Bouncing and Dancing with B and D
 
dancingdog

Emergent Literacy Design

Michelle Mazza

 

Rationale: It is important for beginning readers to learn how to identify letters and listen for the sounds the letters make. This lesson is designed to help students learn to recognize the difference between b=/b/ and d=/d/. These two letters look similar and sometimes the same to children. Therefore, they are often confused because b and d are the same shape in a different order. During the lesson, students will have the chance to practice seeing and hearing the letters and sounds for better recognitions. Also, it is very important that children learn the proper motions of how letters are formed to comprehend their meaning. Through practice and direct instruction, students will be able to see and understand the difference between b and d.

 

Materials:

- Cards with the letters b and d written on them

- Pictures of things beginning with the letter b (bike, box, bunny, bat)

- Pictures of things beginning with the letter d (door, dog, doll, duck)

- Pictures of things that contain the letters b and d (bed, bead, bread)

- Primary Paper for each student

- Pencils for each student

- Index cards with the letters the letter b written on one side and the letter d on the other side for each student

- Book Berenstain Bears Go up and Down.

 

 

 Explain and model the day’s lesson to the students.

1. Introduce the lesson by explaining that we are going to learn about two letters that are at times very tricky. These letters are b (hold up b card) and d (hold up d card). Can someone raise his or her hand and tell me what sound b makes? Good, let’s say it together /b/, /b/. Now, do you know what sound d makes? Let’s say it all together now, /d/, /d/.

 

2. Tell students:  Now we are going to play a little game to see if we hear the /b/ or /d/ sound in the following words.  If you hear a /b/ sound, hold up your card with the b on it and if you hear a /d/ sound, hold up the card with the d on it.  Ask students:

“Do you hear the /b/ sound in big or dig?”

“Do you hear the /d/ sound in did or big?”

“Do you hear the /b/ sound in ball or doll?”

“Do you hear the /d/ sound in dug or bug?”

“Do you hear the /b/ sound in dock or block?”

 

3. Now, let’s try two tongue twisters.  In the first one, we are going to listen for the /b/ sound.  “Betty baked banana bread for baby’s birthday.”  Ok now lets try that all together.  Great job, now lets do it one more time, but this time, when you hear a /b/ sound, hold up the index card with the letter b on it.  Boys and girls, you did a great job of identifying the /b/ sounds!  Now, let’s try a tongue twister and listen for the /d/ sound.  “Daisy Duck dug dirt out of the ditch.” Good job, now lets go over the tongue twister again but this time, when you hear a /d/ sound, hold up the index card with the letter d on it.  Good job identifying the /d/ sounds!

 

4.  Practice and model letter formation
Now, we are going to practice writing the letter b and the letter d.  I need for everyone to get out their primary paper and a pencil.  First, I am going to show you how to write the letter b and I want everyone to pay very close attention.  As I write the letter b I am going to say “start up at the roof, go down and bbbounce up to the fence and around.”  Ok I want everyone to practice writing a letter b by moving your pencil as you say “start up at the roof, go down and bound up to the fence and around.”    Now, on your own paper practice writing five more b’s.  Next, we are going to practice writing a lower case d.  We all know how to make a little c right?  Ok well for little d we start off just like we start for little c.  I am going to show you how to write the letter d so pay close attention.  As I write the letter d I am going to say “first little c, then little d.”  Now, on your own paper practice writing five more d’s. 

 

5.  Connect the lesson on /b/ and /d/ with the book, The Berenstain Bears Go Up and Down. 

You all did such a great job with the letters b and d today, and I am very proud!  Now, we are going to read a story about The Bernstain Bears going up and down on an escalator.  As one bear goes down the up escalator, chaos breaks out!  To find out what happens to the bear who went the wrong way up the moving stairs, you will have to finish reading The Berenstain Bears Go Up and Down.  Also in the story, there are a lot of words that begin with the letters b and d.  I want you all to pay very close attention to the story, because when you hear me read a word that begins with a letter b you should hold up the index card with the letter b on it.  If you hear me read a word with the letter d on it, you need to hold up the index card with the letter d on it.  Begin by reading the title “The Berenstain Bears go Up and Down ” to make sure that the students understand the directions. 

 

6.  Assessment

The students will be assessed based on their primary paper to see how well they wrote the letters b and d.  I will also pay very close attention to the student’s active performance during the reading activity.  I.e.: the majority of the students correctly identify the /b/ and /d/ sounds during the reading.  The final assessment will be given by providing each student with a worksheet with several pictures on it.  The pictures will represent things that either begin with a b or d.  For example, bug, duck, dog and bench.  Underneath each picture will be a blank line for the child to either write b or d on it. 

 

References:

- Berenstain, Stan and Jan. The Bernstain Bears Go Up and Down. New York: Random House, 1982. 32 pp.

- Tate, Natalie. Emergent Literacy. Big Bad b and d. http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/persp/tateel.html

- Wallach, M.A. & Wallach, L. (1976). Teaching All Children to Read. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Wallach and Wallach’s Tongue Twisters: http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/twisters.html



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