Oh My Gosh!!!

 

Ashley James

 

Beginning Literacy Lesson Design

 

 Rationale. 

In order for beginning readers to become fluent readers, students must first be accurate decoders.  And in order for students to become accurate decoders, they must learn different letter-sound correspondences.  The first set of correspondences students should learn are the short vowels because they are the most difficult to master.  In this lesson we will focus on the short o correspondence o = /o/.  In this lesson, students will learn to spell and read three, four, and five phoneme words containing the o = /o/ correspondence as well as words containing a = /a/, e = /e/, and i = /i/ correspondences (these should have been taught before the short o correspondence).  

 

Materials.

Chalkboard/Chalk

Chart with tongue tickler “Olly the Octopus likes Olives

Elkonin boxes for each student (up to 5 boxes)

Letters for each student (b, o, g, r, c, k, t, p, n, d, s, h, l, c, a, e, m, f)

Flashcards for words (bog, rock, top, nod, shot, clock, last, spot, rest, stomp, frost, strong)

Book: Bob’s Odd Gifts by: Leya Roberts. Austin, Tex. : Steck-Vaughn, c1999. (one copy per student and one for teacher)

Flashcards with pseudo words (rof, lon, nom, dob, bot)

 

 Procedures

I will review the short vowels correspondences a = /a/, e = /e/, and i = /i/.  Then I will introduce the new correspondence, o = /o/.  “SO FAR, WE HAVE TALKED ABOUT THREE VOWELS: A, E, AND I.  WHAT SOUND DOES SHORT A MAKE?  SOMEONE TELL ME A WORD THAT HAS A SHORT A.  WHO WANTS TO COME UP TO THE BOARD AND WRITE THAT WORD?” Repeat this for vowels e and i.  “FOR US TO BECOME FLUENT READERS, WE MUST LEARN MORE CORRESPONDENCES.  TODAY, WE ARE GOING TO LEARN THE CORRESPONDENCE FOR THE SHORT O.”

I will introduce the short o vowel using a meaningful representation. “HAVE YOU EVERY GOTTEN A REALLY COOL GIFT AND YOU WERE REALLY EXCITED?  USUALLY WHEN WE GET REALLY EXCITED, WE PUT OUR HANDS ON OUR CHEEKS AND WE SAY /o/.  THIS IS THE SOUND THAT THE SHORT O MAKES.  CAN YOU ALL PRACTICE THIS WITH ME?” Have the students practice being excited using the short o sound.

Give the students a tongue tickler to give them practice using the /o/ sound.  “I WANT YOU ALL TO SAY THIS WITH ME, OLLY THE OCTOPUS LIKES OLIVES.  GREAT.  THIS TIME, WE ARE GOING TO SAY EACH WORD SLOWLY AND PUT OUR HANDS ON OUR CHEEKS EVERY TIME WE HERE /o/.” 

Model how to find /o/ in spoken words and then let the students practice.  “NOW THAT WE KNOW o SAYS /o/ LIKE WE ARE EXCITED, WE ARE GOING TO SEE IF WE CAN FIND THAT SOUND IN SOME WORDS.  I WANT TO KNOW IF THERE IS A SHORT O SOUND IN THE WORD SOCK.  SO I AM GOING TO STRETCH THE WORD OUT AND SEE IF I HEAR THE EXCITED SOUND.  IF I DO, I’M GOING TO PUT MY HAND ON MY CHEEKS AND I KNOW THERE IS A SHORT O IN THE WORD.  SSSS-OOOO-CCCC-KKKK, YES, I HEARD THE EXCITED SOUND SO THAT MEANS THERE IS A SHORT O IN THE WORD SOCK.  NOW I WANT YOU TO TRY IT.”  Call out different words (stop, olive, mat, box, rock, tag) and have the students tell whether or not they have the short o sound.

Do a group letterbox lesson using the /o/ sound.  "NOW I WANT YOU TO SPREAD OUT ALL OF YOUR LETTERS FOR OUR LESSON AND MAKE SURE YOU CAN SEE ALL OF THEM.  WE ARE GOING TO TRY TO SPELL SOME WORDS.  REMEMBER, PUT EACH SOUND IN ITS OWN BOX!  I'LL SHOW YOU HOW TO SPELL ONE FIRST.  I WANT TO SPELL BOG.  BOG HAS THREE SOUNDS SO I NEED THREE BOXES.    BBB-000-GGG  THE FIRST SOUND /b/ GOES IN THE FIRST BOX. THE SECOND SOUND IS /o/, LIKE I’M EXCITED.  IT GOES IN THE SECOND BOX. THE THIRD SOUND IS/g/.  IT GOES IN THE LAST BOX.  REMEMBER, SOME BOXES MAY HAVE TWO LETTERS IN IT IF THEY MAKE ONE SOUND.    NOW IT IS YOUR TURN TO SPELL SOME WORDS."  Tell students to use their letterboxes to spell the following words: 3 phoneme - [bog, rock, top, nod, shot], 4 phoneme - [clock, last, spot, rest], and 5 phoneme - [stomp, frost, strong,].  Once students have spelled all the words, have them read the words in a different order off of flashcards. If the students are having trouble reading a word, isolate the vowel sound using a cover-up and then blend body-coda.

Give children practice reading the /o/ sound.  "NOW WE ARE GOING TO READ A BOOK CALLED BOB’S ODD GIFTS. IT IS FARMER BOB’S BIRTHDAY AND HIS FRIENDS ARE THROWING HIM A SURPRISE BIRTHDAY PARTY.  EACH OF HIS FRIENDS WORK VERY HARD TRYING TO PICK HIM OUT A GIFT HE WILL LOVE.  DO YOU THINK FARMER BOB WILL BE SURPRISED BY HIS PARTY?  DO YOU THINK HE WILL LIKE HIS GIFTS?  WELL, YOU WILL HAVE TO READ THE STORY TO FIND OUT.Ask children to read the book silently, then I will read the book to the class.  When finished, ask what words contained the /o/ sound and make a class chart.

For assessment, give the students a pseudo word test to see if they can decode the /o/ sound.  Call students one by one and ask them to read rof, lon, nom, dob, bot.  "THESE AREN'T REAL WORDS, BUT I WANT YOU TO SEE IF YOU CAN READ THESE SILLY WORDS TO ME."

 

References

Amber Clark, Eddie the Elephant http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/sightings/clarkbr.html


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