Autmn B. Sims
Reading to Learn
  Rationale: When children become fluent readers, it is very important for them to comprehend what they are reading.  An effective strategy for comprehension is summarization.  This lesson is designed to help
children single out and understand the main ideas of a passage.

Materials: Discover Science (4th grade textbook) Scott, Forseman, 1989; paper; pencils; chalkboard; chalk; poster with summarization rules listed: 1. Get rid of unnecessary and repetitive information.
2. Organize and put items and events in order by their importance to the
selection.  3. Find a sentence or rewrite your own that covers everything the writer is
saying about the topic.

Procedure: 1. Introduce the lesson by explaining to the students "it is very important that we understand what we are reading."  "There is a way to put all of the important information together and leave the unnecessary stuff out, so we can better understand what we are reading.  It is called summarization and we will learn how to use it today."
2. "To begin, I want you to read the passage that I have selected for youfrom the
science book, silently.  You will be able to read at your own pace since we’re doing it
silently."
3. Present the three main rules for summarizing after they have finished their
silent reading.  "There are three important rules to remember when summarizing a
passage: 1. Get rid of unnecessary and repetitive information. 2. Organize and put items
and events in order by their importance to the selection.  3. Find a sentence or rewrite
your own that covers everything the writer is saying about the topic."
4. Model a summarization map on the board.  Have students submit their ideas and also draw the map
out on their own paper.  "Someone tell me the topic we just read about.  Good, the
reading was about rain.  We’re going to write it in the middle of our paper and draw a
circle around it.  Now let’s think about the most important things we learned about rain.
We need to come up with about 3 or 4 facts that we learned and we will space these
around our circle.  Yes, you are right, we do need rain for our crops to grow.So let’s
write plants and crops in one of our circles.  Now who can think of another?  This method
will be helpful when we write our paragraph summary."
5. "Now I want you to use the information that we just gathered to write a paragraph summary about rain for me."
6. For assessment, students will be assigned another section of the chapter about thunder to read.
They will also be asked to write a paragraph summary of the selection.  I will have a
checklist and make sure each student followed the summarization
rules.

References:
Pressley, M., Johnson C. J., Symons, S., McGoldrick, J. A., & Kurity, J.
A. (1989). Strategies that improve children’s memory and comprehension of text.
The Elementary School Journal, 90, 3-32.

http://www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/breakthroughs/lankfmm.html(Megan Lankford)
"Summarize What You Read".
 

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