Map Making
 
 

Stephanie Skinner
Reading To Learn

Rationale:  In order for students to be successful readers they have to be able to comprehend  what they read. One way for students    to be successful is to concentrate on and  remember the story structure. Story structure is when you think about the characters, the  time of the story, where it took place, and goal or the problem. Students have to ask  themselves five main questions in order to get to this structure. These questions are:   1_Who is the main character?  2_Where and when did the story take place?  3_What did  the main characters do?  4_How did the story end?  and 5_How did the main character  feel?

Materials: Each student needs a copy of Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White, each student needs a story map [http://www.smcps.k12.md.us/mbms/writing/storymap.html] (has places to fill in place, time, problem, goal, action, and the outcome), one copy of Where the Wild Things Are, a large laminated story map, and a marker for the chart.

Procedures:

        1. When we want to remember what we’ve read we have to ask ourselves some questions. These questions are about the story and the main characters.

        2. Have you ever read something and then couldn’t remember what you had just read? (Get a few responses.) Even if YOU haven’t, I have. One way for us to remember what we’ve read is to ask ourselves some questions throughout the story. These questions are: 1_Who is the main character?  2_Where and when did the story take place?  3_What did the main characters do?  4_How did the story end?  and 5_How did the main character feel?

        3. Everyone needs to get in a place so that they can see this big chart. This chart has room for us to fill in the title, setting, characters, problem, events, and solution. I will read a book to you first. While I am reading I need you to remember and be thinking about the things on the chart. (Read Where the Wild Things Are to the students.) Ok now that we’ve read the story lets fill in the needed information. (The students and I will fill in the information.) Very Good!

        4. Now since you all did so well, you can try it on your own. Come up and get a copy of Charlotte’s Web and a handout just like the big one we just used.

        5. Who can tell me what we do when we silent read? Right! We read without speaking. We read within our minds. Let’s now begin reading Charlotte’s Web silently. As you read, fill in the spaces on the story map (assessment). I will give you time in class to read this book over the next few days. We will even read out loud and work together on some days.

References:
        Pressley, M.; Johnson, C. J.; Symons, S.; McGoldrick, J. A.; and Kurity, J. A. (1989). Strategies that Improve Children’s Memory and Comprehension of Text. The Elementary School Journal, 90, 3-32.
        http://www.smcps.k12.md.us/mbms/writing/storymap.html
 
 

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