Fishing for F
Emergent Reader Design
By: Christina Woods
 
 
Rationale
    In order for children to read and spell words, they must first be able to identify each letter in the alphabet and the phoneme it represents.  This         lesson will help children recognize the letter F in print and the phoneme /f/ in spoken words.  This goal will be met by having children listen for,     and repeat, the phoneme in spoken words, and by allowing children to create a meaningful representation using various objects that begin             with the letter F.
 
Materials
     Swimmy by Leo Lionni, alphabet chart, letter F precut from construction paper (1 for each student), glue, feathers, Froot Loops, small fish             cutouts, small flower cutouts, popsicle stick (1 for each student), sample of completed project, primary paper, pencil, Handi-wipes, fishing rod     (wooden dowel, fishing line, magnet at the end), construction paper fish with paper clips attached on the back (with a magazine picture on one     side, some of items with /f/ and some without-1 per student), fish bowl, chalk, chalkboard
 
Procedure
    1.      Begin by pointing to the letter Ff on the alphabet chart.  Express /f/ as the sound of a fizzing soda.  Have students make the fizzing sound     too.  DO YOU HEAR /f/ IN BOAT OR FISH?  FLOWER OR PLANT?  CAN YOU THINK OF ANY WORDS THAT SOUND LIKE THE FIZZING        SODA?  Be sure to emphasize the /f/ in each of the words.
   
    2.      Now the students will practice writing the letter Ff on the primary paper.  WE CAN USE THE LETTER F TO SPELL /f/.  WATCH AS I             WRITE THE LETTER F.  FOR UPPER CASE, GO DOWN, OVER FOR HIS HAT, AND OVER FOR HIS BELT; FOR LOWER CASE, START     WITH LITTLE C UP IN THE AIR, STRAIGHTEN IT OUT, GO DOWN, CROSS AT THE FENCE.  Create the letters on the chalkboard as you         name the steps for each.  LET'S ALL WRITE THE LETTER F NOW.  Name the steps as the class writes the letters.  

3.      Now refer to the sample of the project (letter F covered with feather, flowers, Froot Loops, and fish).  WHAT THINGS DO YOU SEE                 GLUED TO MY LETTER F (feathers, etc.)?  DO YOU HEAR /f/ IN FEATHER, FISH, ETC.? (stress the /f/ sound).  GOOD!  NOW YOU ARE         GOING TO GLUE ITEMS WITH THE /f/ SOUND ONTO YOUR LETTER F.  WAIT FOR ALL THE DIRECTIONS BEFORE YOU BEGIN.  Pass         out the materials (letter F's, glue, feathers, small fish, flowers, and Froot Loops).

4.      DIP YOUR FINGER IN THE GLUE AND TRACE OVER YOUR LETTER F.  (Place handi-wipes at the students' desks to clean the glue             from their fingers when they finish.)

5.      NOW I WANT YOU TO STICK THE OBJECTS ONTO YOUR F.  YOU CAN CHOOSE FROM F-F-FEATHERS, F-F-FISH, etc. (stress /f/).          WHEN YOU ARE DONE, PLACE IT IN THE CORNER OF YOUR DESK AND WAIT FOR THE GLUE TO DRY.  WHEN YOUR GLUE IS DRY,     YOU CAN GLUE THE POPSICLE STICK TO THE BOTTOM OF THE F AND WAIT UNTIL EVERYONE IS DONE.  

6.      When all the students are finished, read Swimmy by Leo Lionni.  THIS IS A STORY ABOUT A F-F-FISH NAMED SWIMMY AND ALL OF         HIS F-FRIENDS IN THE OCEAN.  ONE DAY THE F-F-FISH ARE SWIMMING AND THEY GET F-F-FRIGHTENED.  LET'S SEE WHAT             SCARED SWIMMY AND HIS F-F-FRIENDS.  WHILE I READ, I WANT YOU TO LISTEN FOR THE /f/ SOUND.  EACH TIME YOU HEAR IT I         WANT YOU TO RAISE YOUR F UP IN THE AIR AND THEN PUT IT BACK DOWN AND WAIT FOR THE SOUND AGAIN.
 
Assessment
    This will be done in the form of a fishing game.  Lay out the construction paper fish on the floor, picture down.  The students will take turns     using the fishing rod to "catch a fish".  Help the students identify the picture and if they hear the /f/ sound in the word, they will place the fish in     the fishbowl.  If they do not, they will hold the fish until everyone has had a turn.  This is an individual effort and a check list can be used to                 keep a record of each student's progress.  Once each child has had a turn, this game can be placed in a center or used in a small group for         further assessment.
 
Reference
    Holloway, Aretha.  "Gorilla Girl Grows Green with the Letter G".  http://www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/discov/hollowayel.html

    Lionni, Leo.  Swimmy.  Knopf/Pantheon Publishers, c1963.


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