Big and Small Bouncing Balls

soccerball

Emergent Literacy

Greer Montgomery

 

Rationale:  Letter recognition is a fundamental step to becoming a good reader and writer. Therefore, it is important to learn the letters of the alphabet and the sounds that they make. This lesson will focus on teaching children the letter /b/. The ultimate goal is for students to be able to write a capital and lowercase b, to recognize the sound (b= /b/), and locate b=/b/ in spoken and written words.  

 

Materials:

Big, Small, Little Red Ball By: Emma Dodd (Templar Publishing; 2001)

Beach Ball

Bouncing Ball

Dry Erase Board

Dry Erase Marker

Tongue twister written on poster (Becca Begs for a Big Blue Ball at the Beautiful Beach)

Primary Paper

Pencil

Brown Bag

Items inside the bag: button, bread, ball, book, birthday cake, balloons, baby, banana, brush, bubble bath, band aids, pencil, pen, dog, donkey, ring, sticker, dinosaur, ping pong paddle

Crayons

Worksheet with 7 items on it (dog, banana, book, ballerina, bed, bee, penguin)

 

Procedure:

1. Introduce the lesson and explain why it is important to the children.

*Say to students: Today, we will learn about the letter b. The letter b makes the /b/ sound. So what sound does the letter b make? Excellent, the letter b makes the /b/ sound. You hear the /b/ sound in the word beach and brown. Do you know any other words that start with the /b/ sound?

2. Children will practice saying the /b/ sound and learn and meaningful gesture. 

*Say to students: When I think about the sound /b/, I think about a big ball. Get the beach ball out and have the students to stand in a big circle and say, Now, I’m going to throw this beach ball to each one of you and I want you to catch the beach ball and say the sound that letter b makes. For example, if Josh threw the beach ball to me, I would catch it and say /b/.  Throw the beach ball to each of the students and then say, that was great, now think about when you are in P.E. class and you bounce a ball in the gym. What sound does the ball make when it hits the floor? Yes, it kind of sounds like /b/, /b/, /b/. Bounce a big ball the floor and say, when the ball hits the floor, I want you all to say /b/ and I also want you to stand up and pretend that you are bouncing a ball too. Great job! Get everyone to sit down and ask How does your mouth feel when you say /b/ ,/b/, /b/? Look how my lips start out together and then they open as a puff of air comes out. Now, one last time let’s pretend to bounce our ball while we practice the /b/ sound. Let’s try to find the /b/ sound in the word rabbit. R-R-R-A-A-A-B-B-B-B-B-B…there it is! My lips start together and then puff and open and you hear the /b/ sound/ It sounds like a bouncing ball. Let's say rabbit together. When you hear the /b/ sound, bounce your ball. R-R-A-A-B-B-B-B-I-I-T-T. Great job! I saw everyone bouncing their ball after the /a/ sound!

3. Introduce a tongue twister to the students that allows them to practice the /b/ sound.

*Say to students:  I am going to say a tongue twister, everyone listen for the /b/ sound. Becca Begs for a Big Blue Ball at the Beautiful Beach. I will first demonstrate aloud how to say the tongue twister and then I will say it aloud stretching the /b/ sound, Bbbbecca Bbbbegs for a Bbbbig Bbbblue Bbbball at the Bbbbeautiful Bbbbeach. Students will then say the tongue twister off the poster board aloud with me. The students and I will say it together 3 times. Next, we will say it stressing the /b/ sound and then the students will say it using the new hand gesture (bouncing a ball) when they hear the /b/ sound.

4. The letter b can be a hard to write for some students. Have each student take out a piece of primary paper and a pencil. Using the dry erase board, demonstrate how to write a lowercase and uppercase B/b. Talk and give assistance to the students through the process.

*Say to students: I am going to show you how to write a lowercase or some people call it a small letter b. Watch me write b first and then you can practice on your own paper. (Write as you talk) Start at the roof; go down, b-bbounce back up and around. Now say it with me as you practice. Start at the roof; go down, b-bbounce back up and around. Let’s try again. Start at the roof; go down, b-bbounce back up and around. Now, practice writing your lowercase b and write the lowercase b 7 times. If you would like to you can say start at the roof, go down, b-bbounce back up and around in your head for help. Once you’re done, put your pencil down so I can come check your work.

*Say to students: I am going to show you how to write an uppercase or some people call it a big letter B. First, watch me write B and then you can practice on your own paper. (Write as you talk) Go straight down the sidewalk; around for his big chest, and around for his big tummy. Now say it with me as you practice. Go straight down the sidewalk; around for his big chest, and around for his big tummy. I want to hear everyone’s voice, let’s try it again. Go straight down the sidewalk; around for his big chest, and around for his big tummy. Now, practice writing your uppercase B 7 times. If you would like to you can say go straight down the sidewalk; around for his big chest, and around for his big tummy’ in your head to help you out.

5. Play a drawing game to help students hear the /b/ sound in words. Students will select items out of my brown bag. When the item is selected, students will name the item aloud and tell if that item begins with a /b/ sound. If the item doesn’t begin with the /b/ sound then they will tell what sound the item begins with.

* Say to students: We are going to play a game. I will call each student up to the front and they will pick an item out of my brown bag. When you draw the item out, you will name the item and tell if that item begins with a /b/ sound. For example, I selected a _________. I do hear the /b/ sound in ________. But every item in the brown bag doesn’t start with a b or the /b/ sound so, if you don’t hear the /b/ sound then you would say, I selected a _______. I don’t hear the /b/ sound in ________ but I do hear the ___sound.

6. Introduce the book, Big, Small, Little Red Ball to the students. When reading the book, the students will demonstrate our new hand gesture (bouncing ball) when they hear the /b/ sound.

*Say to students: Now we are going to read the story, Big, Small, Little Red Ball.  Woof is a dog that has a lot of friends and when Woof and his friends play, they like to play with their favorite ball. But Woof has lost his favorite ball and him and his friends can’t play until they found Woofs favorite ball. Let’s read to find out what kind of ball is Woof’s favorite and where his ball is. When I read, I want you to listen out for the /b/ sound. When you hear the /b/ sound, I want you to pretend that you are bouncing a ball.  Let’s practice with the title, B-B-B-BBig (slow motion, bouncing the ball), Small, Little, Red B-B-B-BBall (Bouncing your hand).

 

Assessment:

Distribute a worksheet with 7 pictures on it (dog, banana, book, ballerina, bed, bee, penguin). Students are to color only the pictures that have the /b/ sound. I will walk around and talk to each student with they work to determine if they have any problems with writing or identifying the letter b.

 

Reference:

Dodd, Emma. Big, Small, Little Red Ball. Templar Publishing. London. 2001.

Goodwin, Candice. Bouncing B’s. http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/passages/goodwinel.html

Murray, Bruce. Teaching Letter Recognition http://www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/letters.html

Murray, Bruce. Mouth Moves and Gestures for Phonemes. http://www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/mouthmoves.html

Roy, Ashley. Picture Perfect Popcorn! http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/passages/royel.html

 

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