Buzz with Bees using Z's

 

 

 

Emergent Literacy Design

Rachel Greer

Rationale:

This lesson will help children identify /z/, the phoneme represented by Z.  Students will learn to recognize /z/ in spoken words by learning a meaningful representation (buzzing like a bee) and the letter symbol Z, practice finding /z/ in words, and apply phoneme awareness with /z/ in phonetic cue reading by distinguishing rhyming words from beginning letters.

 

Materials:

--picture of bumblebee and /z/

--poster or paper with tongue twister "Zigmund Zane zig-zagged through the zany zoo zone"

--primary paper (enough for each student)

--pencils (enough for each student)

--individual flashcards with pictures of: zebra, zipper, maze, wizard, zoo

--individual flashcards with words in all capital letters: ZAG, ZERO, BOOM, NED, ZANY

--worksheet containing pictures containing /z/ and one without (enough for each student)

 

Procedure:

1. Say, "Today we are going to learn about the letter 'z' and the sound it makes, /z/.  To me, /z/ sounds a bit like the sound a bumblebee makes /z/z/z/z/ when it is buzzing (pantomime a buzzing bumblebee). When we say /z/, the tip of our tongues touch above the tops of our teeth.  From now on, every time we hear /z/ or see a z, we will be bumblebees."

 

2. Say, "I'm going to show you how to find /z/ in some different words. Listen while I stretch out the word crazy. C-r-a-z-y. Slower: cc-rr-aa-zz-yy.  Did everyone hear the bumblebee buzz in crazy? It was towards the end.  What about in the word buzz? B-u-zz. Slower: bb-uu-zz.  Way to go! It was at the very end."

 

3. Say: "Now let us try a tongue twister: (display on paper or poster) Zigmund Zane zig-zagged through the zany zoo zone.  Let's practice saying that together while we buzz like bumblebees when we hear /z/. (say it once).  Now let's say again, this time stretching the z's at the beginning of each word. Zzz-igmund Zzz-ane zzz-ig-zzz-agged through the zzz-any zzz-oo zzz-one.  This time, let's say it with a pause between each /z/ sound and the rest of the word. /z/  igmund /z/  ane /z/  ig-/z/  agged through the /z/  any /z/  oo /z/  one."

 

4. Say: ''Let's practice writing the letter Z to spell /z/.  (Give every student primary paper and a pencil).  Capital Z and lowercase z look the same, but capital Z is just a little bigger than lowercase z.  Let's write the capital Z first.  Start on the rooftop and make a short straight line.  Next, draw a line through the fence to the sidewalk like you are going to make the number 7.  Now, keep your pencil down and draw a short straight line on sidewalk.  I want to see everyone's capital Z's.  Then, you can make ten more. Now, let's practice the lowercase z.  Start on the fence this time, and make a small straight line.  Draw a line to the sidewalk like you are going to make a 7.  From the end of the 7, draw a straight line on the sidewalk.  Now you've made a lowercase z!  Practice those on your paper and I will come around and check them.''

 

5. Say: ''In the next activity, I am going to show you some pictures.  The things in the pictures contain Z's that make the sound /z/.  I want you to show me how you can make the /z/ sound when you say the word.  I'll do one first to show you.  (Show picture of a zebra.) This is a zzzzz-ebra.  Now it's your turn.''  (Show students pictures of a zipper, a maze, a wizard, and a zoo, and have them say the appropriate name for each picture with emphasis on the letter Z).

 

6. Say: "Each of you are doing an excellent job of hearing the sound /z/, so I am going to say a few words and you can tell me which ones contain the bumblebee buzz: do you hear /z/ in zap or map? Zip or lip? Zone or phone?"

 

7. Say: "I am going to say a sentence and I want to see your bumblebees each time I say/z/. Zachary's zebra Zoe has zero fuzzy zippers."

 

8. Say: ''Now, I am going to show you some flashcards with a word on it, like this one.  (Show ZAG.)  I will give you two words and say, 'Is this word zag or rag?'  (Model I will decide whether the word is zag or rag.)  The Z tells me to buzz like a bumblebee, /z/.  So, this word has to be zzzzz-ag. Zag.  It's your turn to try: ZERO: Is this hero or zero?  BOOM: zoom or boom?  NED: ned or zed?  ZANY: brainy or zany?"

 

Assessment:

As an individual assessment, provide a worksheet with pictures of both words containing the /z/ sound and others that do not.  Have students color the pictures that do contain the /z/ sound and 'x' out the pictures that do not.  Take up papers to see who did and did not comprehend the lesson.

 

Reference:

Murray, Bruce. (2008). Brush Your Teeth with F.

http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/sightings/murrayel.html

 

Terry, Meg. (2009). Zipping Up Z!

http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/projects/terryel.html

 

The Teachers' Desk. (1997).

http://www.teachersdesk.org/vocabtong.html

 

 

 

 

 

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