COSAM » News » Articles » 2017 » August

August



Mathematics alumna Angela Barlow named Graduate School dean at UCA

08/31/2017

COSAM alumna Angela Barlow was selected dean of the Graduate School at the University of Central Arkansas. In this role, Barlow will oversee UCA’s 62 graduate degrees and certificates.  “As graduate dean, I see my role as being a supporter of faculty who are providing transformative experiences for their students and an advocate for graduate students who want to influence the world in a positive way,” said Barlow. “My goal is to have UCA be the destination for excellence in graduate education.”  Barlow most recently served as director of the Mathematics and Science Education doctoral program at Middle Tennessee State University. She has held faculty positions at the University of Mississippi and University of West Georgia.  

Click here to read more...


Mathematics alumnus wins AIG’s Kaggle/Data Science competition

08/28/2017

COSAM alumnus, Man Peng, PhD, mathematics ’08, won the American International Group’s, or AIG, first Kaggle/Data Science competition. Peng works as a data scientist in personal insurance for AIG’s headquarters in New York, NY. Kaggle is the world’s leading data science competition platform—a platform that AIG leveraged to host as its first company-wide predictive modeling competition. More than 800 employees from 24 countries competed in the 11-week competition, which ran from late 2016 into early 2017.

Click here to read more...


Jenda and Johnson to give keynote lectures at SAMSA 2017

08/04/2017

Overtoun Jenda and Peter Johnson accept invitations to give keynote lectures at SAMSA 2017

Click here to read more...


Auburn University professor secures an additional $5 million to increase diversity in STEM workforce

08/03/2017

Auburn University’s Overtoun Jenda, assistant provost for Special Projects and Initiatives and professor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, secured an additional $5 million from the National Science Foundation for a five-year project that aims to diversify the workforce in the Black Belt region of Alabama by increasing the number of students from historically underrepresented groups who receive undergraduate and graduate degrees in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, or STEM. Jenda had previously secured $5 million in funding for projects aimed at increasing diversity in the STEM workforce, bringing his total to $10 million in the last year. The most recent grant is part of the National Science Foundation’s Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation, or LSAMP, which strives to assist universities and colleges in diversifying the nation’s STEM workforce by increasing the number of baccalaureate and graduate degrees awarded to populations historically underrepresented in STEM disciplines, including African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians and Native Pacific Islanders.

Click here to read more...


Auburn University’s Rural Medicine Program establishing quality healthcare in underserved Alabama areas

08/03/2017

In Alabama, all but five of the state’s 67 counties are on the federal list of medically underserved areas, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Sciences. Thirty-eight of those counties lack hospitals with labor and delivery service, and eight Alabama counties do not have hospitals at all. As a land-grant institution dedicated to increasing the quality of life for Alabama citizens, Auburn University is committed to helping place primary care physicians in the areas that need them most. The Rural Medicine Program is a partnership with the University of Alabama School of Medicine, or UASOM, with the goal of addressing and combatting the pressing need for more primary care physicians in rural areas of the state. Students in the program must be Alabama residents who have lived a minimum of eight years in a rural area of the state and are committed to returning to rural Alabama to begin their primary care practice after completing their training.

Click here to read more...


Chase Richburg selected COSAM’s 2017 Summer Graduation Marshal

08/03/2017

Chemistry major Chase Richburg, the son of two Auburn University graduates, was selected to be the 2017 College of Sciences and Mathematics Summer Graduation Marshal. Richburg will graduate from the Honors College with a 3.96 GPA and a bachelor’s degree in chemistry. “I always wanted to go to school at Auburn, and it's the only place I applied,” said Richburg. “I'm really an Auburn man, through and through.” During his undergraduate career, a bike wreck led him to conduct research with Byron Farnum, assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. The wreck resulted in major dental repairs, and Richburg’s dentist happened to be Farnum’s wife. Richburg mentioned he was interested in conducting undergraduate research, and she connected him with her husband.

Click here to read more...


Auburn University scientists release 26 Eastern indigo snakes into Conecuh National Forest as part of ongoing reintroduction effort

08/03/2017

As part of an ongoing species reintroduction effort, scientists at Auburn University, along with numerous state and national partners, released 26 threatened Eastern indigo snakes into Conecuh National Forest on Friday, July 14. The release is part of an on-going project, coordinated by the Auburn University Museum of Natural History’s Alabama Natural Heritage Program, to reestablish the Eastern indigo snake in its native, longleaf pine forest habitat in south Alabama. The Eastern indigo snake is the longest native snake in North America, and may reach a size of 8.5 feet and a weight of 11 pounds for males, and 6.5 feet and 6.5 pounds for females. A non-venomous, docile snake, the Eastern indigo gets its name from its lustrous, glossy, iridescent blue-black coloring of the head and body.

Click here to read more...