Kristin Cooke

Emergent Literacy

 

Aaa! A is Scared of the Monster

Monster 

Rationale: It is important for children to understand the relationship between letters and phonemes. Students must be able to make the correspondence between the phoneme and the grapheme to be successful in reading and writing Short vowels are often very difficult for children to grasp because there are differences in sound.  This lesson will help students identify a = /a/.  The students will become more familiar with /a/ by learning how to make the letter symbol and identifying and making the phoneme.  Students will practice finding /a/ in words.

 

Materials:

Procedures:
1.) Introduce the lesson by explaining to the children that writing is something that must be figured out like a puzzle.  In order to figure out this puzzle, the mouth moves we make as we say words and knowing what letters stand for must first be learned.  TODAY WE ARE GOING TO BE PRACTICING HOW TO MOVE OUR MOUTHS TO MAKE THE /a/ SOUND.  SOMETIMES IT IS HARD TO IMMEDIATELY NOTICE /a/, BUT ONCE YOU BECOME FAMILIAR WITH IT, IT WILL BECOME VERY OBVIOUS.

2.) Ask students: HAVE YOU EVER HEARD A SSCARED PERSON SCREAM?  WHAT DID IT SOUND LIKE?  THE /a/ SOUND YOU HEAR WHEN A SOMEONE SCARED SCREAMS IS THE SAME SOUND THAT WE WILL BE TRYING TO FIND IN WORDS.  I WILL SHOW YOU HOW TO RECOGNIZE /a/ IN A WORD.  STRETCH THE WORD OUT AND SEE IF YOU HEAR YOURSELF SAY /a/ SCARED SCREAM.  I WILL DO AN EXAMPLE FOR YOU.  I WILL SAY BAG, BBBA-A-A-A-AG.  BA-A-A...RIGHT THERE! DID YOU HEAR THE SCARED SCREAM?

3.) NOW WE WILL TRY THE TONGUE TWISTER ON THIS CHART.   "ANDREW AND ALICE ASKED IF ANNIE'S ACTIVE ANIMALS WERE ANGRY."  THIS TIME, EVERYBODY SAY IT TOGETHER.  WE ARE GOING TO DO IT AGAIN, BUT THIS TIME, STRETCH THE /a/ AT THE BEGINNING OF THE WORDS.  "AAANDREW AAAND AAALICE AAASKED IF AAANNIE'S AAACTIVE AAANIMALS WERE AAANGRY."  TRY IT ONE MORE TIME, AND THIS TIME, BREAK /a/ OFF EACH WORD: "/a/ NDREW /a/ ND /a/ LICE /a/ SKED IF /a/ NNIE'S /a/ NIMALS WERE /a/ NGRY." AWSOME JOB.

4.) [Ask the students to take out their primary paper and pencil].  WE HAVE TO USE THE LETTER A TO SAY /a/ SO FIRST WE NEED TO KNOW HOW TO WRITE IT.  LET'S PRACTICE.  START UNDER THE FENCE.  GO UP AND TOUCH THE FENCE, THEN AROUND AND TOUCH THE SIDEWALK.  WITHOUT LIFTING YOUR PENCIL, GO AROUND AND STRAIGHT DOWN.  NOW I WANT TO SEE EVERYBODY'S A.  WHEN I CHECK YOURS, GO AHEAD AND MAKE TEN MORE A'S JUST LIKE IT. 

5.) I will randomly call on students to answer and tell how they knew: IN WHICH WORD DO YOU HEAR /a/?  SAT OR SIT?  FIRST OR LAST?  RAG OR CLOTH?  GOOD OR BAD?  I will pass out a card with /a/ on it to each student.  Then, I will have the students see if they can recognize the /a/ mouth movement in some words.  IF YOU HEAR THE /a/ SOUND, HOLD UP THE CARD SO THAT THE GREEN SIDE IS FACING ME.  IF YOU DON'T HEAR THE /a/, HOLD UP THE SIDE THAT IS RED.  One word at a time, I will read the tongue twister: Adam, asked, Anna, for, an, apple.

6.) We will read Pats Jam involving /a/ and discuss the important aspects.  Then, we will read it one more time having the students puts their hands on their cheeks if they hear a word with /a/. Next, I will have the students draw a picture related to the book and write something that relates to it.  Their work will be displayed to show what a good job they are doing.

7.) Finally, to evaluate how much the children have gained from the lesson, I will pass out the page with the illustrations on it.  We will go over them together so that they are aware of what each picture represents.  Then, I will encourage them to circle all of the pictures that they hear /a/.

Reference: Murray, B. Wallach and Wallach Tongue Twisters. The Reading Genie. http://www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/twisters.html.

 

Pat’s Jam.  Phonics Readers Short Vowels.  Carson, CA:  Educational Insights. 
1990.

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