Expression?!?! Where?!?!


Growing Independence and Fluency Plan

By: Amanda Merkel

Rationale: Skillful, lifelong readers all have something in common. They all read with fluency. Fluency is a term that encompasses a few different things, such as reading quickly (faster than beginning readers), reading with accuracy and automaticity, having the ability to read silently, wanting to read voluntarily, reading smoothly, and with expression. This lesson focuses on reading with expression. Reading with expression is very important in developing fluency. Only fluent readers can read with expression. This makes a book come alive when you're reading it and pulls your audience into the book. The students will do several things with expression including listening to different expressions, recognizing punctuation that relates to expression, and practicing reading with expression to a partner. 

Materials:

~ The Story of Lightning and Thunder by Ashley Bryan

~Sample sentences (one that can be said with many different expressions) with no punctuation ex. We won, Help

~White board and markers to write sample sentences and its different punctuation

~ A Pig is Moving In! by Claudia Fries

~Assessment sheet
___Did the student change his/her voice from high to low when needed?
___Did the student change his/her voice from loud to soft when needed?
___Did the student recognize the punctuation mark present at the end of each sentence and read it accordingly?
___Did the student consistently read with expression throughout the story?
___Did the student respond well to peer or teacher suggestions when reading?

Procedures:

1)   "Class, now we are going to learn how to read with expression. Who can tell me what that means?" The teacher should wait for answers and respond to them appropriately. "Those are all very good answers! Reading with expression means that you read the story like you believe it would sound if it were happening in real life. Say that I was being chased by a dinosaur. If that were really happening how do you think I'd ask for help? Do you think I'd say it very quiet and calm? No? Would I yell it at the top of my lungs? Yeah, that dinosaur might get me. I would need for someone to hear me and come to my rescue." Write a period, an exclamation point, and a question mark on the board. Review with students what each mark means. "Let's go back to my dinosaur story. If you were writing about me getting chased by a dinosaur and you wanted me to cry out help which one of these marks would you use" Hopefully they will say exclamation mark if not ask them questions to get them to say that. Discuss with the class why they should not use a question mark or a period in this case.

2) "Class, I need you to put on your listening ears. We're going to read a book by Ashley Bryan called The Story of Thunder and Lightning. I'm going to read it with lots of expression. Listen and see if you can tell all the times I use expression." You might want to explain that this a folk story from Africa.

3) "Did you like that book? Do you think you would have liked it as much if I would have read it like this?" Reread the page very monotone; maybe even throw a fake yawn in there. "Would you have stayed awake if I had read it that way? I almost put myself to sleep!! What was different from the way I read it the first time and the second time. Well, I did read with expression but what does that mean?" Discuss this with the students. Write the example sentence on the board. We won. Ask the class how they would say this if there was a question mark at the end. "We won? That almost sounds like he didn't know that they won. What? We won? How? How would it sound if there was a period at the end? Good. That's almost like yeah, we won. I knew we would. It's not a big deal. What about if there was an exclamation point at the end? Ya'll like those exclamation points don't you? Good job. That's almost like wow! We won! We beat the BEST team in the league!"

4) "Class let's practice saying sentences. I want you to think of at least one sentence that would end with a question mark, an exclamation point, or a period. Not one of all three, just think of one sentence. Think of it real hard and then we'll write everyone's on the board with the correct punctuation." Give the class enough time that everyone can come up with a sentence. Write them on the board and discuss what punctuation each sentence would have. "I love the sentences each one of you came up with. Ya'll are so smart!"

5)  Pass out A Pig is Moving In! by Claudia Fries. "Class we're going to read A Pig is Moving In! In this book rabbit, fox, and hen all together in the same building. They find out that a pig is moving. They are all upset because they know that pigs are dirty, sloppy, and smelly. One day fox sees pig walking up to his room with a big basket of sticks. The pig drops a bunch of them and makes a huge mess. Are fox, rabbit, and hen right about the pig or will he prove to be a great neighbor? To find out I want you to read the book silently to yourself first. Pay close attention to the punctuation marks that are on each page. Think about how this would sound if it were really taking place. After you read the book you'll break up into partners and read it to each other with lots of expression. When you get done reading silently, look up at me so I'll know that you're done." Give the students five or six minutes to complete.

6) Break students into pairs of two. "Alright, now you're going to read the book to your neighbor with your best expressions. It's to feel a little silly. I feel silly each time I read a book a loud. One of you will read the first page and your partner will read the next page."


7) As they are reading, I will walk around and use the following checklist to assess the students䴜 use of expression when reading:
___Did the student change his/her voice from high to low when needed?
___Did the student change his/her voice from loud to soft when needed?
___Did the student recognize the punctuation mark present at the end of each sentence and read it accordingly?
___Did the student consistently read with expression throughout the story?
___Did the student respond well to peer or teacher suggestions when reading?

-References:

            -Claudia Fries, A Pig is Moving In!.  Siphano Picture Books. (2000).  Twenty-four pages.

            -Ashley Bryan, The Story of Thunder and Lightning .  Macmillan Publishing Company. (1993).  Twenty-six pages.

~Maggie Saye http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/odysseys/sayegf.html 

            ~Vicki Burns  http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/navig/burnsgf.html

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