It’s Time to Open Wide for


Emergent Literacy Design

Sarah Barton

Rationale:
The single best predictor of a child’s reading success is phonemic awareness. If students are phonemically aware then they know the sounds that comprise words and can pick them out which increases their ability to decode the English language. Students must have this awareness to read. Thus, the goal of this lesson is for students to learn and practice the mouth movements for the short vowel o and how to recognize it in spoken speech. This will be done by the movement of a yawn for short o. Students will practice saying o with an o tongue twister, picking out the /o/ sound in spoken words, and printing the letter O.


Materials:
Pictures of an Octopus and Ostrich, primer paper and pencils for each child, pipe cleaners, dry erase board, index cards: mop, mat, pop, pat, hot, hat, on, in, and books: Doc in the Fog, ABC Yummy, and Alphabet City.


Procedures:
Introduction: Start by asking the students if they like solving mysteries. Explain that the English language has a mystery in it and you need their help solving the mystery which is breaking a code. The hard part about the mystery is figuring out the code. “Today we will be figuring out about the letter O which is going to help us break part of the code like we did for short a, e, and i.”


1. Review with the students the previous short vowels (a,e,i) learned using the book, ABC Yummy. Reading the pages as a review to the students.

2.Turn to the page for the letter O. Tell the students that this is letter O and demonstrate what sound it makes o=/o/. Ask students what they do when they are tired? if any of them yawn? “The sound in the letter O is made when you are tired and yawn. How many of you yawn when you are tired? Let’s all practice our yawns and stretch out our arms while we say /o/.”

3. Hold up the picture of the Octopus. Tell the students that it is an Octopus and it starts with /o/. Have the students repeat the word Octopus. Have the students repeat Octopus again adding the motion of yawning and stretch out the sound /o/. Do the same for Ostrich.

4. Introduce a tongue twister. “Now I want to see if you can hear the /o/ sound in this tongue twister, ‘The Octopus and Oliver went to the Opera in October.’ Did you hear the /o/ sound?” Repeat the tongue twister exaggerating the /o/ sound. “Now it’s your turn to say it. Let’s say the tongue twister all together while yawning when we say /o/.” Have the students repeat the tongue twister with exaggerated mouth movements.

5. Take out the book Alphabet City and turn to the page with the letterO. Tell the students that this is letter O and they are going to learn to make the letter O. “The letter O is round like a circle. I want to use the pipe cleaners to make the letter O. Take the two ends up beside each other and wrap the around each other. Then you will have an O.” Hand out the pipe cleaners.

6. Have students get out primer paper. On the board have a larger dotted line grid correctly labeled. Go over where the roof, fence, and sidewalk are on the paper. “You are going to make an O on your paper like you did with your pipe cleaner. First put your pencil on the paper like you are making a big C, a little below the roof, come up and touch the roof and bring it down to the sidewalk like you are making big C then go back around and close it up at the roof.” Have students practice making big O all the way down your paper while repeating the instructions. Next have the students look back at the board for little O. “Now we are going to make little O. We are going to start just below the fence and come up and touch the fence and bring it down to the sidewalk like we are making little C then come around and close it up just below the fence.” Have students make little O on their paper as you continue to give verbal instructions.

7. Gather students in a reading corner for a read aloud with a decode book for short O. “We are going to be reading Doc in the Fog. Doc is a man who can do magic with his magic wand. When Doc taps things POOF they change like magic. We must read and find out what Doc does with his magic."

8. Have the students sing the short /o/ song.

Where is short o? Where is short o?
Here I am. Here I am.
I am in a hot pot, rocky top, and stop clock.
o - o - o    o - o – o

Assessment: Individually, for each student, hold up index of cards of mop and mat. Ask students do they hear /o/ in mop or mat. Record their answer for record keeping. Repeat procedures for pop/ pat, hot/ hat, on/ in.

Assessment: Give students a worksheet of vowels and have them pick out the letterO.

a

E

i

A

O

I

o

e

I

O

o

i

A

E

O

i

A

O

o

e


References:
Adams, Marilyn(1990). Beginning to Read: Thinking and Learning about Print – A Summary; pgs 36-37, 40-44.


Eldredge, J. Lloyd(2005). Teach Decoding: Why and How, second edition; Upper Saddle River, NJ; Pearson Education, Inc. pgs 65-66.


Jahn-Clough, Lisa(1997).ABC Yummy. Walter Lorraine Books. Boston, MA.


Johnson, Stephen T(1999). Alphabet City. Puffin Books. NewYork.


Mink, Shay. OOOhhhh, My Toe!!!. <http://www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/openings/minkel.html>

Jones. The Short Vowel Song. <http://www.mrsjones.org/songs/vowelshort.html>


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