"On Your Mark, Get Set, Read!"

Growing Independency and Fluency

Brittany Cofer

Rationale: after students become fluent readers, the develop better comprehension. Children need to focus on becoming fast and smooth readers. In the Adams book it says, “Skillful reading depends critically upon the speed and completeness with which words can be identified from the visual forms. (Adams 59).

Materials:

Marker                                                       Racecar paper

Board                                                         Pencil

Sentence Strips                                         Sticky-tack

Stopwatch for each group                       Board with track (numbered 10-100)

Dogs At Work book for each group

 

Procedure:

1.    Teacher will explain to students the importance of fluency and comprehension. Teacher will say, “Today we are going to learn about fluency, which means to read faster. With fluency, we will be able to better understand what we are reading. It will also be more fun to read!” Teacher will write the sentence, Willy hit a home run to win the game!” on the board.” "Now let's listen to how different this sentence can sound. I can say it like "W-i-ll-y h-i-t a h-o-me r-u-n to w-i-n the g-a-me."Or "Willy hit a home run to win the game!" Which do you think sound better? By being fluent, I can add expression the second time to show the excitement. Let's practice and see if we can read fluently and with expression!"

2.    Teachers will separate students into groups of two. Each students will receive a piece of paper with the sentence, "I was surprised when it started to rain." Teacher will say, " I want each group member to take turns reading the sentence to their partner. Pay attention to the way you read the sentence the first time, then read the sentence six times. The will help you read faster and understand the sentence better. (Give students time.) Read the sentence to you partner again." After students are done, the teacher will ask, "Did you notice a difference between your first and last time reading the sentence? What makes it sound better? (Smoother and faster) Great job everyone!

3.     Students will stay in the groups and be given the book, Dogs At Work. Teacher will introduce book saying, "This book is about dogs that have special dogs, just like humans have dogs. Some even deal with criminals! Let's read and find out what their job is!" Teacher will say, "As one group member reads, the other member will time their partner for one minute. The reader needs to read as many words as they can, and use deconding skills if they approach an unknown word. I will be walking around making sure everyone is doing his or her job. We will do this several times, so we can read fast! Each partner should record the number of words read in the minute allowed on a racecar and use sticky-tack to stick the car on the track board."

Assessment: Each student will come to the teacher and read Dogs At Work while being timed for one minute. They will present their information form their group, so the teacher can compare their words read with the current assessment. The teacher will record the new number on a racecar and allow the student to put their car on the board next to their other racecar from their group time to track their progress.

References:

Dogs At Work

Pettus, Kasey. "Ready, Set, Read." http://auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/connect/pettusgf.html

 

http://auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/invitations.html