Aaahh!!  Open Wide



Beginning Reading
By Milissa King



Rationale:      

Children need to understand that letters have corresponding phonemes or vocal gestures to go with them.  For children to be able to read, they need to understand these correspondences which consist of letters (graphemes) and phonemes (vocal gestures or sounds).  When children understand these correspondences, spelling and reading becomes more accessible.  In this lesson, the children will have a clear demonstration and practice with the o = /o/ correspondence.  Upon completion of this lesson, they will be aware of and able to identify words with the o = /o/ sound and make some words with the o = /o/ sound by sounding out words and spelling them using letterbox lessons.

 

Materials:      

Primary Paper & Pencil for  each child

Picture of the capital and lower case letter "O."

Hand Gesture for the letter "O" (press thumb for a tongue depressor)

Tongue Twister "Ollie, Ollie Octopus" "Officer Ollie Octopus offers operator Octavia Ox an octagon in October." – have this written out on sentence strip, chart paper or on the board for them to see after you say it to them.

Chalk & Chalkboard, Marker & Butcher paper OR Something else for teacher to model and write on.

Copy of o = /o/ picture (child at the doctor saying /o/) for each child

Book:  Hawkins, C. & Hawkins, J. (1986)  Tog the Dog.  Putnam Publishing Group, Inc.  New York.  (copy for each child)

Letterboxes:  set of 2, 3, 4, 5 for each student and teacher

Letterbox letters for each student and teacher:  b, b, c, d, g, l, m, n, p, p, r, s, t, z, o

Overhead (for teacher to model letterbox lesson)

List of these words:  eggs, umbrella, octopus, pig, Ollie, dog, apple, pots

Notebook with paper & pencil for anecdotal notes

15 pictures for sorting game for each student – pictures with the o = /o/ in the picture, a = /a/, u  = /u/.  (various pictures  could be of an  Octopus, apple, ball, ox, cot, bat, sock, etc...)

Phoneme Identities Checklist

Anecdotal Notebook for recording any additional information about childrens' learning (each child will have thier own section)

                       

Procedures:

1.   "Today we are going to talk about one of my favorite letters.  It is one of by favorite letters because I see it and use it every day. I'll bet you see it and use it every day also.  It is the letter "O" (To teacher: show them the letter "O" – either written or a picture of it) and we are going to learn about the sound it makes and how our mouth looks when we say its sound.  We are also going to be expert detectives by the end of the lesson and we will be able to easily find the o = /o/ sound in many different words.

 

2.  "How many of you have ever been to the doctor?  When you went did you have to open your mouth and say /o/ while he stuck something in your mouth and looked down your throat?  I have too.  Can everyone say that?   Good.  Now when you say it, turn to your neighbor, pretend you are the doctor, and press your thumb in front of their mouth like this (as if their thumbs were tongue depressors). This sound is very special because it has a letter that is its friend and almost always travels with it wherever it goes (Present to them a picture of the capital and lower case "O."  "Can you say "/o/?" (dramatized and drawn out)  When you say /o/ I want you to think about what your mouth is doing.  Can you see what mine is doing when I say /o/?"

 

3.  "There are many words with the sound /o/ sound – dramatized and drawn out – (o = /o/).  I would like for you all to listen to what I say and when you hear the /o/ sound press your thumb as if you are the doctor looking down your patient's throat.  Are you ready? – "Officer Ollie Octopus offers operator Octavia Ox an octagon in October." (stressing/ dramatizing the o = /o/ in every word.)  To teacher:  Now take the tongue twister out that was written down (on chart paper, sentence strips or on the board) and show it to them in written context.  Now let's all say it together like I just did (dramatizing the /o/ sound).  Good job.  Now we are going to try something a little different.  Let's take off the o = /o/ sound as we say the tongue twister."  To teacher:  Point to the words as children say the tongue twister.  "Good job – I heard a lot of you at the doctor getting your throat checked."

 

4.  "Now I would like for you to take out your paper and pencil so we can write the letter that makes the /o/ sound ourselves.  Let's try the capital O first but before you do it alone, I want you to watch me (model for the students on chart paper with lines or on the board with lines) – Everyone remembers how to make a 'C' like this:  Start just below the rooftop, go up to touch it, around and down through the fence, down to the sidewalk, around and back up.  Well to make an 'O', you do the same thing (model a 'C' again except this time explain that when you close it, it makes an 'O') Good job boys and girls!  It looks like all of you have made this letter before.  What shape does this look like?  Does it look like a square?  That's right.  It doesn't look like a square, It looks like a circle.  Now let's try the lowercase o – Start just below the fence, go up to touch it, around and down to the sidewalk, around and back up to close it.  It looks just like the capital O except it is smaller.  Now you practice the capital O – that is the big one – on your paper.  I will be walking around if anyone needs help.  Now practice the lower case o by yourselves on your paper.  Excellent, excellent job boys and girls!! 

 

5.     Pass out the cards with the picture of the child at the doctor (the o = /o/ cards) to each child.  "There are many words with the /o/ sound in them.  When I say a word with the /o/ sound in it, I want you to raise the card with the picture of the child at the doctor and open your mouth like the doctor is looking down your throat.  If you do not hear the /o/ sound, I want you to close your eyes and touch your nose. To teacher:  say these words:  eggs, umbrella, octopus, pig, Ollie, dog, apple, pots.  To teacher:  observe students' answers.  "Good job boys and girls!  You really know this sound!   Now, I wonder if any of you can tell me some words with the /o/ sound in them.  (Record children's answers on chart paper with lines or on the board with lines as the students respond) discuss their answers.  Excellent, excellent job boys and girls!!

 

6.    Now I am going to show you how to listen for the o = /o/ sound in words to figure out what the word says.  The word mop = /m/ /o/ /p/ (on the board or overhead) with the letters for a letterbox lesson (letters m, o, and p).  I see the letter that makes the /o/ sound so I am going to pull that letter down.  (Pull letter and place it below the original word.  Now I see the m = /m/ sound so I am going to pull that down. Now I have m = /m/ and o = /o/.  What do we have left?  That's right, the p = /p/ sound.  Now I have the m = /m/, o = /o/, and p = /p/.  When we put them all the sounds together, we get the word mop = /m/ /o/ /p/ = /mop/.  Now I want you to try to make the words that I say.  (I am assuming the children have already had practice with letterboxes before.)  Pass out the letterboxes and letters to the children.  Remember to face the lowercase letters face up.  Model a letterbox with the word /mop/ then /pop/.  Now I want you to practice.  Take out two letterboxes.  Is everyone ready?  Make the word on.  Now the word oz.  Great job!! Now take out three letterboxes.  (One by one) – make the word dog, sob, rot.  Let's try four letterboxes.  Make the word clog, blob, stop.  Now let's try five letterboxes.  Make the word frost, blond.  Great job everyone.  Now I am going to make some words on the overhead and I would like you to read them out loud.  (Make the words mop, dog, oz, sob, clog, on, pop, stop, rot, blob).

 

7.    Read the story Tog the Dog by Colin & Jacqui Hawkins and discuss the story with the children.  "I am going to read the story Tog the Dog by Colin & Jacqui Hawkins.  I want you to listen as I read and when you hear the sound o = /o/ I would like for you to press your thumb like you are the doctor looking in your patient's throat.  Have a copy of this book for each child.  After the teacher reads the story, the children are to read to their partner and listen for words with the o = /o/ sound. Each child will share their findings with the class after reading.

 

8.    I will assess the children throughout the lesson by observing the answers to questions I ask and by walking around as children work – making anecdotal notes.  I will also have children play a sorting game/ review game with various pictures.  I will review the names of the pictures so children will not be confused by them, then the children will sort the pictures and put them under the main picture that has the same phoneme in its word.  I will assess children (with anecdotal notes) as they play the review game



References:

Bennett, Shelley - Open Wide! -  http://www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/discov/bennettbr.html

Hawkins, C. & Hawkins, J.  (1986)  Tog the Dog.  Putnam Publishing Group, Inc.  New York.

Lesniak, T. & Murray, B.  (1999)  Teaching Reading - The Letterbox Lesson:  A Hands-on Approach for        Teaching Decoding.  The Reading Teacher.  Vol. 52, No. 6

Mink, Shay  -  Aaaa!  Being Happy!  -  The Reading Genie  -                                                                      http://www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/openings/minkbr.html

Walton, Christen  -  The Baby's Crying...Aaah!  -  The Reading Genie  -                                                     http://www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/elucid/waltonbr.html

Williams, Rachel  -  Rub a Dub Dub  -  The Reading Genie  -                                                                     http://www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/discov/williamsbr.html


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Questions or Comments?  e-mail  Milissa King