READ, READ, READ!
Growing Independence and Fluency
Joanna Hall

Rational: The final step to becoming a successful reader is fluent reading.  In order to become a successful, fluent reader, one must read, read, read!  The more
practice the better!  Some characteristics of a successful reader are the abilities to read smooth, fast and with expression.  In order to gain these characteristics,
students with perform repeated readings of the same text.  Becoming a fluent reader increases comprehension·the ultimate goal of reading!

Materials:
- Marker
- Dry Erase board
- Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed by Eileen Christelow
- There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Bat by Lucille Colandro
- The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
- Checklist

Procedures:
1. Introduce the lesson: FLUENT READING IS A VERY IMPORTANT PART OF BECOMING A SUCCESSFUL READER.  FLUENT READING TAKES
PRACTICE ö WE NEED TO LEARN TO READ FAST, SMOOTHLY, AND WITH EXPRESSION.  DOES ANYONE KNOW WHAT IT MEANS TO
READ SMOOTHLY AND WITH EXPRESSION?  (Make sure everyone knows what it means before continuing.)  WELL, TODAY CLASS, WE ARE
GOING TO READ THE SAME TEXT SEVERAL TIMES IN ORDER TO DEVELOP READING FLUENCY.  IS EVERYONE READY? (Remind
students that FLUENT READERS DO NOT ALWAYS KNOW EVERY WORD.  IF YOU COME TO A WORD YOU DO NOT KNOW, READ TO
THE END OF THE SENTENCE OR USE THE SILENT COVER-UP METHOD.
2. Write a sentence on the board: (I cannot go to school today, said Little Peggy Ann McKay.)  Read the sentence slowly to the students.  I CANNNNOT GO
TO SCHOOOOL TODAAAY SAID LITTTTLE PEGGGY ANNNN McKAAAY.  Sound out some words slowly and model the silent cover-up method on some
words.  Read the sentence a second time more smoothly and with expression and ask the students which one they liked better.  WHY DID YOU LIKE IT
BETTER?  BECAUSE IT SOUNDED BETTER, DIDN'T IT?
3. Write another sentence on the board.  (I had a hamburger and coke for lunch today.  It was good!)  Divide the class into groups and have them practice
reading it to one another until they can read it smoothly and with expression.  When they finish ask them: WHICH TIME SOUNDED BETTER ö WHEN YOU
READ IT THE FIRST TIME OR THE LAST? (The answer should be the last time.)  THIS IS WHY WE HAVE TO PRACTICE READING TO BECOME
GOOD AT IT!
4. Read Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed to the class.  NOW I WANT EVERYONE TO FOLLOW ALONG WITH ME SO THAT WE CAN ALL
BECOME FAMILIAR WITH THE BOOK. (read)  DID EVERYONE NOTICE HOW I READ SMOOTHLY AND WITH EXPRESSION?  IT REALLY
MADE THE BOOK COME ALIVE!
5. NOW EVERYONE HAS THE OPTION TO CHOOSE A BOOK TO READ.  YOU MAY READ Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed, The Very
Hungry Caterpillar, There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Bat, OR ANY OTHER BOOK FROM OUR CLASSROOM LIBRARY.  MAKE SURE
TO DO THE TWO-FINGER TEST WHEN CHOOSING WHICH BOOK TO PRACTICE WITH ö READ THE FIRST PAGE, IF THERE ARE MORE
THAN TWO WORDS ON A PAGE THAT YOU DO NOT KNOW, PICK ANOTHER BOOK.
6. Allow the children 30 minutes or so to practice reading their book of choice.

Assessment: Have each child come to your desk and read a page from the book that they chose to read.  Have a checklist prepared to assess the children on
speed, smoothness and fluency.
 

References:

Carle, Eric.  (1987).  The Very Hungry Caterpillar.  New York: Thilomel Books.

Christelow, Eileen.  (1989).  Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed.  New York: Scholastic, Inc.

Colandro, Lucille.  (2002).  There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Bat.  New York: Scholastic, Inc.

Routh, Yolanda.  Sh-Sh-Sh-Sh-Shhhhhh Reading.  http://www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/openings/routhgf.html

Stewart, Christi.  Ready, Set, Read!  http://www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/openings/stewartgf.html

Click here to return to Discoveries.