Don't Say a Word!

 

 

 

Frazier Montiel

Growing Independence and Fluency Lesson

 

 

 

Rationale: To be considered a fluent reader, a student must not only be able to read out loud but must also read silently. However, while reading silently, the student must still comprehend the reading. In this lesson, students will learn to read silently by watching the modeling, by reading and rereading connected text, James and the Good Day.

 

Materials:  class set of James and the Good Day, sentence strip with „Red is a fat pig. He is sad.š written on it, and silent reading check list

Check List:

___ Reads Aloud

___ Reads in a whisper

___ Reads while moving lips

___ Reads silently

 

 

Procedure:

1. Introduction. „We have learned to decode words. We have learned the letter and sound correspondences. And, all of you have become fluent, successful readers.š „Today, we are going to work on reading silently. You are already doing so well reading aloud that we are going to try reading silently to ourselves. When you read silently, you can read faster. And, you usually don‚t read out loud in public. So, practicing reading silently is very important.š

 

2. Explain and Model. „When you read silently, you say the words in your head. You do not make a sound when you silent read. If you come to a word that you are not sure of, you can use cover-ups just like when you are reading aloud. I am going to show you how to read silently. First, I am going to read the sentence out loud. „Red is a fat pig. He is sad.š Now, I am going to read in a whisper. (Read sentence). The next step is reading with just moving our lips. (Read sentence). Now, I am going to read the sentence to myself. We must remember to be sure that we understand the story as we are reading silently.š

 

3. Next, I will pass a copy of James and the Good Day to each student. Give a book talk: „James wants to have a good day. He decides to sail his boat in the tub. But, he forgets to turn the water off. What do you think will happen? Will there be a big mess? You will have to read James and the Good Day to find out.š

 

4. Practice:š Now, you will read James and the Good Day silently. After we all finish reading, we will talk about the story to be sure that everyone understood.š

 

5. Assessment: I will walk around the room and watch each student reading. I will use this checklist to assess their silent reading.

 

  

Check List:

___ Reads Aloud

___ Reads in a whisper

___ Reads while moving lips

___ Reads silently

 

After each student is finished reading, we will discuss the book as a group. I will ask questions such as „What happened to James?š and „Did he have a good day?š.  I will assess the answers that the students give to check and be sure that they understood what they read silently.

 

References:

Reynolds, Gina. You Can‚t Hear Me. http://www.auburn.edu/7Emurraba/innov/reynoldsgf.html.

 

James and the Good Day. Educational Insights. 1990.

 

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