Scholarships Checklist

News and Events

We routinely post exciting Auburn news, stories, and events as they pertain to scholarships, scholarship recipients, and enrollment.

  • Auburn pharmacy student selected for prestigious internship at Mayo Clinic
  • Auburn University senior named Gates Cambridge Scholarship finalist
  • Auburn senior Patrick Donnan named Marshall Scholar, one of 40 in United States
  • Auburn University senior, recent grad named Rhodes Scholar finalists
  • Auburn University graduate receives History Scholar Award
  • Auburn University junior named Harry S. Truman Scholar
  • Auburn junior named Barry M. Goldwater Scholar

Auburn pharmacy student selected for prestigious internship at Mayo Clinic


1:29 PM, March 10, 2014

AUBURN UNIVERSITY – For most students, summer is a time to relax and recharge, maybe take a class or two. For most students at the Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy, the summer also includes a two-week pharmacy practice rotation. But second-year pharmacy student Elizabeth Wood will spend her summer working at one of the most prestigious hospitals in the country.

Wood, a native of Vestavia Hills, Ala., will spend the summer in Rochester, Minn., at Mayo Clinic. She was selected as one of four students nationwide to work in the clinic’s outpatient pharmacy program.

“When I found out I was selected for the program, I was so excited and in absolute awe,” said Wood. “Mayo Clinic has such a wealth of opportunities, and I can’t wait to see what experiences I’ll have this summer.”

While internships are not required for Auburn pharmacy students, Wood said she saw the opportunity as an important one for helping her reach her long-term goals.

“I applied to two programs, Johns Hopkins and Mayo. I was not sure if I was going to be competitive for them or not, but I thought ‘why not go for it,’” Wood said. “I am interested in doing a residency eventually, so I thought it would be good to get clinical experience beyond working in a retail setting over the summer.

“For this program in particular, I was attracted to the outpatient setting because that is what I am interested in. I want to work in ambulatory care or in a clinic someday and this program is going to allow me to shadow an ambulatory care pharmacist with preceptors, work in all the different outpatient pharmacies they have at the Mayo Clinic and I will get to do a project and learn from the preceptors that are there.” Mayo Clinic’s outpatient pharmacies employ about 200 people, including approximately 60 pharmacists. The pharmacies operate seven days a week and provide a variety of pharmaceutical services, including patient counseling, pharmacy specialty practices, investigational drug studies, patient education programs, prescription compounding, drug information programs, in-service education and pharmacy and therapeutics formulary committee support.

The Pharmacy Internship Clinic/Outpatient program provides a number of experiences related to the unique practice of each outpatient pharmacy located on the Mayo Clinic campus in Rochester. The program provides a variety of experiences, including providing patient counseling on medication, working with a pharmacist preceptor to gain hands-on experience with reviewing doctors’ orders, entering orders and participating in pharmacists’ interventions, providing drug information to health care providers and medical writers, training in the pharmacy compounding department and preparing a presentation for staff pharmacists on a topic related to outpatient pharmacy.

“I have shadowed a lot of clinical pharmacists and that has really shown me that I am interested in ambulatory care and I thought the outpatient program would be a good fit for me,” said Wood. “Another big thing is that Minnesota is one of the more progressive states for pharmacists. They have more responsibilities, including the opportunity to offer clinical services. I thought it would be good to go off far away and get some experiences that I could not necessarily get as of now in Alabama.”

Also included in the internship curriculum are mini-rotations of one to two days to acquaint the interns with specialty practices in the hospital or outpatient pharmacy. Available specialty practices to choose from may include anticoagulation, cardiac surgery, cardiology, critical care, drug information, hematology/oncology, hospice, medication therapy management, neurology, nutrition support, operating room, organ transplantation, patient education, pediatrics, psychiatry and surgery.

The application process for the internship runs from November until January. Wood said she did her phone interview with Mayo Clinic on Jan. 28, Auburn’s first snow day of the year. By the following Friday, she had an offer.

Along with the traditional application, phone interview and recommendation letters, Wood also had to submit a letter of intent on why she should be selected for the internship. She outlined her accomplishments at Auburn, but also discussed how the clinical work offered at Mayo Clinic plays into her future plans.

“I talked about my five-year career goal, which is basically to pursue a post-graduate year one residency and a post-graduate year two residency, potentially specializing in ambulatory care, though I am not exactly sure what specialty area beyond that at this point,” Wood said. “Eventually, I would like to work in a clinic setting, maybe also for a school of pharmacy as a professor and precept students, but also see patients at the same time.”

In her two years at the Harrison School of Pharmacy, she has been a supplemental instruction leader for Drugs and Diseases I and II, an HSOP Ambassador, president-elect of the Student College of Clinical Pharmacy and a member of American Pharmacists Association Academy of Student Pharmacists and Auburn University Student Society of Health-System Pharmacy.

She earned the Phi Kappa Phi Outstanding First Professional Year Award last year and is a recipient of the Harrison School of Pharmacy Golf Tournament Scholarship.

Written by Matt Crouch.

Contact: Matt Crouch, Harrison School of Pharmacy, (334) 844-8310 (mcrouch@auburn.edu); or
Mike Clardy, Office of Communications and Marketing, (334) 844-9999 (clardch@auburn.edu)

Auburn University senior named Gates Cambridge Scholarship finalist


9:19 AM, January 17, 2014

AUBURN UNIVERSITY –Auburn University senior Mary-Catherine Anderson of Huntsville has been named a finalist for the Gates Cambridge Scholarship to do post-graduate work at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom.

Anderson, a senior in cellular and microbial biology in Auburn’s College of Sciences and Mathematics, has a perfect 4.0 grade-point average and has conducted research under the direction of Mike Squillacote, an associate professor in the Department of Chemistry. She will graduate in May and, if awarded the scholarship, will pursue a master’s degree at Cambridge in biological anthropology with a focus on human development and epidemiology.

This is the second consecutive year an Auburn student has been named a finalist. Last year, Paul Bergen, a 2012 graduate, was named Auburn’s third Gates Cambridge Scholar. The scholarship program is funded by Bill and Melinda Gates through the Gates Cambridge Trust. Nearly 1,000 students and recent graduates from the United States applied this year; the trust has invited only 90 to interview in Seattle in late January and early February for 40 available scholarships.

“We are proud and excited that Mary-Catherine has joined recent Auburn graduates in being named a Gates Cambridge finalist,” said Melissa Baumann, Auburn assistant provost and director of the Honors College. “She is dedicated to Auburn’s land-grant tradition of improving the lives of the people of Alabama and the world, and her studies at Cambridge will focus on biological anthropology and improving health care delivery for underserved populations.”

In addition to academic achievements, Anderson is an accomplished blue-grass musician, having produced a self-titled extended play musical album of her own songs. For the past three years, she has performed concerts at Magnolia Place Assisted Living Home and has logged hundreds of hours as a volunteer at Bonaparte’s Retreat, a dog rescue facility in Nashville founded by Grammy Award winner and Country Music Hall of Famer Emmy Lou Harris.

“The Mary-Catherine I have come to know and respect should first and foremost be described as a humanitarian, scholar and musician, a genuinely kind and thoughtful young woman with a true servant’s heart,” Harris said. “She is an exceptional young lady on an amazing journey, and I have been blessed to be a part of that journey.”

Paul Harris, Auburn’s associate director for national prestigious scholarships, said, “Mary-Catherine has not only taken the time to thoroughly research her proposed program of study at Cambridge, she has also developed close relationships with the biological anthropology faculty at Cambridge.”

Gates Cambridge Scholarships are awarded to college students and recent graduates based on four criteria: intellectual ability; leadership capacity; a desire to use their knowledge to contribute to society throughout the world by providing service to their communities and applying their talents and knowledge to improve the lives of others; and demonstrating a good fit between the applicants’ abilities and aspirations to the graduate program.

Contact: Mike Clardy, Office of Communications and Marketing, (334) 844-9999 (clardch@auburn.edu); or
Charles Martin, Office of Communications and Marketing, (334) 844-9999 (marticd@auburn.edu)

Auburn senior Patrick Donnan named Marshall Scholar, one of 40 in United States


2:26 PM, November 15, 2013

AUBURN UNIVERSITY –Auburn University senior Patrick Donnan has been named a recipient of the prestigious Marshall Scholarship, becoming one of only 40 U.S. students selected to attend their choice of university in the United Kingdom.

“We are very proud of Patrick, both for his accomplishments at Auburn and for his being named a Marshall Scholar,” said Melissa Bauman, Auburn University assistant provost and director of the Honors College. “He has displayed great leadership in the classroom and the laboratory and in advancing science in the community.”

Auburn native Donnan, who has a 3.98 grade-point average, is a student in the Honors College double-majoring in physics and music, concentrating on the bassoon, and minoring in mathematics. He is also a 2013 Barry M. Goldwater Scholar.

“I am truly humbled,” Donnan said. “Receiving the Marshall Scholarship is the culmination of all the work that my professors and Honors College staff have invested in me these past three years at Auburn. Even if I did not receive the award, going through the application process was beneficial in itself as it helped me grow as a person.

“I am looking forward to continuing my research in theoretical physics at Oxford and becoming a good ambassador for the United States and Auburn while abroad.”

Donnan conducts research in Auburn’s College of Sciences and Mathematics as a member of the theoretical and computational atomic physics group. He is an editor of the Auburn University Journal of Undergraduate Studies and has co-authored four peer-reviewed publications, one of which was published in Nature: The International Weekly Journal of Science.

“Patrick embodies a near ideal example of balance. He is an accomplished musician and an accomplished young scientist,” said Professor Ed Thomas, the Lawrence C. Wit Professor in the College of Sciences and Mathematics and one of Donnan’s research professors. “He has found a way to blend both of his passions into a seamless whole. Patrick not only has talent, but he has the dedication and self-awareness to put forth the effort and hard work to allow those talents to mature.”

Paul Harris, associate director for national prestigious scholarships in the Honors College, said, “I thoroughly enjoyed working with Patrick throughout the application process. He represents the very best of Auburn University and his generation. As a double major in physics and music, he is not only bright and intellectually engaging, but he also gives generously of his time and talents whether promoting research among his fellow physics majors or sharing his love for music as a member of the Auburn symphonic band.

The Marshall Scholarship program was established in 1953 by an act of British Parliament in honor of U.S. Secretary of State George C. Marshall as an expression of Britain’s gratitude for economic assistance received through the Marshall Plan after World War II. The program is overseen by the Marshall Aid Commemoration Commission. Approximately 900 students are endorsed annually for the scholarship by their respective universities, for which 40 scholarships are awarded nationwide.

Contact: Mike Clardy, Office of Communications and Marketing, (334) 844-9999 (clardch@auburn.edu); or
Charles Martin, Office of Communications and Marketing, (334) 844-9999 (marticd@auburn.edu)

Auburn University senior, recent grad named Rhodes Scholar finalists


3:10 PM, November 4, 2013

Auburn University senior Patrick Donnan and 2012 graduate Ashton Richardson have been named finalists for the prestigious Rhodes Scholarship for an opportunity to study at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. If selected, they would be among only 32 U.S. students to receive the honor.

Donnan will interview in Birmingham as part of Rhodes District 7, while Richardson, now a veterinary student at Texas A&M University, will interview in Houston as part of District 8. The interviews will take place Nov. 22-23.

Approximately 1,000 students are endorsed annually for the scholarship by their respective universities, with 200 being named finalists. The criteria include high academic achievement, integrity of character, a spirit of unselfishness, respect for others, potential for leadership and physical vigor.

Donnan and Richardson are Auburn’s sixth and seventh Rhodes Scholar finalists since 2009, including Jordan Anderson who was named a Rhodes Scholar that year. Richardson was also a finalist last year while at Auburn and was re-nominated by Auburn this year.

“Ashton and Patrick have excelled throughout their academic careers,” said Melissa Bauman, Auburn University assistant provost and director of the Honors College. “They have earned many honors due to commitment and hard work and are excellent representatives for the Auburn family. We are thrilled about the possibility of adding the Rhodes Scholar title to their list of accomplishments.”

Auburn native Donnan, who has a 3.98 grade-point average, is a student in the Honors College double-majoring in physics and music, concentrating on the bassoon, and minoring in mathematics. He is also a 2013 Barry M. Goldwater Scholar and was recently named a finalist for the highly selective Marshall Scholarship.

He conducts research in the College of Sciences and Mathematics as a member of the theoretical and computational atomic physics group. He is an editor of the Auburn University Journal of Undergraduate Studies and has co-authored four peer-reviewed publications, including articles in Nature: The International Weekly Journal of Science.

Upon graduation from Auburn in 2014, he aims to complete a doctorate in theoretical atomic physics and ultimately become a physics professor. If awarded the Rhodes, Patrick will work with faculty at the Center for Quantum Computation at Oxford.

Richardson, a former linebacker on the Auburn Tigers football team, majored in animal sciences with a concentration in pre-veterinary medicine in Auburn’s College of Agriculture, earning a grade-point average of 3.94. He was a four-time SEC Academic Honor Roll honoree and winner of the 2012 Bobby Bowden Award, presented by the Fellowship of Christian Athletes to the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision player who best epitomizes a student-athlete.

A native of New Orleans, he grew up helping his father raise quarter horses and has aspirations to become an equine surgeon. He wrote his Honors College thesis under the direction of Reid Hanson, professor of equine surgery in Auburn’s College of Veterinary Medicine. Outside the classroom, Richardson volunteered for four years as a mentor at the Lee County Youth Development Center.

“Inside and outside the classroom, Ashton and Patrick stand with a select group of their peers,” said Paul Harris, associate director for national prestigious scholarships in the Honors College. “They are engaging scholars, world class researchers and kind souls. On top of their impressive grades, service and undergraduate research, Ashton was a four-year letterman on the Auburn football team and Patrick is an accomplished musician.”

The Rhodes Scholarships, founded in 1904, are the oldest international fellowships and are administered by the Rhodes Trust, a British charity established to honor the will and bequest of Cecil J. Rhodes.

Contact: Mike Clardy, Office of Communications and Marketing, (334) 844-9999 (clardch@auburn.edu); or
Charles Martin, Office of Communications and Marketing, (334) 844-9999 (marticd@auburn.edu)

Auburn University graduate receives History Scholar Award


1:13 PM, July 12, 2013

AUBURN UNIVERSITY – Recent Auburn University graduate Hannah Riordan, a native of Cornwall, Ontario, has received one of 15 History Scholar Awards given each year by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

The award recognizes outstanding graduating college seniors, selected from candidates across the United States, who have demonstrated academic and extracurricular excellence in American history or American studies. Selection is based on grades, letters of recommendation and writing samples.

Riordan, a history major and member of Auburn’s swimming and diving team, submitted an essay about how her experiences at Auburn stimulated her interest in the American Civil War and Canada’s role in the conflict.

Riordan traveled to New York City in June to participate in a series of events planned for the honorees, including meetings with eminent scholars, exclusive behind-the-scenes tours of historic archives and an awards dinner. Museum and archive visits included stops at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Gilder Lehrman Collection and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, with talks and discussions led by Kenneth T. Jackson, Khalil Gibran Muhammad and Adrienne Petty.

Riordan plans to continue studying Canada’s role in the American Civil War as a graduate history student at McGill University in Montreal this fall. She also will continue training as a competitive swimmer, with the goal of joining the Canadian national team.

While at Auburn, Riordan earned an array of athletic awards. She was an eight-time All-American and four-time SEC champion in the 200- and 400-meter freestyle relays, and she also swam for Canada in the 2010 Pan-Pacific Championships.

Fellow Auburn history major Jeffrey Lollar received the honor in 2012, making this the second consecutive year an Auburn University history major has received a History Scholar Award.

Founded in 1994, The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History is a nonprofit provider of K–12 teacher training and classroom resources. The institute’s programs, which include teacher seminars, the Affiliate Schools Program, online courses, traveling exhibitions and more, promote excellence in the teaching and learning of American history.

Contact: Vicky Santos, College of Liberal Arts, (334) 844-7186 (santovr@auburn.edu); or
Charles Martin, Office of Communications and Marketing, (334) 844-9999 (marticd@auburn.edu)

Auburn University junior named Harry S. Truman Scholar


10:00 AM, April 12, 2013

AUBURN UNIVERSITY – Auburn University Honors College student Azeem Ahmed has been awarded a Harry S. Truman Scholarship, one of the nation’s top academic awards bestowed on college juniors.

Ahmed, who is double-majoring in finance and economics and minoring in public health, is one of only 62 recipients nationwide selected by the Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation; he is the only recipient from the state of Alabama.

“This is a tremendous honor for Azeem and for Auburn University,” said Jay Gogue, Auburn University president. “He has been a champion in Auburn’s War on Hunger and for many other worthwhile causes, both locally and abroad. He is a remarkable student.”

“I am incredibly honored to be named a Truman Scholar,” Ahmed said. “I am so thankful to my family, professors, the Honors College staff and to everyone who assisted me in the practice interview sessions.”

Created in 1975 by an act of Congress, the Harry S. Truman Scholarship is awarded to select college juniors on the basis of four criteria: service on campus and in the community, commitment to a career in public service, communication ability and aptitude to be a “change agent,” and academic talent that would assure acceptance to a first-rate graduate school.

Scholars receive $30,000 toward their post-graduate education. In addition, they participate in leadership development programs and have opportunities for internships and employment with the federal government. Ahmed will travel to Liberty, Mo., in May to attend the Truman Scholars Leadership Week.

“Through his leadership in Campus Kitchens, the organization now serves over 1,200 meals a month in the community and has just started serving on campus,” said Harriet Giles, director of external relations for the College of Human Sciences. “He has collaborated with other student leaders and university administrators to open and run a much-needed, on-campus food pantry.”

Ahmed grew up in Auburn and began his undergraduate studies in 2009 at Auburn University as a dual-enrolled high school student. In high school he was the National Youth Ambassador for the March of Dimes.

In 2011 he traveled to Egypt as a World Food Programme health and nutrition summer intern and helped develop a national food program. He conducted more than 40 field visits and certified enough mills to produce 250,000 tons of vitamin-enriched rice. In 2012 he traveled to Bangladesh to work with the International Center for Diarrheal Disease Research. He helped create protocol for pediatric sepsis management, shadowed physicians and assisted with emergency triage of cholera victims.

“The first time I met Azeem I knew he was special,” said Paula Bobrowski, associate dean for research in the College of Liberal Arts, who led practice interview sessions for Ahmed. “He has a kind heart, great intellect and a wealth of enthusiasm. He simply shines and is destined to do great things that will help the less fortunate of this world.”

“Azeem’s clear commitment to servant leadership, solid grade point average and glowing letters of support made for a strong application,” added Paul Harris, associate director of the Honors College. “It is extremely gratifying to see someone with as much promise as Azeem Ahmed receive this recognition.”

Contact: Mike Clardy, Office of Communications and Marketing, (334) 844-9999 (clardch@auburn.edu); or
Charles Martin, Office of Communications and Marketing, (334) 844-9999 (marticd@auburn.edu)

Auburn junior named Barry M. Goldwater Scholar


1:43 PM, April 4, 2013

AUBURN UNIVERSITY – Patrick Donnan, an Auburn University Honors College student double-majoring in physics and music, has been chosen as a 2013 Barry M. Goldwater Scholar, an honor bestowed only to approximately 300 students nationwide each year. The scholarship is widely considered the most prestigious award in the United States for undergraduates in science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines.

Donnan, an Auburn native, conducts research with Professor Francis Robicheaux as part of the theoretical and computational atomic physics group in the College of Sciences and Mathematics’ Department of Physics.

“I am truly honored to have been awarded the Goldwater Scholarship,” Donnan said. “I have been working toward the Goldwater since I learned about it freshman year, and it’s a wonderful feeling to have accomplished that goal.”

Donnan’s research involves studying processes in atoms by using advanced computational methods. Specifically, his work examines Rydberg atoms, which appear in virtually every subfield of atomic physics and have widespread interest in the atomic physics research community. He has co-authored four peer-reviewed publications, including articles in the Auburn University Journal of Undergraduate Research and in Nature: The International Weekly Journal of Science, among others.

In May he will travel to Leipzig, Germany, to study at the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics. Upon graduation from Auburn, he aims to complete a doctorate in theoretical atomic physics and ultimately become a physics professor.

“Patrick is very enthusiastic about physics,” Robicheaux said. “He is very easy to work with and he has a good temperament for research. Setbacks don’t trouble him and if something gives problems, he works at it until the problems are fixed. His motivation and drive are incredibly high and he has the training and talents of a top scientist.”

Donnan, who has a 3.98 grade point average, is president of the Auburn chapter of the Society for Physics Students and a member of the Undergraduate Research Board. In addition, he is principal chair with the bassoon in the Auburn University Symphonic Band and a member of the Auburn Community Orchestra.

Auburn Honors College student Tyler Sutherland received honorable mention during the 2013 Goldwater Scholarship selection process, one of only 50 students nationwide to enjoy this distinction. He is majoring in physics and minoring in mathematics and works under the guidance of Stuart Loch, v associate professor of physics. Sutherland is also a tutor in the Loachapoka Afterschool Program, a member of the Undergraduate Research Board and a teaching assistant in the Department of Physics.

Originally from Huntsville, he will spend the summer in Cambridge, Mass., as an intern in the Harvard Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Summer Program.

“It was a pleasure assisting Patrick and Tyler with their Goldwater applications,” said Paul Harris, associate director of the Honors College. “I first met Patrick when he was enrolled in my Honors Human Odyssey Course during his freshman year and shortly thereafter I met Tyler. They represent the very best of what my office looks for in prestigious scholarship applicants: an intellectually curious nature, a sincere desire to learn for learning’s sake and a ‘can-do, will-do’ attitude.”

Contact: Mike Clardy, Office of Communications and Marketing, (334) 844-9999 (clardch@auburn.edu); or
Charles Martin, Office of Communications and Marketing, (334) 844-9999 (marticd@auburn.edu)