The Hungry Half-brother of Harry the Hippo


 Keylon Callaway



Rationale:

In this lesson, students will learn how to recognize h in spoken language. They will learn a letter symbol, a picture, a sound, and a gesture to go along with the lesson. They will also learn how their mouth moves while making the sound h. All of these things will help them remember and learn the h. It is just as important to learn one phoneme as it is the next, but this lesson will focus on getting our students to understand h.

Materials:

primary paper, pencil, popsicle sticks, picture of items laying around or in a bag, but have a worksheet with pictures of a hat, ham, house, ball, stick, bike, hair, horse, picture of a man breathing on glasses to clean them, site words starting with h, with the  word on the other side; The Hungry Hippo; Poster drawn with the phrase "The Hungry Hippo's, Harry, and his half-brother, Henry hurried back to Harry's House because Henry was Hungry" There should be a drawing of the two running back to the house to make the poster more appealing to the children. Horton Hatches the Egg by Dr seuss, and The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle.

Procedure:

Explain that all have their own mouth movements when spoken, which is a phoneme. Today we are going to learn that the letter h makes the /h/ sound. First ask them if they ever seen their parent/guardian breathe on their glasses before cleaning them off. Did you hear the /h/ sound? I want everybody to tell me what Santa Clause says when he comes to town,"ho,ho,ho,"/ What kind of mouth movement did you make? I felt my jaw move down. Now everyone take out a piece of paper, and hold it up in front of your mouth and simply breather. Did the paper move? Just a little right, that all it takes to produce the h sound.

I am now going to read the phrase that I cam u with to help you guys learn h. Let's all pay close attention while I read aloud. "The Hungry Hippo's..Harry, and his half-brother, Henry, hurried back to Harry's House because Henry was Hungry." Did you hear the /h/ sound in any of those words? Now let's all try saying this tongue twisting phrase together and listen for the /h/ sound. Good Job Boys and Girls.

Now split the class up in two. One side will say The Hungry Hippo, and his half-brother, hurried back. The other side will say Harry, Henry, to Harry's House. Then they will all shout HENRY WAS HUNGRY!. The object of this activity is to get all the children involved with expression and the use of the h=h phoneme. This will be fun. All the children to stand up, group themselves, and shout.

Now we are going to try and write the letter h. everyone take out your primary writing paper. Watch as I show you how to write the letter h. Now take out you pencil. We are going to start at the very top of the street and draw a line straight down to the bottom of the hill. Then we are going to start half-way up the hill and simply curve out and down back to the bottom of the hill. We are not connecting at the bottom of the hill that would make what letter? Small b. Now you all may try and write the letter h. I will come around to help you if needed, just raise your hand. I would like for you to write two rows of the letter h. Then repeat out loud Santa Clause says "ho, ho, ho".

Now I am going to show you some sight words, hat, ham, stick, bike, etc. I want you to raise your hand when you hear the h sound. For example; hat, what sound did you hear? H, right. Now I will show you some pictures, after you figure out what is on the picture and the word, I want you to raise our hand if the h sound is in that word. Now I am going to read Horton Hatches the Egg by Dr Seuss, and the Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle. Do you hear an h sound in the title. Now I am passing out Popsicle sticks, I want you to raise your stick every time you hear the h sound. Assessment: To assess the children, I will ask them to place and x over each item of the picture of items that does not have the h sound starting the word. I will remind them that the word must begin with the h and have the h sound.

References:

www.auburn.edu/rdggenie

 

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http://www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/sightings.html.