"Encore!"

Growing Independence and Fluency
 
 

Meredith Evans



Rationale:

As children mature in their literacy, they learn the things that make a story interesting when read aloud besides simply correct and automatic decoding. Students begin to understand that by reading with expression in their voices, they can captivate an audience and make the story come alive. This lesson targets childrenâs abilities to read with expression and helps them to understand that varying the speed and volume of your voice as you read affects how the story is perceived.
 
 

Materials:

  1. copy of James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl for each student and the teacher
  2. homemade fluency check sheets with spaces for speed, volume, and suggestions

Procedure:

  1. Introduce the lesson by discussing that there are many ways we can become better readers. "Did you know that there is a way you can have everyone in a room listening to a story youâre telling? The way you can do that is to read with expression in your voice. Can anyone tell me what expression is?" (Call on a few children for responses.) "Yes, we read expressively when we change the speed and volume of our voices as we read. Today, we will all practice reading with expression."

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  3. "Have you ever had someone read you a story where you got really excited and interested in the story? That person was probably reading with expression. By talking very loud sometimes (demonstrate) and very soft sometimes (demonstrate) while weâre reading, we can make people want to listen to our stories. We can do that also by talking very fast sometimes (demonstrate) and very slow sometimes (demonstrate) while weâre reading."

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  5. "I am going to begin reading James and the Giant Peach. When I finish reading, I want you to say, ÎEncore!â if I read with good expression and ÎNo!â if I do not read with good expression." Read the first page of the book very slowly. ("No!" should be the response.) Discuss with the students that reading slowly through the whole book is not reading with expression. Read the next page of the book very fast. ("No!" should be the response.) Discuss with the students that reading fast through the whole book is not reading with expression. Read the next page of the book very quietly. ("No!" should be the response.) Discuss with the students that reading quietly through the whole book is not reading with expression. Read the next page of the book very loudly. ("No!" should be the response.) Discuss with the students that reading loudly through the whole book is not reading with expression. Read the next page of the book expressively, varying both speed and volume as the text changes. ("Encore!" should be the response.) Discuss with the students that reading using different speeds and volumes depending on what is happening in the story makes it exciting and interesting for the listener.

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  7. Pass out copies of James and the Giant Peach to the entire class. This is a familiar book to the students. Divide students up into pairs to practice reading expressively to each other. Each student will use a fluency check sheet to tell about the speed and volume of his or her partnerâs reading and will then make suggestions for improvement. "Donât forget to check the rest of the sentence for meaning if you find a word you are not sure about."

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  9. For assessment, each student will conference with the teacher and read aloud. As the student reads, the teacher will use the same copy of the fluency check sheet to comment on the studentâs reading and make suggestions for improvement.

Reference:

http://www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/breakthroughs/vestgf.html
 
 

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