Bumbling Bees and Double Doozies


   


Sarah Abbott

Emergent Literacy

     

Rationale:

          To be good readers and writers is a hard task. It is important for children to learn the letters of the alphabet, and the sounds they make. The letters b and d and their sounds /b/ and /d/ can sometimes be really hard. The purpose of this lesson is for the students to learn the concepts of letter-sound recognition.

Materials:

Pencils

Primary Paper

Dry Erase Board with Markers

Pictures with things that start with b and d (students may color) - Butterfly, Bumblebees, Buckets, Bears, Dogs, Dice, Duck, and Dove.

Procedures:

Introduce the lesson by explaining to the students that reading and writing are everywhere and we need to learn how to read and write for everyday life. We will begin talking about the b. I will say, "We are going to learn about the letter b." I will ask the students if anyone know what sounds the letter b makes. "The letter b makes the /b/ sound. You can hear the /b/ sound in buckets and bear. Who can tell me what other words start with the /b/ sound?"

I will then hold up different pictures with the /b/ sound. We will discuss the sound we hear at the beginning of each word. "Bumblebees. Let's say that sound at the beginning of bumblebees. /b/. Excellent! What letter is that?" We then think about the /b/ sound by talking about the heartbeat. "Who can tell me what sound the heartbeat makes? Good! The heartbeat makes a bbbb sound." While explaining the heartbeat sound I will pat my chest. I will then ask the students to pat their chest while making the bbbbbb sound. I will then: "When I say /b/, what does my mouth look like? Look at my lips start out together and then open and a puff of air come out. Now let's practice."

I then have the students say: "Black Bugs Bleed Black Blood." I will first demonstrate aloud how to say the tongue twister by exaggerating the /b/ sounds in the tongue twister. Then the students will say the tongue twister.

Next we will work on writing upper and lowercase Bs. "To write an uppercase B we will start at the rooftop and go straight down to the sidewalk. Let's now give the line a chest and a tummy." I will demonstrate this while I am talking. "Ok now it is your turn. Say it with me while you practice." We then practice five times saying the helpful sentence.

"To write a lowercase b you make a lowercase c between the fence and the sidewalk. Then draw a line connecting the c together." I will demonstrate while I am talking. "Ok now it is your turn, say it with me while you practice." We then practice five times saying the helpful sentence.

We then talk about the letter D I will say: "Next, we are going to learn about the letter D." I will ask the students if anyone know what sounds the letter D makes. "The letter D makes the /d/ sound. You can hear the /d/ sound in dogs and dice. Who can tell me what other words start with the /d/ sound?"

I will then hold up different pictures with the /d/ sound. We will discuss the sound we hear at the beginning of each word. "Dogs. Let's say that sound at the beginning of dogs. /d/. Excellent! Now what letter is that?" We will then think about the /d/ sound by talking about a puttering old car. "Who can tell me what sound the puttering car makes? Good! The puttering car makes a /d/, /d/, /d/, /d/ sound." While explaining the puttering car I will act like I am driving a car. I will then ask the students to ace like they are driving a car while making the /d/, /d/, /d/ sound. Then I will say: "When I say /d/ how does my mouth look? Look at my mouth, it is open and my tongue is on the roof of my mouth. I then let out air by bringing my tongue back down. Now let's practice."

I will then have my students say: "Double Bubble Gum, Bubbles Double." I will first demonstrate aloud how to say the tongue twister by exaggerating the /d/ sounds in the tongue twister. Then the students will say the tongue twister.

Next we will work on writing upper and lowercase Ds. "To write an upper case D start at the rooftop and draw a straight line down to the sidewalk. Then make a big backwards c by starting at the top of the line and finishing at the sidewalk." I will demonstrate this while I am talking. "Ok, now it is your turn. Say it with me while you practice." We then practice five times saying the helpful sentence.

"To write a lowercase d you draw a c from the fence to the sidewalk. Then make a line from the rooftop to the sidewalk connecting to the c." I will demonstrate while I am talking. "Ok, now it is your turn, say it with me while you practice." We then practice five times saying the helpful sentence.

I will then read: "Brown Bear, Brown Bear," Concentrating on the B's.

Assessment:

          Give the students a sheet with different pictures of items that start with /b/ and /d/. The students may color these pictures. The students will identify pictures that start with a /b/. By putting a square around it. The student will then identify pictures that start with /d/ by circling the picture. I will then ask the student what the object is and what it starts with. This is for letter recognition.

References:

            Powell, Megan. Emergent Literacy. Butterflies and Dragonflies.
 

Collins, Virginia. Emergent Literacy. Bad Baby D.

Murray, Bruce. Teaching Letter Recognition. http://www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/letters.html

 
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