Close Your Eyes and Visualize


Reading to Learn

By: Heather Smith

Rationale: Being able to visualize while reading will help students with their comprehension skills. Visualization is an important factor in comprehension. It is easy to visualize when books have illustrations, but getting children to learn to visualize early on with non-illustrated text will help them develop a meaningful connection with the text they read.

Materials: (enough for each student)

Copy paper

Pencils

Crayons

Book: The Tale of Despereaux. By: Kate Dicamillo

Poem:  Dreaming of Summer.  By: Kenn Nesbitt-  http//www.poetry4kids.com/poem-172.html

  Assessment checklist sheet:

           Did the student read silently?

Ÿ                  Did the student draw a picture?

Ÿ                  Were the drawings accurate for poem?

Ÿ                  Were the drawings accurate for assigned reading(s)?

Ÿ                   Were the drawings detailed?

 

Procedures:

1). Be sure to pass out plenty of paper, pencils, and crayons to each student. They will use these throughout the lesson. “Today we are going to learn how to visualize while we read.” “I am going to say a word and I want you to write down the first thing that comes to your mind on your sheet of paper”. “It may help you to close your eyes.” Say the word, “Florida”. Allow time for the students all to write something down and then let them share what they have written. “When I said the word, you created a mental image in your mind and that mental image can help with understanding what we read while reading.”

2). Now I am going to read the poem called Dreaming of Summer by Kenn Nesbitt and I want you to visualize in your mind what is happening. You can think about what the characters look like or what just happened or what might happen next. If it helps for you to draw pictures while the poem is being read you may do so. After the poem is read put the students into groups and have them share their visualizations.

3). We are going to get back to our seats now and begin reading in a book called The Tale of Despereaux by Kate Dicamillo. I will read the first chapter aloud while we engage in visualizing. After I have read the first chapter, I want to draw a picture of anything that I visualized during the chapter. Allow time for all students to draw their pictures and then model yours. Show your picture and explain it, then let the students show theirs.

4). “Can anyone tell me what silent reading is?” It is where you read quietly to yourself and no one should be able to hear you voice. I would like for you to read the second chapter silently and then stop. I want you to visualize while you read and then afterwards draw a picture(s) of what you visualized like we just did with chapter one. We will share our pictures after everyone has drawn something.

5). Use the following checklist to assess each student’s visualization and comprehension:

Assessment Checklist:

           Did the student read silently?

Ÿ                  Did the student draw a picture?

Ÿ                  Were the drawings accurate for poem?

Ÿ                  Were the drawings accurate for assigned reading(s)?

Ÿ                  Were the drawings detailed?

References:

The Reading Genie Website: How to See With Your Eyes Closed. By: Mareena Kohtala.

http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/connect/kohtalarl.html

Poem: Dreaming of Summer by: Ken Nesbitt

http//www.poetry4kids.com/poem-172.html

Dicamillo, Kate. The Tale of Despereaux. Candlewick Press. Cambridge, MA. 2003.

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