Racing to Read with Fluency!

Sarah Walton

Growing Independence and Fluency


 

Rationale: Children must become fluent readers in order to reach the highest goal of comprehension and become good readers. Fluent readers are able to read effortlessly and quickly, allowing them to comprehend what is being read. A fluent reader is also someone who reads the text smoothly and with expression. The goal for this lesson is to improve fluency and teach students to speed up their reading. Students will be given time to read and reread decodable text to one another and do timed partner readings in order to improve fluency.

 
Materials:

1.      Timer/Stopwatch for each pair of students

2.      A copy of the book Kite Day at Pine Lake (Written by Sheila Cushman. Illustrated by Patti Briles. Published by Educational Insights, 1990) for each pair of students

3.      A dry erase board

4.      Dry erase marker (to write i_e=/I/ correspondence words and the sentence "my dog like to go on walks.")

5.      Pencil for each student

6.      Assessment sheet: Fluency Checklist (one for each student)

 

Name of Reader:                                

Name of Partner:                                

                                Words read 1st time (in 1 minute):                        

                                Words read 2nd time: (in 1 minute)                       

                                Words read 3rd time: (in 1 minute)                        

Did my partner:

                                                Circle one

                                -Read smoothly?           Yes           No

                                -Read Faster?                Yes           No

                                -Comprehend?               Yes          No

 

Procedure:

1.     1.  Begin the lesson by reviewing the i_e=/I/ correspondence. Teacher will give the word kite as an example, and will write it on the dry erase board. Teacher will then ask students to display their knowledge with i_e correspondence by naming words with that correspondence. Teacher will write words on the board as the students say different words with the i_e correspondence. 

2.    2.  Next, do a book talk for Kite Day at Pine Lake. "Have you ever flown a kite? The kids in this story are all flying their kites at the lake and having so much fun. One little boy named Bob does not have a kite to fly, and gets very sad when he sees everyone else flying their kite. What do you think Bob will do? You will have to keep reading to see if Bob will ever get to fly a kite and see what happens!"

3.     3. Today we are going to practice reading with fluency. This means we are going to practice reading quickly, smoothly, and with expression. When we read quickly, we are able to comprehend/understand what the story is about much easier rather than reading slowly. The teacher will then write the sentence my dog likes to go on walks on the dry erase board. She will then show how a non-fluent reader would read the sentence. (reading very slowly without fluency and with pauses in between words, and sounding out each word) "My dooooog (pause) lliiiiikes (pause) to gggooo ooonn (pause) waallkks. This is how a non-fluent reader would read. It makes it more difficult to remember what you read if you read it slowly and choppy with pauses."

4.    4.  Teacher will now read the same sentence, but this time modeling how a fluent reader would read it. "My dog likes to go on walks. Do you see how smoothly I read that sentence and how much I improved compared to the first time I read it? I was being a fluent reader because I read smoothly and with expression! I figured out the tricky words and crosschecked to make sure it made sense in the sentence. It is very important that we crosscheck because if the sentence does not make sense we need to go back and crosscheck to make sure it does!" Ask students to tell the difference between the two ways that you read the same sentence. (First way was choppy, slow, and with pauses.—not read with fluency. Second way was smooth, quick, and with expression—read with fluency.) After reading the sentence with and without expression, I will explain and emphasize how important it is that we read with fluency so that we can comprehend and enjoy what we read.

5.     5.  Divide the students into groups of two. Give each student a copy of Kite Day at Pine Lake and a timer/stopwatch (1 per group), and a fluency checklist that they can use to record how many words they read in a minute three different times. This will show whether or not they progress each time with fluency. Give directions. "First read the book to yourself silently to become familiar with the text. After you and your partner are both done reading it to yourself, one person read aloud, while your partner uses the stopwatch. We are going to see how much you can read in one minute to practice fluency! When you are the one not reading out loud, you will follow along and listen to see if your partner is reading smoothly, quicker each time, and with expression. After all three times that you read, you will record the number of words you read next to the first, second, and third column on your fluency checklist. If you need any help or have any questions, please raise your hand and I will be happy to come help!"

Assessment: Have students write their names on the fluency checklist to turn in. In order to measure each student's success in reading with fluency, call each child up to your desk individually. "I know that each of you have practiced reading with expression and fluently with your partner, so I know you will all do a great job!" Take notes of how the child reads (smoothly or choppy, quickly or slowly, boring or with expression) Also take note of how many words the child reads correctly and incorrectly. Compare how they read to you compared to their fluency checklist to see what steps you need to take with them, and to assess their progress. Also, look at their fluency checklist to compare the number of words the child read per minute the first time, and then the number of words they read per minute the last time they read to see if it increased.

Fluency Checklist Assessment: (that each student will turn in and you will look at)

Name of Reader:                                

Name of Partner:                                

                                Words read 1st time (in 1 minute):                        

                                Words read 2nd time: (in 1 minute)                       

                                Words read 3rd time: (in 1 minute)                        

Did my partner:

                                                Circle one

                                -Read smoothly?           Yes           No

                                -Read Faster?                Yes           No

                                -Comprehend?               Yes          No

 

 References:

Kite Day at Pine Lake by Sheila Cushman. Illustrated by Patti Briles. Published by Educational Insights, 1990

 Auburn University Reading Genie Web site, Growing Independence and Fluency Design,

Morgan Montgomery. "Take the Fluency Test With Henry and Mudge!" http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/sightings/montgomerygf.html

 Danielle Ivey. "It's a Good Day to Start Reading Fluently" http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/sightings/iveygf.html

 Fluency Checklist Assessment Sheet: http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/sightings/montgomerygf.html

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