Sum it Up!


Reading to Learn

Ashley Forster

Rationale:

When children are able to construct meaning of a certain text and connect that text with their own background knowledge and experiences, they are showing the comprehension of what they are reading. It is important that early in a child reading education, that they learn to comprehend the story or text that they are reading. There are various ways to help students with comprehension, one is specific is summarization. Teachers use summarization because it lets her know if the students grasped the main idea behind the story.  When provided with the necessary skills to make their own summarizations they will be able to interpret the information from their readings. The following lesson the students will learn how to use summarization skills and be able to apply them to their reading skills.

Materials:

Bookmark for each student with the 3 summarization rules:

1.Delete information that is not important or repeated

2.Highlight the important and necessary details by using key words or headings

3.Find a topic sentence that covers the main idea, and if there is not a topic sentence then make one;

Highlighters for each student

Pencils for each student

A check list of each child for me to assess during reading (see assessment).

The article from national geographic ‰¥þWild Cats‰¥ÿ for each child

Procedures:

1.  Explaining comprehension: Today class we are going to be talking about comprehension does anyone know something about comprehension in reading? That's right; comprehension is when we remember what we read and after we have read it.  I know of a special technique that we could use to help us comprehend our stories, it is called summarization! If we summarize what we read, it makes it easier to remember important parts.

2. Going over the three steps for summarization: There are three steps in summarization (I will have them written n the board) step 1. Delete information that is not important or repeated so while we read we will cross out what are not important 2. Highlight the important and necessary details by using key words or headings we can use our highlighters for this part 3. Find a topic sentence that covers the main idea, and if there is not a topic sentence then make one, and if we look back at what we have highlighted these key topics will help. I also have these great bookmarks that everyone gets, so when you are reading you can look at the book mark for help.

3. Model summarizing using this excerpt from National Geographic Kids.  Now we are going to practice using summarization by reading this article about wild cats. As we read I want you to read silently like this (I model for them how to read silently, by allowing my eyes to move across the words, and occasionally mouthing the words to myself with out making any sounds). Now when I begin to pass these out I want you to begin reading the first paragraph silently. When you are finished I want you to look up. (Allow them time to read). When everyone finishes I will go over the three steps.

What comes to mind when you hear the words wild cats? Do you picture golden lions on the plains of Africa? Or tigers slinking through jungles in Asia? Maybe you should start thinking closer to home possibly even your own front yard.

Here are a few examples. A man in Pennsylvania recently watched a bobcat creep across his driveway. A hiker in Colorado felt something watching her. She turned around and found herself staring into the eyes of a mountain lion.

Stories like these are becoming more common. That's because people are moving into areas that once were wilderness. This has brought people into contact with North America's most common wild cats: mountain lions, bobcats, and lynx.

Okay here are something's I thought about that paragraph. (I will place the article on the overhead and begin to read it allowed). The first two sentences where actually questions so I marked through those. The next sentence I highlighted I thought it was important. The middle sentences I read but marked through, and I highlighted the very last sentence. So I thought 'Maybe you should start thinking closer to home possibly even your own front yard. That's because people are moving into areas that once were wilderness. This has brought people into contact with North America's most common wild cats: mountain lions, bobcats, and lynx.' was important, and is a summarization of what that paragraph was about.

4. Guided practice: now I will have you all read together in groups and work together to figure out the summarization of the next section of the article. (Have them sitting together in groups of three to four.) Remember to use the highlighters and pencils to highlight important facts and to cross out repeats or unimportant things. (Allow for them to read). Remember to write down one or two summarization sentence! Begin reading, when you are finished everyone look up at me.

5.  Now I am going to have you all try this all on your own! While you are reading I want you to use the highlighter that I have provided and a pencil to cross out things that are not important or might be repeated, and to highlight the important parts. I want you too read the rest of the article and write down one or two sentences explaining what the article was about. Remember to read quietly, and just read the last section. When you are finished, look up. 

Assessment:

I will assess my students on their summarization of the article. I will read what hey have written, to see if they comprehended their text. I will have a check list for each student, so when I am looking over their summaries I can take note if they have 1.included the main points 2.deleted any small details and 3.combined repeated ideas. Also I will note if they crossed out or highlighted and important or unimportant information in their articles. I will also take note of the students who are using their bookmarks for reference.

 

Resources:

Wild Cats Article by Dana Jensen and Peter Winkler. "Wild Cats" appears on page 18 of the March 2008 issue.

http://magma.nationalgeographic.com/ngexplorer/0803/articles/mainarticle.html

Autrey, Sarah. "Let's Get the Facts!"

http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/constr/autreyrl.html

Foster, Ridey. "Sensational Summarization" http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/constr/fosterrl.html

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