GET TO THE POINT!


 

Reading to Learn Lesson Plan
Tammy Bauer

Rationale:  The main goal of reading is comprehension.  Students work hard at reading but they must also learn how to comprehend and summarize the passages they have read.  Students may use the summarization strategy to better comprehend what they have read.  They need to learn to remember the high points of the text that they are reading.  One method of comprehension is for students to summarize a passage into one topic sentence.  This lesson will help children learn how to summarize.  They will learn how to pick out important information from the text that they are reading by using the summarization techniques.

Material:

1.  Copies of article, “Facts about Bottlenose Dolphins” by Marion McGrath for each student and teacher

(found at http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/Animals/CreatureFeature/Bottlenose-dolphin)

2.  Poster with summarization rules on it:

 

Get rid of unimportant information

Get rid of the repeated information.

Super-ordinate items and events under one umbrella term.

Select a topic.

Write a topic sentence that covers everything that is important from the passage of text.

 

3.  Poster with paragraph on it from “Gorilla Rescue”  (found at http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/Stories/AnimalsNature/Gorillarescue)

 

“The poachers—illegal hunters—had finally found a buyer for their stolen goods. A meeting was arranged, and when the buyer asked to see the merchandise, they brought out a small duffel bag and unzipped it. Inside was a terrified one-year-old baby gorilla."

 

Paper

Pencils

black marker for each student

highlighter for each student

Summarization Checklist:

 

Did the Student….

Yes

No

Get rid of unimportant information

 

 

Get rid of repeated information

 

 

Super-ordinate items and events

 

 

Select a topic

 

 

 

Write a topic sentence that covers everything that is important from the passage

 

 

 

Procedures:

 

1.  Introduce the lesson explaining that we are going to learn a new comprehension strategy.  “Today, we are going to learn a new comprehension strategy that is called summarization.  It will help us understand the text that we are reading better.  Can any explain to me what the term summarization means?  Good job!  Summarization means to take the main or the most important ideas out of a passage.  When you summarize a passage, you understand and comprehend what you have read better.”

 

2.  Review the fluency strategies with all of the students.  "What do you do when you have trouble reading a work in a sentence?  Very good, you remembered.  We can crosscheck what we have read to make sure that the sentence makes sense.  Say I read this sentence (write the sentence on the board, "The cat played and played.") as "The cat payed and payed" then I could use the crosschecking strategy skills to determine that a cat doesn't payed so the sentence does not make sense. I would reread the sentence correctly as "The cat played and played."

 

3.  Display on the board the poster with the summarization rules written on it.  "We can use these summarizations rules written on this poster to help us comprehend and understand what we read."  Read the rules out loud to the students.    Display the poster with the paragraph from the "Gorilla Rescue" article written on it.  "I want you to read the paragraph on this poster from the article "Gorilla Rescue" silently to yourselves.   I will give you about 10 minutes to read this article and then I will model how to use the summarization rules written on the poster board."

 

4.   "Let's look at the paragraph from 'Gorilla Rescue' that is on the poster board.  It states:  "The poachers—illegal hunters—had finally found a buyer for their stolen goods. A meeting was arranged, and when the buyer asked to see the merchandise, they brought out a small duffel bag and unzipped it. Inside was a terrified one-year-old baby gorilla."  "The first rule states that we need to get rid of the unimportant information.  I am going to cross out with my black marker – '—illegal hunters—'.  Next, I am going to cross out '…when the buyers asked to see the merchandise….and unzipped it.  I need to remember that the poachers had finally bound a buyer for their stolen goods and a meeting was arranged and they brought out a small duffel bag and inside was a terrified one-year-old baby gorilla.  The second rule is to get rid of the repeated information.  There is no repeated information in this passage.  We can now go to rule number three which is to super-ordinate items and events under one umbrella term.  I am going to highlight – 'The poachers had finally found a buyer for their stolen goods, ' and 'A meeting was arranged and they brought out a small duffel bag and inside was a terrified one-year-old baby gorilla.'   These are the most important ideas in this passage.  The umbrella term for this passage is the selling of a one-year-old baby gorilla.  The next step is to decide on the topic of the passage, which is the baby gorilla.  The last step is to compile a topic sentence.  My topic statement is as follows: 'The poachers had found a buyer for their stolen goods, arranged a meeting and showed them a terrified one-year-old baby gorilla.'  This is how you apply the summarization rules that are displayed on the board."

 

5.  Pass out the article "Facts About Bottlenose Dolphins" to each student.  "I have given each of you a copy of the article "Facts About Bottlenose Dolphins".  I want each of you to read it silently and then apply the summarization rules to summarize this passage."  Provide an article talk:  "Have you ever seen a dolphin swim in the ocean?  They make different types of sounds that sound as if they are making music.  Let's read the rest of the article to find out more interesting facts about these dolphins.  Remember to use your makers to cross out the unimportant information and your highlighter to highlight the important information that you want to summarize.  After you have done this combine the important information into one topic sentence.  After everyone has completed their summarizations, we will all share them with the rest of the class."

 

6.  For assessment use the checklist in the materials section to evaluate each of their summarizations.  Each child will be evaluated on their ability to delete the trivial and repeated information, find the important information, and create a one topic and summarizing sentence.   I will also ask questions pertaining to the text to the class to make sure that they comprehended and understood what they had read. 

 

References:

 

National Geographic for Kids (2008).  Facts About Bottlenose Dolphins. 

http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/Animals/CreatureFeature/Bottlenose-dolphin

 

National Geographic For Kids (2008).  Gorilla Rescue.

http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/Stories/AnimalsNature/Gorillarescue

 

Cadrette, Mallory.  What's the Point.

http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/encounters/cadretterl.html

 

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