Emergent Literacy Design

 

The Icky Sticky Frog
Amy Crump

 

Rationale:  "Phoneme awareness is the ability to identify phonemes, the vocal gestures from which words are constructed, when they are found in their natural context--spoken words." Teaching phoneme awareness will help children in learning to spell and read.  It enables students to section, utilize, and blend sounds in spoken words.  The goal of this lesson is that young students will be able to recognize the phoneme /i/.  This lesson will enable children to find the phoneme /i/ and identify it in everyday reading by reviewing a meaningful symbol and letter representation. 

Materials:

Pencil

Primary paper

 One Poster containing: a Phoneme Picture (sticky fingers) and the tongue twister; "The important Indian was ill with injuries inside the igloo."

 The Icky Sticky Frog by Dawn Bentley and illustrated by Salina Yoon

 Flash cards with pictures of objects with short /i/ and some with objects that do not have the short /i/.  Flash cards will include

Short /i/-

                                         

 Igloo          Sink          Grill

 

    Not short /i/-

 

Pot                 Lamp            Frog

 

 

Procedure:

 1. I will begin the lesson by explaining to my students the importance of our mouth’s movements when we say certain sounds, keeping it simple.  Children need phoneme awareness to learn to read because letters represent phonemes in words. "Today we are going to learn the short vowel /i/."  "Can anyone tell me words that have the short vowel /i/ in them?"  "Great, stick, six, sick, sticky…are all words that contain the short vowel /i/."

 2. Does anyone like to get dirty?  What would you do if you spilt an entire bottle of glue on your hands?  I want everyone to hold there hands up and try to shake the glue off of your hands.  I want everyone to repeat “icky sticky,” while shaking the glue off of your hands; like the lady in the picture.  /.  Remember, pay close attention to the shape that your mouth makes when you are saying words containing the short vowel /i/. 

 3. Now boys and girls I am going to say a "tongue twister."  When I am done I want everyone to repeat it back to me.  "The important Indian was ill with injuries inside the igloo." Good job, many of these words contain the short vowel /i/.  Remember, pay close attention to the shape that your mouth makes when you are saying words containing the short vowel /i/. 

 4. First, I will model how to write an upper and lower case I to the entire classroom.  Then I will explain to the class how to do it.  Using primary paper and a pencil.   "For capital I, starts with a straight back, then give him his headdress and his moccasins."  "For lower case I, go down from the fence, and give him a feather."

 5. The class will now engage in an activity.  I will hold up two flash cards, one with an object that includes /i/ and one that does not.  Each student will raise their hand and tell me which object has the short vowel /i/ in its name.  I will then ask each draw something that is "Icky Sticky" and write a story about it using the short vowel /i/.

 6. I will read, The Icky Sticky Frog by Dawn Bentley and illustrated by Salina Yoon.  I will ask the class to listen for words that have the short vowel /i/ in them.  We will then read it a second time, have the children verbally say each word with the short vowel /i/, dragging out the phoneme. 

 7. As an assessment, I will give my students a picture worksheet.  Each student will circle all the pictures the have the short vowel /i/ in its name. 

 
    References:

 Dr. Bruce Murray, The Reading Genie,

Making Friends with Phonemes  

http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/phon.html


Teaching Letter Recognition

http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/letters.html

 
Phoneme Pictures with Short Vowels

http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/phonpics.html

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