March, 2010
1. First Graduates Awarded Minor in Sustainability
2. Sustain-A-Bowl 2010
3. Green Lunch Series: Sustainable Landscaping and the Value of Trees
4. Auburn Hosts Hunger March to Montgomery and Hunger Summit
5. Auburn Awarded Tree Campus USA Recognition
6. Students Invited to Submit Grant Applications
7. Art in Agriculture
1. First Graduates Awarded Minor in Sustainability

In December 2009, Auburn University awarded its first minors in sustainability to three graduating seniors. The first recipients of the minor, Clay McInnis, Rafael Egües and Robert McAlister, began the minor together in fall 2008 and completed the capstone course a year later in fall 2009.

The minor, which is open to students in all majors, is a fifteen credit hour program that requires students to complete an introduction to sustainability class, a senior capstone in sustainability and nine additional electives, of which three are outside their major college. The first class introduces students to the core principles of sustainability: sustainable economic, environmental and equitable development, and covers such topics as energy, transportation, food, buildings and water. For the electives students are expected to take classes in at least two of the core areas. The capstone takes the form of a seminar with students designing their own research projects and meeting once a week in small groups with an advisor. Students are encouraged to relate the capstone project to their major and their future career and to engage with real-world projects where possible.

Student interest in the sustainability minor continues to grow. In fall 2009, thirty students took the introduction to sustainability class, and currently ten are taking the capstone course and will graduate with the sustainability minor in spring 2010.


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3. Green Lunch Series: Sustainable Landscaping and the Value of Trees

What: Monthly sustainability brown bag seminar

When: Wednesday, March 24, 2010, 12:00pm-1:00pm
Where: Student Center, room 2218

On Wednesday March 24, Dr. Art Chappelka from the Department of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences and Dr. Gary Keever from Horticulture will talk about the water conservation practices adopted by Auburn University Landscaping and the campus tree inventory that was recently completed. The tree inventory was conducted in partnership with the US Forest Service using a Forest Service model that has allowed Auburn to evaluate the ecological and financial services provided by the our campus trees. The results of the Auburn study will be used by the Forest Service to improve the efficiency of the model and help make it easier for other communities and campuses to evaluate their trees.

Previous Green Lunches in 2010 included a talk on climate change and national security by Dr. John Ackerman, Assistant Professor of National and International Security Studies, Air Command and Staff College, Maxwell AFB. On March 3 Dr. Wayde Morse gave a presentation, "Travel to Learn: Watershed Services in Costa Rica.”

The Green Lunch is an ongoing brown bag series sponsored by the Office of Sustainability to which guest speakers are invited to present on topics related to sustainability. The Green Lunch is open to students, staff, faculty and members of the community. Bring your lunch and join us.


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5. Auburn Awarded Tree Campus USA Recognition

In 2009, Auburn University applied to become a Tree Campus USA through the Arbor Day Foundation. The application was accepted and recognition of this honor took place during Alabama Arbor Week, the last week in February. Tree Campus USA is an honor bestowed on College and University campuses for effective campus tree management. The institutions awarded Tree Campus USA are recognized for their work with the broader community to help establish and foster healthy urban forests and engage students in campus and community forestry efforts through service learning opportunities.

Achieving Tree Campus USA status is the culmination of years of work and a recent concerted effort by Landscape services, the Departments of Forestry and Horticulture and the Arboretum.

Read more about the award at Auburn's Wire Eagle.


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7. Art in Agriculture

The spring 2010 series of Art in Agriculture began in January and will continue until May. The program, which began last year, is a collaboration between Auburn's College of Agriculture and the Department of Art that examines relationships between agriculture, food, the environment and natural resources. The theme of this year's program is Reclaiming Ground: Ag-Gardens-Art.

The series includes a variety of exhibitions, workshops, lectures, discussions and guided walks. For more information and for a schedule of events please visit the Art in Ag. website.


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2. Sustain-A-Bowl 2010

During February, almost 4,000 Auburn students in 30 residence halls competed in this year's Sustain-A-Bowl Championship, Auburn's annual resource competition. Beginning on February 1st and ending four weeks later on February 28th, Sustain-A-Bowl pitted the residence halls against one another to see which hall is the most sustainable. The competition challenges residents to reduce their electricity, water and waste over the course of the four weeks and to become involved in sustainability education and community building events.

The competition began in 2009, and in that year the 22 halls in the Quad and Hill together saved over $8,000 in just one month. This year, 2010, the eight new residence halls in the Village joined the competition, almost doubling the number of students involved in Sustain-A-Bowl.

Due to variations between the older and newer buildings, this year each area (the Quad, Hill and Village) were judged separately, producing three winners. It was a close race throughout February, with some halls racing ahead at the beginning and then loosing their lead as others halls found their stride. In the end, almost every hall managed to reduce their electricity and water usage and increase their recycling over the course of February, but at the last meter reading there were three clear winners: Oak Hall in the Village, Lupton in the Quad and Knapp on the Hill. The winners were presented with the Sustain-A-Bowl Trophy at an award ceremony at the Miller Gorrie Center, the first LEED certified building on campus, on March 9.

For more information on Sustain-A-Bowl, visit the Sustain-A-Bowl website.

To see the great collection of photos students sent in during Sustain-A-Bowl, visit the FaceBook page.

A special thank you to all our sponsors: Tiger Dining, Waste Management, Coca-Cola, Auburn Bookstore, Pottery Café, Gnu's Room Bookstore and Coffee House and Re-Invent.


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4. Auburn Hosts Hunger March to Montgomery and Hunger Summit
Hunger March

On March 27-29 Auburn University students will march the sixty miles from Auburn to the steps of the state capitol in Montgomery, sleeping overnight on church floors, developing blisters and bringing a demand to their representatives to end hunger. The march is being organized by the Committee of 19, the student organization that leads the War on Hunger campaign on campus. In 2004, through the Committee of 19 and the War on Hunger, Auburn became the originating member of Universities Fighting World Hunger (UFWH). UFWH is a program developed in 2004 by Auburn's College of Human Science and the United Nations World Food Programme dedicated to mobilizing students and universities around the world to help end hunger. Today, UFWH has grown to include 130 universities around the world.



Hunger Summit

On February 26-28, Auburn University and UFWH hosted the 5th Annual Hunger Summit at The Hotel at Auburn University and Dixon Conference Center. The summit brought together universities, NGOs, government agencies and corporations to discuss hunger, its causes and the work being done to fight it. Speakers included Roger Thurow, Wall Street Journal reporter and co-author of Enough: Why the World's Poorest Starve in an Age of Plenty and Tony Hall, former US representative and chairman of the Select Committee on Hunger, recent FAO ambassador and current director of the US-based Alliance to End Hunger. Along with speakers the summit also included panels, graduate student research posters, exhibits and a presentation by North Carolina State University of the 2nd annual Clinton Student Hunger Leadership Award.

For more information on UFWH and the minor in Hunger Studies offered by Auburn University, please visit the website.

Auburn and the UFWH are featured prominently in the cover story, “Feeding Mouths and Minds,” in the current edition of International Educator, the bimonthly journal published by NAFSA, the Association for International Educators. Read the article here.


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6. Students Invited to Submit Grant Applications

Closing date April 23, 2010.

Applications are now being accepted for the 2010 Clinton Global Initiative University (CGI U) Awards. The Clinton Global Initiative is an organization that aims to bring together world leaders to act on global challenges. CGI University is based on that model and brings together bright young minds with ideas on how to make a difference in five main areas: Education, Environment & Climate Change, Peace & Human Rights, Poverty Alleviation, and Public Health. Students at the undergraduate or graduate level can apply for grants in one of the five key areas to help them implement a project that will improve the lives of others around the world.

In 2009, the grants awarded ranged from $1,000 for construction materials for a service learning day, to $7,500 toward footballs and jerseys for a conflict resolution effort in Sierra Leone, to $10,000 for construction of a campus-based greenhouse in Eugene, Oregon.

The deadline for grant applications is April 23, 2010. For more details, visit the CGI U website.


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