Slithering Snakes Say "SSSsssss"

 

snake

Emergent Literacy

Haley Hollis

 

Rationale: In this lesson, children will learn to identify the phoneme /s/ by learning a meaningful representation (slithering like a snake) and the letter symbol S, recognizing /s/ in spoken words, repeating an /s/ filled tongue tickler, writing lowercase and uppercase S’s, and applying phoneme awareness with /s/ in phonetic cue reading by distinguishing rhyming words from beginning letters.

 

Materials:

-Tongue tickler written on chart paper: "Sam's sister Sally wore sassy socks."

-Primary paper

-Pencils

-Pipe Cleaner

-Googly eyes

-Clipboards

-Primary chart paper

- Picture of Slithering Snake S

- "What Begins with S" worksheet

 

Procedures:

 

1. Say: "Today we are going to learn about the letter 's' and the sound it makes, /s/.  To me, /s/ sounds a bit like the sound a snake makes as it is slithering along. To remember that the letter s sounds like a slithering snake, let’s pretend that our arms are snakes. Put your hands together and wiggle your arms while making a "Sssssss sound like snakes make…/s/ /s/ /s/ /s/. Let’s pay attention to how our mouths move when we make that sound. When we say /s/, our teeth are together and we’re blowing air through our teeth."

 

2. Say: "Let me show you how you can find /s/ in the word sunny. I am going to stretch out the word by saying it in very slowly and I want you to watch what I’m doing and listen for the sound a snake makes. Sss-uu-nnn-yy. Ok, now we will try it a little slower Ss-uuu-nnnn-yyy. I heard it! Did you hear it?"

 

3. Say: "Ok everyone let's all try a tongue tickler (on chart).  'Sam's shop stocks short spotted socks.’ Great! Now let's say it three times in a row. Excellent! Now let's try stretching out the /s/ at the beginning of the words. ‘ SSSSam's sssister SSSally wore sssassy sssocks.' Try it again and break the /s/ off of the word: "/S/-am’s/ s/-ister S-/ally wore s/assy  s/-ocks.'

 

4.  Have all the students take out primary paper and a pencil.  Say: "We will use the letter S to spell /s/ and the letter S looks like a snake. Let's write uppercase S. For uppercase S, first form a c up in the air between the rooftop and the fence, then swing back (demonstrate on primary chart paper). Can everyone show me their uppercase S?  Great job everyone! I’m going to walk around and look at everyone’s S. If I put a sticker on your paper please practice writing ten more just like the first one. Now we’re going to write lowercase s. For lowercase s, form a tiny c up in the air between the fence and the ditch and then swing back (demonstrate on primary chart paper). Can everyone show me their lowercase s? Great job! I’m going to walk around and look at everyone’s S. If I put a sticker on your paper please practice writing ten more just like the first one."

 

5. Say:  "Now we are going to make our own slithering snake. I am going to hand you each a pipe cleaner and I want you to form an S with it. When you are finished I will pass out the glue and googly eyes for you to glue on your S.  Once you are finished, you will have a slithering S snake."

 

6. Say: "I am going to read a sentence and I want to see your letters each time I say /s/.

"Sarah and Sue sat on the seesaw singing silly songs."

 

7. Say: "I will now read a couple words together to see if you can tell which word contains the letter s. If you hear /s/ I want you to raise your slithering S snake in the air. Do you hear /s/ in third or second?  Happy or sad?  Skip or run? Winter or summer?"

 

8. Show SINK and model for students how to decide if the word is pink or sink.  Say: "The S tells me to slither like a snake so this word is Ssss -ink. Now you try: SORE- is this sore or more? SAP- is this map or sap?  SUM- is this sum or bum? SET- is this word set or met?"

 

Assessment: I will pass out a worksheet. The students will practice printing the letter S and decide which pictures begin with S. Also, I will call students forward to individually read the words from number 8 above.

 

References:

 

Worksheet: http://www.tlsbooks.com/beginningsoundofletters.pdf

 

Helpful Lessons:

 Schupp, Elise. Emergent Literacy Design. "Flapping Flag F". http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/solutions/schuppel.htm

Adkins, Kerry. Emergent Literacy Design.  "Popping Popcorn With P".      http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/journeys/adkinsel.htm

 

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