Tommy the Clock Tick Tocks Today and Tomorrow

Emergent Literacy Design

Evelyn Griffin

 

 

Rationale: Recognizing the relationship of songs and written words is very important for beginning readers. As Marilyn Adams states, “Just as cars will not start without spark plugs, reading cannot begin with the spark of recognition.” In this lesson, students will learn about the phoneme /t/. Students will hear the sound, mimic what mouth movement makes the sound, and see how the phoneme appears on paper.

 

Materials:

Primary Paper

Pencils

Crayons

Items that have the phoneme /t/ (toilet paper, tangerine, tape, tarantula)

Items that don’t have the phoneme /t/ (pencil, drink, etc.)

A clock

Worksheet

 

Procedures:

 

1.  Today we are going to learn about the /t/ sound. In writing, it is represented by the letter t. If you listen closely to the clock, you can hear the /t/ sound while it tick-tocks.

2.  Let’s mimic the clock by making the sound and moving our arms. When you say tick tock, what happens to your tongue on the /t/ sound? It touches your two top front teeth very quickly.

3.  Lets see if you hear /t/ in some treasures I have.

Toilet Paper- yes..... tttttttt oilet paper

Pencil- no

Drink- no

Tangerine- yes...... ttttttt angerine

Tape- yes...... ttttt ape

Magnet- yes ......magne ttttt

4.  Repeat chant:

Do what I do and say what I say.  Tommy the Clock Tick-Tocks Today and Tomorrow. Class: Tommy the Clock Tick-Tocks Today and Tomorrow.

    Do what I do and say what I say.  Tommy the Clock Tick-Tocks Today and Tomorrow.

    Class:Tommy the Clock Tick-Tocks Today and Tomorrow.

    Do what I do and say what I say.  TTTommy the Clock TTTick-TTTTocks TTTToday     and  TTTTomorrow.

    Class: TTTommy the Clock TTTick-TTTTocks  TTTToday and TTTTomorrow.

 

            Can you hear the /t/ sound?

5.  Teach students how to make lower case and capital “t” ‘s on paper. With a lower case “t”, start in between the roof and the fence and go straight down to the sidewalk. Then, make a smaller line crossing at the fence. For the capital “T,” begin at the roof and make a straight line down to the sidewalk. Then, make a horizontal line on the roof.

6.    Ask students to compare words you say aloud. Do you hear /t/ in tug or pull? light or dark? ten or nine? cute or ugly? hot or cold?

7.   Let’s read Tick Tock by Eileen Browne. Raise your hand when you hear words with the /t/ sound.

8.   For an assessment, students will do a worksheet. They will color the pictures that have the /t/ sound in them.

 

 

References:

 

Browne, Eileen. Tick-Tock. Walker, 1996.

 

Marilyn Jager Adams (1990). Beginning to Read: Thinking and Learning About Print, A Summary by Steven A.Stahl, Jean Osborn, and Fran Lehr. Urbana, IL: Center for the Study of Reading.

 

 

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