C and G up the Coconut Tree

Emergent Literacy
Christie Shelton



 

Rationale:  One of the two best predictors of students' success in reading is their ability to recognize and name letters of the alphabet (Adams).  In the early years, it is crucial for teachers to teach the alphabet and the corresponding phonemes.  Children need to be able to recognize letters and connect a meaning to the letter symbol.  This lesson is designed to teach the letters G and C, because sometimes these letters are difficult for children to tell apart.  They will identify both letters, write them, and also identify pictures that display their beginning sound.

 

Materials:  Chicka Chicka Boom Boom by Bill Martin, Jr.
            Upper and lower case C and G (made from foam)
            Picture cards (gorilla, goat, grapes, gift, cat, clock, caterpillar, and car)
            Worksheets of each letter from kizclub.com (included)
            Chart with both tongue twisters
            Pencil and Primary Writing Paper 

Procedure:

1.      Introduce lesson by saying, TODAY WE ARE GOING TO TALK ABOUT TWO LETTERS.  THEY ARE C AND G (hold up the foam letters as you say them).  SOMETIMES IT MIGHT BE HARD TO TELL THESE LETTERS APART.  SO, WE ARE GOING TO PRACTICE WRITING THESE LETTERS AND SAYING THEIR SOUNDS.

2.      LET'S SAY THESE LETTERS TOGETHER. (hold up the foam letters) DID YOU HEAR THE /k/ and /g/ sounds?

3.      NOW LETS SAY OUR TONGUE TWISTERS.  (on chart)  First, with C – Claire the cat cooks carrots!  NOW LETS SAY IT TOGETHER.  GOOD!  Next, with G – Grouchy gorillas play in grandmother's garden.  NOW LET'S SAY THAT TOGETHER.  GREAT!

4.      TAKE OUT YOUR PENCILS AND PAPER.  LET'S PRACTICE WRITING OUR LETTERS.  Start with uppercase C.  TO MAKE THE BIG C, (model on chalkboard as you explain), START JUST BELOW THE ROOFTOP, GO UP TOP TOUCH, AROUND, AND UP. TRY A FEW OF THOSE.  Next, lowercase C, START LIKE LITTLE A, GO UP AND TOUCH THE FENCE, THEN AROUND AND UP.  DO A FEW OF THOSE.  Now, uppercase G – MAKE A BIG C, THEN COME BACK TO THE LINE TO GIVE HIM A TRAY TO HOLD STRAIGHT.  MAKE SOME BIG G'S.  Finally, lowercase g – FIRST MAKE LITTLE A, THEN GEE, THAT'S A GOOD IDEA:  IF THE BALL FALLS, IT FALLS INTO THE BASKET. 

5.      LOOK AT THIS PICTURE.  WHAT DO YOU SEE?  (Response)  DOES THAT BEGIN WITH /k/ or /g/?  Let them respond.  Do this with all eight cards. 

6.      Read Chicka Chicka Boom Boom.  Have children make the sounds as they see/hear the letters in the story.

7.      As assessment, give children the worksheet in order to see if they know which pictures begin with the correct sound. 

References:

Marilyn Jager Adams (1990). Beginning to Read: Thinking and Learning About Print, A Summary by Steven A. Stahl, Jean Osborn, and Fran Lehr.  Urbana, IL: Center for the Study of Reading.

Reading Genie Website  

Worksheets from kizclub.com
    C Sound
    G Sound

Martin, Bill, Jr.  Chicka Chicka Boom Boom.  Scholastic, Inc., 2001