Alabama Gap Website

 


Project Year 04/05:

Land cover:  As part of our ongoing partnership with the Southeast Regional Gap Project, the Alabama Gap Analysis Project (AL-GAP) is responsible for all land cover mapping efforts within the East Gulf Coastal Plain (EGCP).  The land cover mapping is being developed in two phases of thematic detail.  In the first phase we are creating a general land cover map in cooperation with EROS Data Center’s (EDC) effort to develop second generation National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD).  For the second phase, we will refine the NLCD to create a more detailed vegetation map based on the Terrestrial Ecological Systems, described by NatureServe (Comer et al. 2003, hereafter referred to as Systems).  This Systems map will represent the terrestrial habitat communities and provide a foundation for GAP vertebrate modeling and biodiversity assessments in the EGCP.  In Fiscal Year 2004 the NLCD layer for the EGCP (figure 1) was completed.  In spring 2004 we initiated field work and collected data for over 60% of the Systems found within the EGCP.  In addition, in January 2005 we began to evaluate methods for developing the Systems level map, which included Categorical and Regression Tree Analysis (CART), logistic regression, and spatial query analyses.  We will continue field work and compilation of training data for the remaining Systems within the EGCP through 2005. 

Animal modeling: Development of animal models continued in 2004.  As part of the Southeast Regional Gap Project we created regional range extents for 257 species of terrestrial vertebrates.  In May 2004, we worked with project staff from the North Carolina and Georgia GAP labs to conduct an internal review and finalize range extents for the 608 species proposed for the Southeast Regional Project.  In June 2004, we commenced literature reviews for generating unified habitat relationships for the region, and in the winter of 2004-05 we began developing the lists of spatial parameters and habitat relationship models for each species.  The habitat modeling will continue throughout 2005 and we anticipate producing preliminary predicted distribution maps by the summer of 2005.  We plan to initiate expert review workshops in fall 2005.

Land stewardship mapping: Stewardship mapping is also ongoing.  Digital boundary files and ownership data have been compiled from various public and private agencies through cooperative arrangements.  We will continue updating this layer for the duration of the project and will complete the final map in early 2006 to provide the most up-to-date data for our gap analysis.

Analysis: Not applicable at this time.

Other accomplishments and innovations:  
AL-GAP has partnered with the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries to develop a map of high-priority terrestrial habitats to be used in support of the state’s Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy.
Also in 2004, our graduate research assistant, John Hogland, identified an innovative modeling method to classify longleaf ecosystems using polytomus logistic regression.  A paper describing this modeling procedure was submitted to the National GAP Program for publication in the 2005 GAP Bulletin.      

Papers and posters presented in 2004:

Kleiner, K.J., M.D. MacKenzie, and A. McKerrow. 2004.  Mapping riparian wetlands from Landsat ETM+ imagery and DEM derivatives: a comparison of methods. Southeastern Biology Bulletin 51(2): 186

Hogland, J.S., M.D. MacKenzie. 2004. Using remote sensing techniques to delineate the current distribution of longleaf (Pinus palustris) ecosystems across Alabama, west Georgia, and east Mississippi. Southeastern Biology Bulletin 51(2): 186

Hogland, J. S. and M. D. MacKenzie.  2004.  Determining the current distributions of critically endangered longleaf ecosystems: A regional approach using remote sensing techniques.  Poster presented at the Integrated Regional Studies for Global Sustainability Conference, Auburn, AL 22 March 2004

Hogland, J.S., M.D. MacKenzie. 2004. Identifying Longleaf Ecosystems Using Remote
Sensing and GIS: Management Implications. Longleaf Alliance Report No. 8: in progress

Hogland, J.S., M.D. MacKenzie. 2004. Determining the current distributions of critically endangered longleaf ecosystems: A regional approach using remote sensing techniques. Poster presented at the 5th Longleaf Alliance Regional Conference, Hattiesburg, MS 12-15 October 2004

Silvano, A. L., K. J. Kleiner, B. Taylor, E. R. Irwin, M. D. MacKenzie, M. S. Mitchell, J. B. Grand.  2004.  Alabama gap analysis project: Managing biological diversity with geographic information systems.  Poster presented at the Integrated Regional Studies for Global Sustainability Conference, Auburn, AL 22 March 2004

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