Big Dirty Dogs

Dog 

 

Kathryn Mangum

Emergent Lesson Design

Rationale - Letter recognition is one of the most important indicators of children's ability to learn to read. The goal of this lesson is to teach the students the difference between the letters b and d. This would be a lesson to taught after the children have learned both b and d.  Another goal of this lesson would be for the children to recognize the different sounds and mouth movements of the two letters.

 

Materials

            Primary writing paper

            A pencil for each child

            Poster board with tongue twister "Billy and Betty baked brown bread for Barbara's baby"

            Poster board with tongue twister "David's daddy's dog didn't dig dirt in the dark."

Pictures of objects that start with either a b or a d (dog, ball, bat, doughnut, door, block, brick, diamond.)

            The book Chicka Chicka Boom Boom

            Blue sticky notes

            Green sticky notes.

            A card with the letter b on it

            A card with the letter d on it

 

Procedures

1. We will begin with a review of the letter. "Can anyone tell me what letter we have already learned?" "That's right the letter b" "What sound does the letter b make?" "What shape does our mouth make when we make that letter?"

 

2. Today we are going to work on the letter b and a letter that can sometimes get confused with b. "Let's review b first." Hold up the card with the letter b on it. It’s b. B sounds like /b/. Like a heartbeat. Let’s hold our hand over our heart and say /b/. Let’s say this tongue twister, "Billy and Betty baked brown bread for Barbara’s baby." Hold up the card with the letter d on it and ask if anyone knows what letter this is. It's d. D sounds like /d/. Like a drum let's beat our drum while we say /d/. Let's say this tongue twister "David's daddy's dog didn't dig dirt in the dark."

 

3. Give each student one green sticky note and one blue sticky note. Now I'm going to hold up pictures. Hold up your green sticky note if it is a b and hold up your blue sticky note if it is a d. Hold up each picture assessing if the students can hold up the right sticky note.

 

4. Ask the students to get out their pencil and primary paper. To write a lowercase b start at the roof, go down, bounce up and around. Let the students practice. Then show them how to make a lowercase d. First make a little c, them little d. Ask the students to practice and look at how different the two letters are.

 

5. Then take out the big book Chicka Chicka Boom Boom. Before you begin reading ask the students to raise their hands when they hear a b or a d.  Then call on a student and ask them to either put a green sticky note under the letter if it is a b or a blue sticky note under the letter if it is a d.

  

6. The students will be assessed in their ability to write their letters and their ability to hold up the right sticky or to place the right one under the letter. Then to assess them I will call them up to my desk and ask them if there is a /b/ in bay or day.

 

References

1. Chicka Chicka Boom Boom  Bill Martin Jr. and Archambault; Aladdin Paperbacks, August 2000, 40 pgs.

 

2. Michelle Mazza, Bouncing and Dancing with B and D, http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/odysseys/mazzael.html

 

3. Wallach, M.A. & Wallach, L. (1976). Teaching All Children to Read. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Wallach and Wallach's Tongue Twisters: http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/twisters.html

 

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