Roger That!

Letter Recognition

By Jennifer Overfelt

 

Rationale:  “No matter the level of a child’s phonemic awareness…she or he must learn to identify the visual forms of individual letters” (Adams 59).  In order for children to learn how to read, they must recognize all letters of the alphabet and have a firm understanding of both its meaning and phoneme.  This lesson encourages children to recognize the letter “R” and the sound it makes /r/. Children will be able to identify both upper and lowercase “R” in written language and its phoneme in speech. 

 

Materials: primary paper, ABC picture flashcards, pencils, crayons, Rr Worksheets, Piglet Feels Small by Jennifer Weinberg, flashcards of both “R” words and other words.
 

Procedure:

1.  Start lesson with a review of the previous letters:  A-Q.  Use the ABC picture flashcards to help the children practice writing the letters. 

2.  Introduce the new letter…Radical “R”.  Write the upper and lowercase forms on the board.  CLASS, THIS LETTER IS “R” AND IT MAKES THE SOUND /r/.  CAN YOU SAY THE NAME OF THIS LETTER?  CAN YOU MAKE THE SOUND /r/?  Have them practice the sound /r/ several times to themselves.  Next, pair them up and have them take turns watching what the other person does with their mouth to make the sound.  WHAT DID YOU NOTICE ABOUT YOUR PARTNER’S MOUTH?  WHERE’S THE TONGUE?  DID YOU DO THE SAME MOVEMENT?  VERY GOOD!  LET’S MOVE ON!

3.  As the teacher writes the sentence on the board, tell class, THIS EXCITING TONGUE TWISTER TELLS US A MESSAGE.  CAN YOU FIGURE IT OUT?  ROGER RABBIT RUINED THE ROSES.  LET’S SAY THIS TOGETHER…Rrroger Rrrabbit Rrruined the Rrroses.  TURN TO YOUR NEIGHBOR, PRACTICE BACKAND FORTH AND REALLY “ROAR” THE /R/ SOUND.  Let them practice back and forth several times, then bring them back together and repeat it once more.

4.  Direct the children’s attention to the board where “Rr” is written.  Teacher points to capital “R” and asks, CAN YOU DRAW THIS WITH YOUR FINGER IN THE AIR?  Allow students to draw.  Next, ask the same question for lowercase “r” and allow time for them to practice that.  Then, have students get out primary paper and pencil.  As the teacher models how to write each letter, the students will follow on their paper.

  For capital “R”:  START AT THE ROOF; THEN DRAW A LINE STRAIGHT DOWN TO THE SIDEWALK.  NEXT, BOUNCE RIGHT BACKUP THAT STRAIGHT LINE UNTIL RIGHT BEFORE YOU HIT THE ROOF.  CURVE OUT ANDTHEN MEET THE STRAIGHT LINE AT THE FENCE.  FINALLY, YOU WANT TO SLIDE DOWN THE FENCE TO THE SIDEWALK.  YOU TRY!  I WANT TO SEE THREE STAR PERFORMANCE “R”.

  For lowercase “r”:  START AT THE FENCE AND GO STRAIGHT DOWN TO THE SIDEWALK.  THEN, BOUNCE BACK UP THE STRAIGHT LINE UNTIL RIGHT BEFORE YOU HIT THE FENCE.  INSTEAD OF CROSSING THE FENCE, BARELY TOUCH IT JUST LET IT CURVE AND HANG OUT THERE.  YOU TRY!  I WANT TO SEE THREE STAR PERFORMANCE “r”.  Allow children to finish up their practices.  DO THEY HAVE ANYTING IN COMMON?  WHY OR WHY NOT?  Children should notice that the letters are shaped different, but is still the same letter.

5.  Call on students to answer the following phoneme identity questions:  DO YOU HEAR /r/ IN RAT OR CAT?  SOAP OR ROPE?  ROAD OR TOAD?  Then, use the word flashcards, with words like race, riddle, ring, phone, helmet, rose, etc, to play a game.  Instruct the children to make bear claws when they hear the /r/ sound and sour faces when they don’t hear it in a word.

6.  Read Piglet Feels Small through.  Then, go back and have the children listen for the /r/ sound.  When they hear it, allow them to make bear claws.  During all other sounds, children keep hands in their lap.  Afterwards, give children a picture of a rabbit that can color and have them make up a story about what Roger Rabbit does when he feels small.  Display their work on a bulletin board that looks like a field of flowers.

 

Assessment:  When children have finished that, pass out the Rr worksheet.  Help students label the figures and ask them to circle the items that have the /r/ sound.
 

References:

Zooming through to Z by Randi Lipscomb

        www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/discov/lipscombel.html

Beginning to Read:  Thinking and Learning about Print- A Summary by Marilyn Adams, Champaign: Center for the Study of Reading Research and Education Center (1990)

Piglet Feels Small by Jennifer Weinberg, Disney Enterprises, Inc. (2002)

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