"Guh, Guh, Guh"

Emergent Literacy

 Ashley Ramsey

Rationale:  Letter Recognition is a main factor that predicts a child's readiness to read. It is absolutely necessary that a child be able to recognize letters and the phonemes that go along with them. After completing this lesson, students will be able to recognize the grapheme G and be able to produce the phoneme /g/. 

Materials:

Primary paper and pencils for each student crayons

 Poster board with tongue twister "Gary the green guppy got gallons of grapes"

 Worksheet with /g/ sound words that contrast with other sound words

Giggle, Giggle, Quack

Color page with picture making the /g/ sound.

Procedures:

1.Introduce the lesson by explaining that every letter in our alphabet makes a different sound that we make with our mouth. 

Teacher says to class: So that we can be good readers and writers, we must learn all of the letters in the alphabet and their sounds. Today we are going to learn the letter G and the sound it makes.  To make the / g / sound, open your mouth with your tongue at the back.  Everyone listen to the sound I make very closely and then we will try it together (Teacher models /g/ sound).  Now let's all try it together.  

2. Teacher says to class:  I am going to pretend like I am drinking a big glass of milk. Today I am feeling extra thirsty so I am going to drink it real fast.  This is how I will drink my glass of milk (Teacher models pretending to drink out of a glass and make the / g / sound).  Now let's all pretend like we are drinking a glass of milk and make the /g/ sound.

3. Teacher says to class:  Now we are going to learn a tongue twister (Teacher will show the tongue twister "Gary the green guppy got gallons of grapes" written on the poster board). Now after I say the tongue twister you repeat it after me (Ask students to repeat the twister multiple times).  Now that we are so good at making the /g/ sound, let's make it even more fun!  This time when we make the /g/ sound we are going to pretend we a drinking our glass of milk.  Are you ready?  Let's try it together (Teacher models gesture for students and says the twister with the students twice through).   

4. Teacher says to class:  I'm so proud of you making the /g/ sound so well!  Let's take out our primary paper and pencils to practice writing the letter G.  (Teacher models writing upper case G and lower case g on the board). Get your pencils ready!  First let's make an upper case G.  We are going to make an upper case C and give it a plate of cookies he must hold straight!  Now let's make lower cane g.  Make a lower case a and give it a tail.  Great job!  Now let's write upper and lower case G on our paper five times each.

5. Teacher says to class:  Now we are going to play a game!  I am going to give you two words.  I want you to tell me if you hear the / g / sound AT THE BEGINNING of the first word or the second word.  Do you hear the / g / sound in Green or Screen?  Plate or Great?  Throw or Glow?  Great job everyone!

6. Teacher says to class:  Now we are going to play a game!  I am going to give you two words.  I want you to tell me if you hear the / g / sound AT THE END of the first word or the second word.  Do you hear the / g / sound in Flag or Top?  Pot or Frog?  Boy or Tag?  You are doing a wonderful job!

7. The teacher will now give a book talk on "Giggle, Giggle, Quack". 

Teacher says to class:  Farmer Brown is going to leave his farm to go on a vacation.  His brother Bob takes care of the farm while he is away.  The animals love to play tricks and decide to trick Bob into getting things they want.  Do you think Bob will fall for the animal's tricks?  What will happen when Farmer Brown gets back to the farm?  We will have to read the book to find out!  I will now read "Giggle, Giggle, Quack" and every time you hear the / g / sound I want you to do our gesture we learned.   

8. For assessment I will pass out a worksheet with different "G" words and their pictures as well as "non G" words and their pictures.  The students will circle the pictures that have the /g/ sound in them and X the pictures that do not.  Students will turn in work for teacher to assess.  After each student turns in their worksheet, I will give them a color page titled "G says GUH" with a picture of a man guzzling milk that they will color and keep in their folder.

References:

Cronin, D. (2002).  Giggle, Giggle, Quack.  New York, New York: Scholastic.

Cole, Emily.  "G…G…Guzzle"

http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/odysseys/coleel.html

 Barton, Kimberly.  "Gulp, Gulp, Gulp

http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/odysseys/bartonel.html

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