By Aimee Gourdouze
Reading Stage:  Beginning Reading

Choooo!  Choooo!  Here Comes the Train









Rationale:  Sometimes one phoneme is represented with more than one  letter.  The lesson aids in the students understanding of the letters  ch and their sound /ch/ in their spoken and written language by having  them make the sound and spell words that contain the /ch/ sound.   The students will also learn to recognize these words in written  language.

Materials:  Primary paper, pencil, chart with “Charlie checked with Charles about the cherry pie,” set of cards with ch on one side and a question mark on the other, a book “The Little Engine that Could” by Watty Piper

Procedure:
         1.) Introduce lesson by explaining that when certain letters are   combined they make a special sound.  Today we are going to   work on watching our ch as they go by.  The /ch/ sound is a very demanding sound that says look out here I come.
         2.) When a train goes by, what sound does it make?  Let’s see if   we can figure it out?  Chooo!  Chooo!   Let’s say it again.  “Ch”   there it is.  Let’s see if we can make that sound.  /ch/.  Let me show you how to spot that sound in a word.  I’ll try chain.    ch-ch-ch-ai-ai-ai-n-n-n.  ch-ch-ch- there it is, right at the beginning.
         3.) Let’s try a tongue twister.  It is written right here on the chart.    “Charlie checked with Charles about the cherry pie,” Let’s get   everybody to say it together.  This time let’s stretch out the   /ch/. “Chhhhhharlie chhhhhhhecked with Chhhhhharles about the chhhhhhery pie.” Try it again and let’s break it off.  “/ch/   arlie /ch/ ecked with /ch/arles about the /ch/ erry pie.”
         4.) Today we are going to read a few words that have the “ch” sounds   in them.  Let’s look at this word, chalk.  What is the first sound   that our mouth makes? “CH” is how we start off saying this word.  Let’s continue.  Do the same with the words church,   chain, child, chick, touch, and punch.
         5.) Now we are going to try and pick the /ch/ sound out of words.  Do   you hear /ch/ in chain or cub?  Chair or table?  Chalk or pencil?   Now we are going to spot the words in a different way.  When   you hear the/ch/ sound show me the card showing the /ch/, if   you do not, show me the question mark.  Charlie checked with   Charles about the cherry pie.
         6.) Show the students the pictures in the book.  Have the students   read the book.  Then have the students write a message inside of a chain.
         7.) For assessment, have students individually show you words    that do and do not have the /ch/ sound on the index card.    When they show you the words, make sure that they can read the words to ensure not just letter recognition, but also to   ensure their ability to read the new correspondence.

Reference:  www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/breakthroughs/obrienbr.html

Click here to return to Illuminations
Questions:  email me