Buh Bee and Duh Dee

Emergent Literacy Design
Megan Kerns
                                                                            

 

Rationale:  It is proven that it is important for young readers to listen for the sounds in words in order to help them learn to connect language and reading. Through my experience thus far, I have found that many students struggle with recognizing the difference between the letters b and d both in their reading and writing.  These two letters can be very confusing for young learners to recognize the difference between.  This lesson will help emphasize these two consonant sounds and to allow children to practice recognizing these two letters and their writing skills of them.  Today, the goal is for the students will learn to recognize these letters in spoken words by learning a meaningful representation and a letter symbol, then practice finding these letters in written and spoken words, and then practice writing these letters on primary paper. 

Materials:  Primary writing paper and pencils, picture card of heart, picture card of door and hand knocking, tongue twister posters: Billy bounced the ball and blew bubbles and Dan danced all day with his dog till dark., dry erase board and marker, picture cards with words that have b and d: ball, bat, bumblebee, dog, diver, desk, Silly Sally by Audrey Wood, blank drawing paper and crayons, two worksheets, one with the letter b and d on it: basketball, bird, bridge, doll, dish, dollar and one with pictures of things that start with the letter b and d: camera, basket, donut, cup, banana, dock, mop.  On the first one, they are to draw pictures of things that begin with that letter or have that letter in them.  On the second, they are to circle which pictures have the letter b or d in them.

Procedures:  1.  Introduce the lesson by explaining that our written language is a secret code and we must pay close attention to the smaller sounds we hear in words in order to understand them better and be better learners and readers. We are going to learn about two letters that look a lot a like and sometimes get us confused, b and d or /b/ and /d/.  As you all get to know these two letters better, you will be able to tell the difference much easier and be able to spot the /b/ and /d/ in all kinds of words.  

2.  Ask students:  Have any of you ever heard your own heart beat?  It kind of sounds like /buh buh/ /buh buh/.  Lets all make this hand gesture and pat our chests as we make this sound, /buh buh/.  This is the sound that the letter b makes too!  So the letter b makes, (patting our chests) /buh buh/.  Hold up the picture card of the heart with the letter b on it and show the students.  Have any of you ever heard someone knock on a door?  It kind of sounds like /duh duh/ /duh duh/.  Lets all make this hand gesture like we are knocking on a door as we make this sound, /duh duh/ /duh duh/.  This is the sound that the letter d makes!  So the letter d makes, (knocking on the door) /duh duh/.  Hold up the picture card of the door with a hand knocking and the letter d on it and show the students. 

3.  Lets try a couple tongue twisters (on poster).  Billy bounced the ball and blew bubbles.  Everybody say it out loud together.  Now say it again, and this time, stretch the /b/ at the beginning of each word that starts with b.  Bbbilly bbbounced the bbball and bbblew bbbubbbles.”  Try it again, and this time break the /b/ off each word.  “/b/ illy /b/ ounced the /b/ all and /b/ lew /b/ ubbles.  Now lets do the other one.  Dan danced all day with his dog till dark.”  Lets all say it together.  Now we will stretch the /d/ sound on each word that starts with d.  Dddan dddanced all ddday with his dddog till dddark.”  Now lets take the /d/ off each word.  “/d/ an /d/ anced all /d/ ay with his /d/ og till /d/ ark.” 

4.  (Have students take out primary writing paper and pencil).  Now, we are going to use the letters b and d to spell /b/ and /d/.  Follow me as I write it on the board.  Let’s start with the capital B. For capital B, start at the roof, go straight down to the sidewalk, down and around for his chest, and around for his big tummy. For lowercase b, start at the roof, go down b-b-bounce up and around. Now I want you to try. Next, let’s practice writing the letter d, beginning with the uppercase D.  For capital D, start at the roof, go straight down to the sidewalk, pick up, and go around. For lowercase d, first little c, then little d.  Now I want you to try.  So now when you see these letters in words, you will know that they spell /b/ and /d/.  I want you all to write each letter ten times on your writing paper so that we all have practice writing these letters. 

5.  Now I am going to show you how you find /b/ and /d/ in words.  In the word cab, I’m going to stretch out the sounds I hear in slow motion and listen for the heart beat.  /kkkaaa/, /kkaabbb/.  I hear heart beat and the /b/ at the end of the word cab.  In the word, bed, I’m going to stretch out the sounds I hear to listen for the knock on the door.  /bbbeee/, I hear the /b/ for b.  /bbbeeeddd/, I hear the knock at the door and the /d/ at the end of bed now! 

6.  Call on students to answer and say how they knew the answer.  Do you hear /b/ in ball or mall?  Set or bet?  Cob or mob?  Do you hear the /d/ in sad or sat?  Brown or down?  Bad or dad? 

7.  (Pass out picture cards with words that have b and d in them).  Look at your picture card and try to see if the word has one of our letters in it!  If it does, pat your chest or knock on your door to let us know it does! 

8.  Read Silly Sally by Audrey Wood and talk about the story.  Silly Sally is a crazy girl who loves to walk in crazy ways.  She walks upside down, sideways, and backwards to go to town!  But she meets special someone on her way!  Find out who she meets and what crazy things that perosn can do when you read, Silly Sally!  Re-read the book and have the students raise their hands when they hear words with the /b/ or /d/ sound and have them make the gesture as well.  Have them draw a picture of themselves walking in a crazy and funny way.  Have them put words on the side of the picture that have the letter b and d in them to describe how they would walk if they could.  Also, have them write a sentence describing their pictures and encourage them to use invented spelling.  Display their work.

Assessment:  The students will be evaluated on their participation and on their writing practice for each letter.  I will also hand out two worksheets, one with the letter b and d on it and one with pictures of things that start with the letter b and d.  On the first one, they are to draw pictures of things that begin with that letter or have that letter in them.  On the second, they are to circle which pictures have the letter b or d in them. 

Reference: 
Ebaugh, Jayme.  Emergent Litteracy:  bbb-bee and ddd-dee!  http://www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/constr/ebaughel.html

Murray, Bruce. Teaching Letter Recognition. http://www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/letters.html

Wood, Audrey.  Silly Sally.  New York, Scholastic Inc. 1992.  28 pages. 

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