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Electronic Text Sources

  • Bartleby.com "Great Books Online" This site provides full text versions of works by most of the well-known writers and many excellent reference books (Gray's AnatomyBartlett's Familiar Quotations, an encyclopedia, a dictionary, a thesaurus, a book of English usage, and Oxford's complete works of Shakespeare) in a very user-friendly format.
  • Bibliomania "Hundreds of searchable full text works of classic fiction, popular fiction, short stories, drama, poetry, dictionaries, research and religious texts." This site covers a wide variety, from classic fiction, short stories, drama, and poetry, to non-fiction and reference books.
  • British Women Romantic Poets, 1789-1832 "An Electronic Collection of Texts from the Shields Library University of California, Davis." This is a fairly small archive, but it is very well organized and documented.
  • The Women Writers Project is one of the pioneering efforts to make the work of early women writers available. Once at the site, click on "Women Writers Online."
  • A Celebration of Women Writers This site includes links to e-texts by hundreds of women writers, searchable by name, book title, century, and country.
  • Eighteenth-Century E-Texts This site is an extensive archive of Eighteenth-Century e-texts searchable by author's name and maintained by Jack Lynch.
  • Electronic Text Center This site belongs to the University of Virginia Library. This is an extensive database organized by subjects.
  • The English Server "The EServer's primary function is to publish texts in the arts and humanities. Our collections include art, architecture, drama, fiction, poetry, history, political theory, cultural studies, philosophy, women's studies and music." This site covers a huge variety of topics.
  • The Internet Classics Archive An archive of works by mainly classical Greek and Roman scholars including Aristotle, Plutarch, Homer, Euripides, Euclid, Xenophon, Hippocrates, Socrates, and Confucius.
  • The Luminarium This site covers medieval, renaissance, and seventeenth-century writers. It includes very detailed information about each writer in addition to the texts.
  • Project Gutenberg Free access to hundreds of books and plays in downloadable text files. Most are pre-1923 because of copyright laws.
  • Librivox This site provides audiobooks for download. Volunteers select a text in the public domain and record themselves reading to create a free audio version.
  • Lit2Go Maintained by the College of Education at the University of South Florida, this site provides Mp3 and PDF versions of texts in the public domain, along with reinforcement activities for students to complete.
  • University of Virginia E-Text Collection This site links to full text versions of works in the public domain. It provides scans of first edition texts with a typed transcription beneath each scan.
  • The Internet Archive: Text Archive This database offers over 10 million fully viewable texts. The Internet Archive partners with the Boston Public Library, the Library of Congress, and Lancaster County's Historical Society, among others, to provide these.
  • English Broadside Ballad Archive A project of the University of California, Santa Barbara, this archive makes available 17th century broadside ballads as scans, transcriptions, and recordings.
  • The John Milton Reading Room This site contains transcriptions of selections of Milton's prose and all of his poetry. Most of the texts have an introduction and annotations written by faculty and students of Dartmouth College.
  • The Shakespeare Quartos Archive This archive has scans and transcriptions of pre-1642 editions of Shakespeare's plays that were printed in quarto before the theatres closed in 1642. This is valuable for researchers who study variations in Shakespeare's plays.
  • Victorian Women Writers Project This site, maintained by Indiana University's Digital Library Program, makes available texts written by less recognized 19th century British women writers.
  • The William Blake Archive A collaboration between the Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities and the Carolina Digital Library and Archives, the archive offers high quality scans of Blake's first edition prints, paintings, and poems, in addition to his surviving correspondence.