Permanent Residency

Policy and Guidelines

Auburn University will sponsor professional-level employees for US Permanent Residence if the employee is employed (or has been offered employment) in any full-time position considered to be permanent. The definition of "permanent" for the purpose of this policy is explained in detail below.

All permanent resident applications filed by Auburn University must be processed by, or directed by, the Office of International Programs. Hiring departments may not prepare or sign immigration documents or applications for Labor Certification related to permanent resident petitions. Outside attorneys may not prepare or file applications or petitions on behalf of Auburn University unless previously approved by the AU General Counsel. Hiring departments may not pay for immigration-related work performed by outside attorneys, except when arranged through the Office of International Programs and the AU General Counsel.

Permanent resident petitions will be processed based on an official request by the head or director of the department (or organizational unit) employing the employee, with approval by the college dean (if appropriate) and the Office of the Provost/VP for Academic Affairs or Office of the President.

The applications will be facilitated by the Office of International Programs through the AU counsel for immigration support. All processing and legal fees associated with the application will be arranged for in writing with the hiring department and beneficiary prior to the initiation of any petition.

University departments may not make promises to any non-tenure track employee or prospective employee concerning sponsorship for permanent residence until the request for sponsorship has been approved by all required administrative offices (including the Office of the Provost/President).

NOTE: AUBURN UNIVERSITY RESERVES THE RIGHT TO ESTABLISH INTERNAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR THE SUBMISSION, ADJUSTMENT AND MODIFICATION OR WITHDRAWAL OF ANY EMPLOYER BASED PETITIONS AT ANY TIME.

Last Updated: November 28, 2012