Let’s sum it all up!


Reading to Learn

Ashley Wood
 

Rationale: Comprehension is the main goal in reading. Children need to be capable of reading the words in a text, but also able to draw information from what they read. A great way for students to learn to do this is by teaching summarization. The students will be able to read a piece of text and summarize it to pull away the important information in the passage.

Materials:
Steps to Summarizing poster (1. Delete anything that you know is not important in the story. 2. Pick out items and events that you know are important. 3. Compose a
    statement that covers everything the writer is saying about the topic.)

Any book at the students’ desk to practice during silent reading
Dry erase board/ chalkboard
A copy of  “NASA Planning Travel to Moon and Mars” for each student
Highlighter for each student
Assessment checklist
                                                                                          
                                                                                                           
Yes            No

Delete trivia and redundancies
            Super ordinate items and events
            Find or compose a statement that covers
                everything the writer is saying about the topic

Procedure:

1. Begin the lesson by explaining what summarizing is. “Summarizing is when we read something and we make a statement that covers everything the writer is saying about the topic. A summary does not include details, but does include the main idea. When we read a passage we should take away the main idea, which is also the meaning or reason that the writer is writing the passage. In today’s lesson, we are going to do some reading and learn how to summarize.”

2. “First, we are going to review how to read silently. Remember, when we read silently no one else should be able to hear us. We basically just read to ourselves in our head. If everyone in the class is reading silently, I should not hear anything. Let me read a page out of my book and remind you how to read silently. Now, I want you to take out the book in your desk and read one page silently to make sure everyone understands.”

3. Take out the class poster with the steps for summarizing. “Now we are going to look at the three steps that you take when you want to summarize a story. You must first read the story before you can summarize. First, delete anything that you know is not important in the story. Next, pick out items and events that you know are important. Last, compose a statement that covers everything the writer is saying about the topic. These are the steps you should take when you want to summarize something that you have read.”

4. You should now model for the students how to summarize. Use an informational text such as Space probes to the Planets, which can be found in the Scott Foresman fourth grade basal reader that the class has all recently read and will be familiar with to model how to summarize. “Remember when we read this story yesterday? Well I am going to show you how to summarize using this sense we can all recall what the story was about.” Go through the steps of summarizing, jotting important parts on the board to use for the final statement that will be used to summarize the story. Make sure to emphasize that details should be left out and that we are only trying to get the main idea in our summary.

5. “Now that you have seen how to summarize, you are going to do it!” Pass out a copy of “NASA Planning Travel to Moon and Mars” to each student. Give a short introduction (similar to a book talk) about the article. “President Bush wants people on the moon by the year 2020 and NASA has big plans to make this happen. We have been learning in science about space and the different planets. Let’s read this passage and see what all NASA has planned for the future!”

6. Instruct students to read the passage silently. Instruct the students to use a highlighter when finished reading to highlight information that they think is important. Students should not highlight any information that is details.

7. When all of the students are finished reading and highlighting, pair them up to work to summarize the article. Students should compare what each of them highlighted and discuss what they consider important, and what they think should be deleted in order to make a summary.

8. Assessment: Each pair’s summary will be used as an assessment tool. The teacher will assess their summary using a checklist containing the three rules that were reviewed for summarizing.

 

Resources:

Abbott, Patrick. NASA Planning Travel to Moon and Mars. National Geographic Kids.

Estill, Laura. Some Simple Rules to Sum it Up! http://www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/guides/estillrl.html


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