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Reading Right!

Hanna Taylor

Growing Fluency

boy readingboy reading 2girl reading 2girl reading


 

Rationale.  Fluency is the goal for reading programs because it allows students to read with ease, making it easier for them to comprehend, expand their vocabulary, and enjoy the text.  This lesson will provide the students with a procedure for learning to be fluent readers (which includes crosschecking, rereading, using context clues, decoding, and finishing the sentence after figuring out a tricky word), will model the stages of becoming fluent, and will express the positive effects of a fluent reading session.

 



Materials

1) If You Give a Mouse a Cookie text- Numeroff, Laura Joffe. If You Give a Mouse a Cookie. Illustrated by Felicia Bond. Harper Collins; New York, 1985.

 

2) Frog and Toad are Friends text- Lobel, Arnold. Frog and Toad are Friends. Harper Collins; New York, 1979.

 

3) Students' texts of choice for AR reading

 

4) Check sheets for partner reading: Murray, Bruce. Reading Genie: Checksheets for Partner Reading. http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/

fluency.html.

5) Access to AR online quiz for assessment- http://www.renlearn.com/ar/

 



Procedures

Today we're going to discuss fluent reading. Fluent reading means that you read effortlessly with very few mistakes. It is important that you learn to be fluent readers because this helps you to understand what you are reading and makes reading a lot more fun!

One step we have to remember in order to be fluent readers is how to help ourselves when reading. What have we already learned about how to figure out words that we don't know? (We will discuss the self-help strategies for review)

          Finish the sentence

Crosschecking

          Reread the sentence

          Context clues

Decoding

Now that we know how to help ourselves when we get stuck, let's talk about how to recognize when our fluency is increasing. I brought the book "If you Give a Mouse a Cookie," and I'm going to read it as if I had never seen it before. Booktalk: "Do you know what happens if you give a mouse a cookie? He just keeps wanting more! When will he ever stop? Let's read to find out. I will model reading with the first page with difficulty: slowly, stumbling over words; missing a couple of words; crosschecking and re-reading the sentence; no expression- "If. . . you. . . g. . . give. . . a . . . mou. . . moss. . .a. . . cookie. Oh, Mouse!" etc.)

          Could you understand what this story was about?

          Were you interested in the story?

Because I had some difficulty reading the passage for the first time, I was not able to remember much about what I read. It is very important that we remember what we read!

Now that I've seen the passage before, I'm going to try to read it again. Listen to how I become more fluent the second time through. (Model reading the same page; correct the words that I missed; still no expression)

This time I was able to remember the corrections I made the first time and I didn't miss the words. Were you able to understand what I read any better? Since I got the words right this time, I was able to understand what the passage was about.

Now I'm going to read the passage one more time, but this time since I'll know the words, I'm going to use expression and phrase the sentences like I would if I were speaking rather than reading.  (Model reading the same passage without missing any words; use expression; phrase as if speaking rather than reading).

Did you notice the difference between the first two times and that time? During which reading was it easier for you to understand the story? I know that when I read the story the third time I was able to read it as if I were speaking. This made it a lot easier for me to understand. Once we have had lots of practice reading, our reading becomes more fluent and this helps us to comprehend the text.

I'm going to divide you into reading partners. You and your partner will be reading the book "Frog and Toad are Friends. "This book is about a frog and a toad who are best friends! Do you have a best friend? Are there certain things you like to do with your best friend? Let's find out what frog and toad do together by reading the book." With your partner you are going to fill out a sheet of paper that will show your partner how their reading has improved after they have read a passage two and three times.

 



Assessment

As an assessment, the students will be asked to take two AR quizes online.  For the first quiz, the student will simply read a book of choice (on their reading level) one time through and take the quiz to evaluate their comprehension. For the second quiz, the student will have the opportunity to read a book of choice (on their reading level) a total of three times before taking the quiz to evaluate their comprehension. The two quiz grades will be compared to see if fluency has increased. The quiz is automatically graded according to the amount of answers the child gave correctly.

 



Reference

Harden, Adrienne. Quiet as a Christmas Mouse. Spring 2007. http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/odysseys/hardengf.html.


Numeroff, Laura Joffe. If You Give a Mouse a Cookie. Illustrated by Felicia Bond. Harper Collins; New York, 1985.

 

Lobel, Arnold. Frog and Toad are Friends. Harper Collins; New York, 1979.

 

Murray, Bruce. Reading Genie: Developing Reading Fluency. http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/fluency.html.

 

Murray, Bruce. Reading Genie: Checksheets for Partner Reading. http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/fluency.html


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