Zoie The Bumble Bee Says ZZZzzz


Jessica Williams
Emergent Literacy

Rationale: Research proves that students must be able to visually recognize letters in order to learn to read (Adams 21). The students will learn to recognize the grapheme z and the phoneme /z/ in spoken words. I will use a story and comparative words for the students to recognize the phoneme and the students will learn to write the grapheme.


Materials:

Poster With Tongue Twister: Zoie zooms and zigzags through the zoo.

Primary Paper

Pencils

Worksheet For Assessment With Pictures Of: Zebra, Book, Zero, Frisbee, Zoo, Mitt, and Zipper.

Book: The Z Was Zapped by Chris Van Allburg

Large Posters Of Graphemes From Previous Lessons


Procedures:

1. Review the previously taught graphemes and phonemes. Use large posters of graphemes.
Ex. Hold the poster for the grapheme m . Ask students, "What letter do I have here? Good!"
Next, ask students, "What sound does m make? Good!" Review a through y.
2. Hold the poster for the grapheme z. Ask, "What letter do I have here? It's a z! Good!"
3. "The z makes the sound /z/. It sounds like a bumble bee!" Model: Make /z/ and flutter hands like the wings of a bumble bee.
"Let's all try together! I hear /z/ in zoom." Stretch out sound.
"Let's all say zoom and make sure to stretch out the /z/ sound and flutter the wings! Great!"
4. Students will listen to comparative words to listen for /z/.
"I want you to listen for /z/ as I read some words. Do you hear /z/ in zone or cone? Good!"
"I hear /z/ in zone because I can stretch out the /z/ sound. In zero or hero? In zoo or food? Good!"
5. Show students poster with tongue twister. "Let's practice /z/ with this tongue twister!"
"I will read the tongue twister and then we will read it together!" Read From Poster.
"Zoie zooms and zigzags through the zoo." Read Again.
"Now, I will stretch out the /z/ sound and flutter my wings. First, watch me!"
"ZZZoie zzzooms and zzzigzzzags through the zzzoo. Let's try it together!" Read Again.
6. Students will need primary paper and a pencil. "The letter z makes /z/. I will show you."
"We will begin with the capital letter Z." Model.
"We will start at the rooftop, go over some, make a slanted line to the sidewalk, and over."
"Let's try it together!" Repeat Steps. "Put your pencil down when you have finished."
"I want you to make five Z's after I have looked at your letter."
7. "Now, I will show you how to make a lowercase z." Model.
"We will start at the fence, go over some, make a slanted line to the sidewalk, and over."
"Let's try it together!" Repeat Steps. "Put your pencil down when you have finished."
"I want you to make five more z's after I have looked at your letter."
"Now, when you hear the /z/ sound you will know it makes the letter z."
8. "Now, we will read a book called The Z Was Zapped."
"The book tells the story of each letter in the alphabet. What do you think happens?"
Read The Book. "I want you to make the motions we have learned for each letter."
Children will make the motions they have learned as we read the book.
9. Assessment: The students will complete a worksheet. The worksheet will have pictures of different items. The students will color the items that begin with the /z/ sound.
They will cross out the pictures that do not begin with the /z/ sound.

The pictures will be of: Zebra, Book, Zero, Frisbee, Zoo, Mitt, and Zipper.

Reference:

Chris Van Allsburg. The Z Was Zapped. Houghton Mifflin Company. 1987.

Marilyn Jager Adams. Beginning To Read: Thinking and Learning about Print.

            The Reading Research and Education Center. 1990. 21.

Cassie Simpson. "The B Beat"

            http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/odysseys/simpsonel.html

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