Shhh!
 

shh!

Sara Knight
Beginning Reading Lesson Design


Rationale: Reading and pronouncing words correctly is an important part of the educational process.  Children must be able to attach sounds to the appropriate letter.  Some sounds require two letters, which are called digraphs.  The purpose of this lesson is to teach to children to identify the digraph sh=/sh/, its spelling, and its use in words.

Material:Elkonin boxes (1 set per student); letter manipulatives of letters a, d, f, h, I, o, p, s, t, and w (1 set per student); cards with /sh/ on them (one card per student); a sheet with pictures with /sh/ sound and some that do not have the /sh/ sound (ship, shoe, shirt, fish, ball, car, and cake), the book Shoe Man (1 per student).

Procedure
1.    Today we will be learning the sound /sh/.  Does anyone know what sound /sh/ makes?  Demonstrate by putting my finger over my mouth and making the /sh/ sound like I was asking the class to be quiet.
2.    Let's all practice saying the /sh/ sound.  Put your finger over your mouth and pretend like you are asking the class to be quiet.  Let's say it three times together- sh, sh, sh.  Great job!
3.    Do you know what two letters make the /sh/ sound?  That is correct, s and h.  Listen for the /sh/ sound as I say some words.  Do you hear /sh/ in wish or clap? Shovel or hammer?  Plate or crash?
4.    Now, let's spell some words that have the /sh/ sound with our letterboxes.  Only three boxes should be showing.  Remember that diagraphs go in the same letterbox, so s and h go in the same box.  Now spell the word ship, …fish,…dash,…shot,…wish,…flush, and splash)
5.    Now I am going to write each word on the board and we will read them out loud together.  (read the words out loud)  Now I need 5 volunteers to come and circle sh in the words.
6.    Now we are going to read the book, Shoe Man.  (Pass out a copy to each student.) First we will read it together as a class and then the second time I want everyone to read the book independently and write down the words that have the /sh/ sound.
7.    Now I am going to read a list of words.  Some of the words will have the /sh/ sound but some will not.  When you hear the /sh/ sound I want you to hold up your sh cards. (pass out the sh cards to each student.)  Fish, bed, ship, sour, lamp, shade, dish, fork, show, and rash.
8.    For assessment, I will pass out a worksheet with pictures with the /sh/ sound and pictures that do not have the /sh/ sound.  I will ask the students to write the word under the picture if it contains the sound /sh/ (letterboxes will also be provided for a spelling scaffold).

Reference: Elderedge, J.L., Teaching Decoding in Holistic Classrooms.  Prentice Hall,
    Inc., New Jersey. 1995. pgs 50-70

Click here to return to Inroads .