "Hmmmm. Marvin and Molly fond a tree full? (found makes more sense than fond. I am having some trouble with some of these new words so I have to finish the sentences to see if I can figure them out.) of big, /j-/u/-/k/-y/ oh, juicy apples. "Let me try this passage again. One perfect morning Marvin and Molly found a tree full of big, juicy apples."

(ask for a show of hands to take the vote) "Who thinks I sounded better when I read the passage the first time? Now who thought I sounded better the second time? Why did the second time sound better? Exactly! I didn't have to stop to figure out what any of the words were."

Review a strategy:
Say: "Who noticed what strategy I used when I could not get a word while I was reading? That's right, I used crosschecking! I finished the sentence to see if I could figure out the correct pronunciation of some of the tough words I didn't recognize, that had difficult vowel pairs like the "ou" in found or the "ui" in juicy. I tried to pronounce them at first, but they didn't sound like words I have ever heard of. Once I finished the sentence, I could figure out what the words were, like found instead of fond, and juicy instead of juky.

Practice together:
Say: "Now we are going to read the next part of the passage together. I see a few tough new words in the next part of the passage, so let's see if we can figure them out."
(choral read:) "There was one apple that Marvin really wanted but no matter how high he jumped, he couldn't quite reach it." I heard some of you having trouble with the word high, but you used the rest of the sentence to figure it out! Great Job!"

Motivate to read:
Say: Let me tell you a little bit about the two silly sheep in this story before we go any further. Marvin has his eye on a particular apple from a big tree that he wants, but he cannot reach it. After Marvin wakes up from his nap, he realizes that Molly has eaten the apple that he wanted so badly. Marvin becomes angry with Molly. I wonder how Marvin and Molly work this problem out.

Explain the new procedure for paired practice:
(while explaining what students will be doing, write the directions as steps on the board for students to refer back to throughout paired practice)

Say: "Listen while I explain what you are going to do next. I will write the steps on the board, so if you forget what to do next look to the board for a reminder."

 

"Pair up with your reading buddy."

"One partner from each pair come get two (2) "Partner Reading Progress" checklists, and two (2) "Reader Response" forms from the front table, and then return to your special reading places. While one reader is grabbing the forms, the other partner will need to count all the words in the chapter. Record the number of words at the top of your "Partner Reading Progress" checklist."

 "Next, each partner will take three (3) turns reading the chapter out loud to each other. While one partner reads the chapter, the other will use the stopwatch to time the reader's reading speed, and record the three reading times on the "Partner Reading Progress" checklist. Be sure to pay attention to reader's mistakes during each reading, and record each mistake with a tally mark like this." (model how to use tally marks to tally mistakes on the board)

"After you your partner has completed all three readings, subtract the total number of tallied mistakes from total number of words for each reading. Place these number in the section of the "Partner Reading Progress" checklist that looks like this." (write  "_____ words in ____ seconds" on the board for students to see)

"After you measure each other's reading progress, decide and record which reading turn your partner read the smoothest, and which reading turn your partner had the fewest errors."

"Next, you and your partner can discuss the answers to the questions on the "Reader Response" form, but each partner needs to complete a separate form. Once you have both completed both the "Partner Reading Progress" checklist and the "Reader Response" forms, please turn them into me at my desk."

"When you turn in your papers, you will receive a graph and three stickers. Once I calculate your three reading rates, your stickers will go in the time spaces on your "Reading Rate" charts to show your reading rates."

"After your reading rates have been marked, please pin your "Reading Rate" charts to the fluency poster on the bulletin board in our reading corner."

 

Assessment:

 

Name: ____________________

Grading Rubric

 

Points Earned

Points Possible

Student followed directions for completing forms.

______

1

Student improved in speed.

______

2

Student improved in accuracy.

______

2

Student answered all three (3) questions with complete sentences.

______

3

Student answers are accurate/appropriate.

______

2

 

Total Points Earned:

Total Points Possible:

_____

10

 

Name: ____________________

Reading Rate

81+ words

 

 

 

76-80 words

 

 

 

71-75 words

 

 

 

66-70 words

 

 

 

61-65 words

 

 

 

56-60 words

 

 

 

50-55 words

 

 

 

WPM

1

2

3

 

References:

 

Book:

Theobald, Josesph. (2008). Marvin Gets MAD!. New York: Scholastic Inc.

 

Image:

http://www.lovereading4kids.co.uk/book/3157/Marvin-Gets-Mad-by-Joseph-Theobald.html

 

Lessson Design Resources:

Geri Murray, "Reading is a Breeze!" http://www.auburn.edu/~murrag1/murraygf.htm

 

 

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