It’s All about Expression


Growing Independence and Fluency

Lauren Kendrick

 

Rationale:

            One characteristic of a skillful reader is fluency.  Fluency is the ability to read more smoothly, faster, and reading with expression.  Reading with expression makes reading more exciting   Reading with expression makes reading more enjoyable for the reader and listener.  Student should be able to do this in silent reading and reading aloud.  This lesson is designed to help students practice on becoming more expressive readers.

Materials:

Blank Audio Tapes and recorders for each pair, Checklist for peer evaluations, lots of books to be read with expression and on reading level, Click Clack Moo, Cows that Type, etc. prepared sentences for teacher on sentence strips each sentence strip will express a different mood (1. Hurray, I get to go to the amusement park today.  I am going to ride all the roller coasters. 2. I can’t go to the birthday party tonight because I am sick with a cold. 3. I am not going outside in the dark by myself.)   

Procedure:

1.  “Class, we have been working on becoming more fluent readers.  Today we are going to work on reading expressively and this means when we show our emotions based on the situation.  Have you ever noticed how people change the tone in their voice when the read or they have different voices for different character in a story?  They are being an expressive reader.  Can you tell me some expressions that we might feel when we are reading a story?  Write student responses on the board.  (Angry, sad, happy, worried, excited, surprised, scared) Great job!   So today I am going to teach you how to read with expression and you are going to practice with a partner.”

2.  “First, I have written 2 sentences on the board.  I am going to read them to you and listen how I read the first sentence without any expression.  (No expression) Hurray, I get to go the amusement park today. I am going to ride all the roller coasters.  Now, see how different the sentence sounds when I read with more excitement in my voice and reading a little faster.  Hurray!! I get to go to the amusement park today!  I am going to ride all the roller coasters.  Listen to me read this next sentence and you tell me how I am feeling by how I read it.  I can’t go to the birthday party tonight because I am sick with a cold.  Can anyone tell me what I am feeling?  Yes, I am very sad because I can’t go to the birthday party.  Did you notice how I slowed down my reading and changed my tone to describe how I was feeling? “

3.  “As a class we are all going to read the last sentence.”  “I am not going outside in the dark by myself.”  “Great job class!  You can tell that we are scared because of the way we changed our tone and our facial movement.”

4.  “Now it’s your turn to practice with a partner.  You will each get a turn reading to one another.  Your partner will do a peer evaluation answering these questions.  Does your partner read smoothly?  Does you partner show emotion with facial movement?  Does you partner vary their tone of voice?  You are going to be reading from any of the books in our collection.”  I will give some book talks on a couple books they might want to use. Click Clack Moo Cows that type by Doreen Cronin, Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! By Mo Willems, or Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina.  The books they will choose from are all on their reading level.  “If you come across a word that you don’t know remember to use your cover ups.  While you are reading your partner is going to record you reading so that you can listen to yourself and I can note your progress in reading expressively.”  Pair up the students and have them spread out throughout the classroom and in the hallway to eliminate distractions. Walk around and observe students reading and takes notes.

5.  “When you are both done reading I want you to listen to your recordings.  Then I want you to turn in your tape to me.  Excellent job class!”  For assessment I will listen to tapes the children recorded and assess based on a checklist of questions, does the student read smoothly?  Does the student show emotion with facial movement?  Does the student vary their tone of voice etc.

Reference:

Angela Pridmore, Expression, Expression, Expression.  http://www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/begin/pridmoregf.html 

Cronin, Doreen. Click, Clack, Moo Cows That Type. Simon & Schuster, 2000.

 Slobodkina, Esphyr. Caps for Sale. Harper Trophy, 1987.

 Willems, Mo. Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! Scholastic, 2003.

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