Why is it so quiet?
Shh, We are reading!
Amy Chastang
Growing Independence and Fluency

Rationale:       In order for children to become more fluent readers, it is important for them to be able to read silently.  Silent reading increases reading speed, comprehension, and voluntary reading.  This lesson will teach children to read silently while reviewing strategies to help read smoother and comprehend more information.

Materials:     A large selection of books that are rated by reading level for the appropriate age group, books with red are high reading level, blue are medium reading level, and yellow are low reading level, chalkboard, and prepared book talk and copy of Mr. Cricket takes a Vacation (Carousel Readers).

Procedure:
 1.     I will introduce the lesson by talking to the children about reading in a new way.  ãWe are going to learn to read books in a new way that will make reading easier and much more fun!ä  ãWe are going to learn to read silently.ä  I will then talk to the children and give a brief book talk on Mr. Cricket takes a Vacation.

2.     After I have gotten the childrenâs attention with the book talk, I will model how to gradually move to reading silently.    ãI want everyone to watch me as I show you how to read silently.ä  First, I will read aloud to them and then I will begin to read using a whisper voice.  I will be explaining each step as I go.  Next, I would read to myself but continue to move my lips.  And last, I would stop moving my lips and read silently.  ãNow see how easy that was!  All you have to do is say the words in your head, but not out loud.  You just have to think the words.ä

3.     ãNow, I want everyone to go and pick a book from the shelf.  Donât forget to get a book that has your color on it.ä  (Children will have been assigned a color according to their reading level).  After the children have chosen a book and returned to their seats, I will have then turn to the first page of their books.  ãNow I am going to count to three and I want everyone to read the first sentence of their books out loud.ä  We will all read together.  ãWow, I donât even know what my book was about because it was so noisy in here!ä  ãCan anyone tell me what their first sentence was about?ä  ãNow do we understand why it is so important to read silently?ä

4.     ãBefore we begin reading, I want to make sure that everyone remembers a few things.ä  ãCan anyone tell me what to do if I come across a word that I do not know?ä  We will then discuss cover ups and I will model how to use that strategy with some words on the board.  I will go over a few words like concrete, display, and computer.

5.     ãAlso, we need to talk about making sure that things make sense.ä  ãWho can tell me what happens when we read a sentence that does not make sense and we just keep going?ä ãThat is right; we will not understand that part of the story.ä  I will then write a sentence on the board (Sally went to buy some tires at the supermarket).  ãDoes this sentence make sense?ä  ãWhat could go instead of tires to make the sentence make sense?ä  ãWhat is one thing that you should do when you come across a sentence that does not make sense?ä  Talk about rereading and remembering what the story is about.  Also, explain the importance of cross-checking for comprehension.

6.     ãNow we have 15 minutes to read silently like I showed you.ä  ãDo not worry if you do not finish your book, we will have time everyday to read silently so you can finish the next day.ä  Give students reading time.  Walk around and observe periodically, but it is important to model by reading silently also.

Assessment:      In order to assess the studentâs reading, I will hold class
 discussions about the books that the students are reading.  If at any point in time,
 a student is suspected of not reading, they will be asked to have a discussion
 with me about their book including answering questions that I may ask.  Students
 will be asked to give book talks on their book when they have completed it in
 order to assess them and gain other studentâs interests in that book.

References:
   Claire Hoffman ãI Canât Hear Youä
  http://www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/breakthroughs/hoffmangf.html
  Mary Ann Harbour ãShhhh.....Silent Readingä
  http://www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/breakthroughs/harbourgf.html
  Barclay OâBrien
  http://www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/breakthroughs/obriengf.html

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