FAQs

  1. How long does it take to complete the program?
    CRAH is truly a self-paced program. How quickly you can complete your training is based upon your ability to memorize, your dexterity, how familiar you might already be with some of the academics you must learn and the number of hours you can practice each day. Successful completion requires a motivated, disciplined student. Some students have completed their training in a year, but some students may take 18 months, 2 years or longer.

  2. When can I start my training?
    Immediately! This program has open enrollment, and the day you receive your materials, you may begin your training.
  3. Do you offer job placement?
    Absolutely! We have 100% placement. Every student who completes the training is guaranteed employment.
  4. Who are my instructors?
    Your Support Staff is comprised of licensed, credentialed court reporters, or captioners, or CART providers who have passed state and/or national certification examinations. Currently, all Support Staff have at least 20 years’ experience in these careers.

    The developer of the program has served on NCRA committees, published articles in the NCRA’s Journal of Court Reporting magazine, was a professional court reporter for 29 years, previously owned a traditional, accredited, NCRA-approved school, trained the first realtime writing court reporters in Africa, and passed three State CSR examinations at 225 wpm, the national RPR examination at 225 wpm, and the national RMR examination at 260 wpm. She also served on the NCRA Committee that develops the national RPR examination, and her test was chosen to be administered at the May, 2007 RPR exam. She is a Certified Program Evaluator (CPE) for the NCRA, serving on teams that evaluate traditional school programs, and she has served as a team member of the Southern Colleges and Schools accreditation commission evaluating traditional school programs. (Click here to read more about the developer of the program.)
  5. What theory will I learn?
    Realtime Reporting and Captioning Theory is taught in this program. It is the only NCRA-approved theory developed specifically for distance education students. It is the shortest, easiest, realtime writing theory available and the only theory that includes a DVD tutorial that correlates with each lesson in the Theory Manual. This theory offers options! To enable ALL students to be able to learn the theory, the author included multiple ways to write in steno to allow all students to choose the method easiest for them to memorize, write and read back.
  6. Are there any additional costs?
    There are no additional costs throughout your training, except all students must pay for their own steno pads for their steno machines. They are initially furnished 3 pads of paper. Thereafter, they must purchase their own paper. A box of 50 pads of paper costs approximately $47 plus shipping. Students may require anywhere from approximately 1-3 boxes of paper throughout their training. ALL court reporters, captioners, and CART providers must furnish their own CAT software when they begin working professionally. This software costs approximately $4800. The CAT software included in this program during the student’s training allows students 90 days after they begin working professionally to begin making $79 per month payments.
  7. How long will my internship last, and how does that work?
    When court reporting students can pass a Q&A test at 225 wpm, the Support Department will establish an internship for them in their area at hours that are convenient for them. The student is not paid. Students will attend court reporting assignments with professional court reporters, writing the assignment with them. They get to see in action what they have learned throughout their training. We recommend 40 hours of writing time on the steno machine, but it is up to the student to determine when they feel comfortable with their internship. If they wish to shorten it or extend it, they may. It will not interfere with a student’s current work. They may accept internship assignments immediately after work hours or later in the evening. They may accept an internship assignment this week and wait several weeks before they accept another. Students are able to intern at hours that will not interrupt their current work schedule.

    When captioning students can pass a 180 wpm literary test, prospective captioning employers are contacted to evaluate the student’s transcription. Their writing will be assessed, and captioning employers may offer them employment immediately or may make recommendations to them regarding their writing. Students’ writing may be assessed several times prior to employment.

    When a CART providing student can pass a 180 wpm literary test, prospective CART providing employers are contacted to assess the student’s writing and translation to see if they are ready to provide CART services. If so, they may be offered employment.
  8. Will I receive a Certificate?
    Yes, successful graduates in the court reporting program will receive a Certificate of Completion from Auburn University. However, approximately half the states in the United States require students to pass a state or national certification before they can work professionally. Most of those states accept the National Court Reporters Association Registered Professional Reporter (RPR) examination. However, some states require students to pass their own State examination referred to as a Certified Shorthand Reporter (CSR) exam or Certified Court Reporter (CCR) examination. This program will prepare students to pass any of those certification examinations.

    There is no state certification required for broadcast (closed) captioning or CART providing. Successful graduates in those programs will receive a Certificate of Completion from Auburn University.
  9. Do you accept international students?
    Yes, certainly, as a self-paced, distance education program you learn right in your home. We train students all over the world.
  10. How much do court reporters, captioners, and CART providers earn?
    It depends on the proficiency of the court reporter, captioner, and CART provider and whether they freelance, work as an official court reporter, provide CART or captioning, but many of them earn over $100,000 annually. We have many students who begin earning $65,000 to $80,000 annually and some who have earned $100,000 their first year, but again, there are many variables that affect income.
  11. Can I use a Mac computer?
    During the first half of training, yes, you may use a Mac computer. However, because all CAT (computer aided transcription) software programs are Windows based, when you begin the CAT software phase of your training, you will be required to either use a Windows-based computer or to partition off a segment of your Mac computer for Windows.
  12. What are the software or hardware requirements?
    Students need a computer and internet service to access their support.
  13. How does the program work?
    There are six components to the CRAH Program: Learning theory (how we write on the steno machine), building speed on the steno machine, learning academics for which ever career you choose, learning CAT (computer aided transcription) software that translates steno notes into English, certification preparation and internship.

    The program components are shipped to the student via UPS Ground in most cases. Students follow this regimen to learn the theory: (1) watch the lesson on the DVD Tutorial; (2) memorize the letters and words introduced in that lesson in the Theory Manual; (3) practice writing the letters and words by listening to an audio drill dictated for the lesson; and (4) take a short written test covering the lesson.

    To build speed, students follow a speed building practice regimen developed for each student by their Support Staff based upon the number of hours the student has available to practice each day. Each speed level contains audio practice materials and tests. All students are on the honor system. As the student is ready to take a test, the Support Staff will email them the answer sheet for their use in grading their exam.

    Students review the academics, take tests at the end of each lesson, and grade them utilizing the answer sheets on the page following the test.

    CAT (computer aided transcription) software is provided without charge during training for students who do not already own CAT software. Support for the CAT software is provided by the CAT software vendor. It is very similar to Microsoft Word, but it has the added feature of translating steno notes into English.
  14. Are there any federal student loans or grants available?
    This is a noncredit program and, therefore, federal student loans and grants are not available to pay for this training. However, in some states there may be Workforce grants, Vocational Rehabilitation grants, etc. that may pay for this training.

Last Updated: March 13, 2014